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  • Mike Doran
    In 1999 I visited the cities of Wichita, Tulsa and Oklahoma City (I was vacationing and visiting my bro and sis in Tulsa)--taking time to view and photograph
    Message 1 of 3 , May 24, 2003
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      In 1999 I visited the cities of Wichita, Tulsa and Oklahoma City (I
      was vacationing and visiting my bro and sis in Tulsa)--taking time
      to view and photograph the tornado damage from the outbreak on May
      3, 1999. What I noticed most was that the largest tornadoes all
      visited, almost exactly, the Southern sector of the urban areas.
      This was beyond random probability--if you merely take ten degrees
      of arc out of 360 and cube it, the chance of this happening randomly
      is in the 10s of thousands--and that is with the further assumption
      that the big cities all get hit, and that is what Wichita, Tulsa,
      and OKC are to that region. This couldn't have happened by chance.

      The next several months I looked at urban heat island studies and
      read everything I could on the subject. To my surprise, Atlanta had
      a study for the olympics that showed that there was an increased
      chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon, and that the storms had a
      tendancy . . . to go to the Southern sector! That summer (1999) I
      watched a number of storms in urban centers on radars from TWC and
      noticed the same thing reoccurring in cities like Pheonix, the
      greater Salt Lake City area, Kansas City, and so forth.

      Now someone has done an interesting temperature profile that I would
      like to share:

      http://www.webace.com.au/~wsh/cities.htm

      However, I want to make a few things clear. IMHO, it isn't so much
      CO2 as a GHG that is working its wonders here. CO2 is known to be up
      to DOUBLE in urban areas (about 550 ppm) from the cars and
      industrial activity. That said, this kind of concentration of CO2
      will change the ACIDITY or pH of the water vapor in the air.
      Further, water from suburban settings, beit from sprinkling and
      lawns or from water vapor from car exhaust, is going to have a
      profound ELECTRICAL meaning--making for a greater tendancy for
      electrons to be able to move from ionosphere to ground opposing fair
      weather proton movements to ground.

      The metal of cities, destributed broadly, will offer a better
      dielectric. Finally, the asphalt roads and tar roofs offer black
      albedo surfaces--absorbing the light energy and turning it to heat.
      NASA has some pretty neat pictures of Salt Lake City showing that.

      All and all, it means that there is a greater chance in the cities
      for convection and cirrus enhancement--that the heat gets trapped in
      the cities and this results, with ambiant winds and EMF conditions,
      to bring greater probabilities to the urban areas for warmer, wetter
      conditions, and specifically, w/ coriolis forcings, produces a
      greater chance of rain in the southern sectors of urban areas.
    • David
      ... there was an increased chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon,
      Message 2 of 3 , May 25, 2003
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        >To my surprise, Atlanta had a study for the olympics that showed that
        there was an increased chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon, <

        That in itself is not unusual for the southeastern US during the
        summer. You could post a forecast in early June that said, "Hazy,
        hot, and humid, with a 30% chance of afternoon and evening
        thunderstorms" and let it run through early September, and most days
        you'd be right.
      • Mike Doran
        Perhaps I wasn t clear about the study--it compared greater Atlanta, which is a big sprawling burb now, certainly large enough for coriolis to kick it even as
        Message 3 of 3 , May 25, 2003
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          Perhaps I wasn't clear about the study--it compared greater Atlanta,
          which is a big sprawling burb now, certainly large enough for
          coriolis to kick it even as large scale a forcing as it is. It
          compared greater Atlanta to the nearby area and found that the city
          was hit with more storms at a specified time of day and specified
          place in the urban area--the southern sector. The result was
          statistically significant and matched what I had observed in the
          outbreak with Wichita, Tulsa and OKC.

          --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David" <b1blancer1@e...>
          wrote:
          > >To my surprise, Atlanta had a study for the olympics that showed
          that
          > there was an increased chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon, <
          >
          > That in itself is not unusual for the southeastern US during the
          > summer. You could post a forecast in early June that said, "Hazy,
          > hot, and humid, with a 30% chance of afternoon and evening
          > thunderstorms" and let it run through early September, and most
          days
          > you'd be right.
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