Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Cloud physics research

Expand Messages
  • Mike Doran
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1871297.stm http://www.nature.com/nsu/020311/020311-6.html One year ago . . . ++++++++
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 13, 2003
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1871297.stm

      http://www.nature.com/nsu/020311/020311-6.html

      One year ago . . .

      ++++++++

      http://www.sepp.org/weekwas/2002/Aug24.htm

      Ice age epochs on the earth may result from our solar system's trek
      through the spiral arms of the Milky Way. Nir Shaviv
      (shaviv@..., +972-54-738555), of the University of
      Toronto and Jerusalem's Hebrew University bases this hypothesis on
      correlations he has found between apparent changes in the flux of
      cosmic rays reaching the earth and geological evidence for major ice
      ages in the past billion years.

      . . .


      Fangqun Yu, a research associate with the Atmospheric Sciences
      Research Center at the State University of New York-Albany, has shown
      that cosmic rays may have height-dependent effects on Earth's
      cloudiness. Yu's National Science Foundation supported study is
      published in the July 2002 issue of the American Geophysical
      Union's "Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics."


      http://www.geog.ucl.ac.uk/~mtodd/papers/jgr_2001/jgr_jd_2001_000405_re
      vised.doc

      Cosmic rays are comprised of energetic particles, mainly protons,
      originating from all directions in space, from both solar and non-
      solar sources. A distinction can be made between solar protons (SP)
      with relatively low energy levels (10-300 MeV) and GCR with higher
      energy levels (300MeV to 10GeV). The solar wind has a strong role in
      modulating cosmic ray intensity (Yamada et al., 1998). In particular,
      at short time scales, irregular decreases of GCR intensity, known as
      Forbush decreases (FD), can be observed. FD events are associated
      with magneto-hydrodynamic disturbances following solar coronal mass
      ejections (Krivsky and Ruzickova-Topolova, 1978, Reiter 1992).

      Upon entering the magnetosphere cosmic ray particles are influenced
      by the Earth's magnetic field and the configuration of the
      magnetosphere. As the cosmic ray particles enter the atmosphere they
      collide with other atmospheric particles. Cosmic rays are the
      principle cause of ionisation in the lower atmosphere, which peaks at
      a height of 10-20km in the atmosphere. It has been suggested that
      cosmic ray ionisation has direct and indirect impacts on cloud
      microphysics (Dickinson, 1975; Tinsley and Deen, 1991; Tinsley et
      al., 1989). GCR may directly influence cloud through the production,
      via cosmic ray ionisation, of cloud condensation and/or ice nuclei.
      Indirect mechanisms include modulation of the atmospheric electrical
      conductivity within the 'global electric circuit' by GCR ionisation
      and subsequent effects on cloud microphysics through the process of
      electro-scavenging (Tinsley et al., 2000). Tinsley et al. (2000)
      showed greater scavenging rates for charged evaporation aerosols in
      non-thunderstorm clouds compared to non-charged aerosols. A further
      indirect mechanism has been proposed in which GCR ionisation
      influences nitrous oxide and ozone production and thus stratospheric
      heating rates. This alters the stratospheric and tropospheric
      circulation and possibly the cloud distribution (Brasseur and
      Solomon, 1995). Through both direct and indirect processes it is
      hypothesised that an increase (decrease) in GCR should result in an
      increase (decrease) in cloud, greatest for high clouds and at high
      geomagnetic latitudes where transmission of the cosmic ray flux is at
      its maximum. FD events have been associated with a decline in high
      cloud at high latitudes of the northern hemisphere (Pudovkin and
      Veretenenko, 1995).

      Comment:

      Of course, none of this work contemplates the impact of the biosphere
      on these EMF/cosmic ray forcings to clouds
    • David
      This is vert interesting, Mike! Let me run this past you. A more active sun means a more energetic and denser solar wind. On a solar system-wide scale, this
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 13, 2003
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        This is vert interesting, Mike! Let me run this past you. A more
        active sun means a more energetic and denser solar wind. On a solar
        system-wide scale, this will serve to expand the sun's heliosphere,
        and also to provide something of a shield against incoming extra-solar
        cosmic rays. Conversely, an inactive sun will allow more cosmic rays
        to penetrate deeper into the solar system, and therefore reach Earth.
        According to the article, more cosmic rays means, at least
        theoretically, more clouds.

        So, an inactive sun could have a double-whammy on Earth's climate!
        One, decreased solar energy output will obviously mean less energy
        getting to Earth. That means cooling for Earth. Now, we can possibly
        add in the effect of more cosmic rays meaning more cloud cover, which
        will further reduce the amount of solar energy reaching the Earth's
        surface. More cooling! One could easily see how an extended period
        of solar inactivity could lead to an ice age!
      • Mike Doran
        David, I just wish I could give you years of biological education in a paragraph or two, but I would have to disagree again with your characterization.
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 13, 2003
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          David,

          I just wish I could give you years of biological education in a
          paragraph or two, but I would have to disagree again with your
          characterization. Understand this isn't about hot and cold but about
          MODULATED hot and cold. IOWs if I put you in a heated room your body
          temperature stays at 98.6 degrees--and you sweat. But if you catch a
          cold your body temperature rises.

          What the cosmic rays would do is increase the protons to ground and
          how the ocean terresphere EMF balance is modulated by the biosphere.
          Once an area is frozen the hydrology ends and so do river feedbacks.
          IOWs what we are talking about is the RISK of putting a neo glacier
          on and how long it takes for the sun to melt it back without
          precipitation replacing it.

          This is why we see storms w/ the elevated PROTON wind. But that
          doesn't mean that these storms are not modulated by the biosphere and
          the EMF control it exerts . . .

          So it again comes back to feedback loops and DEFECTS in them by a
          fossil fuel subsidized culture--or a culture that messes w/ its
          hydrology, and therefore the modulating biosphere in the deltas of
          this hydrology . . .

          --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David" <b1blancer1@e...>
          wrote:
          > This is vert interesting, Mike! Let me run this past you. A more
          > active sun means a more energetic and denser solar wind. On a solar
          > system-wide scale, this will serve to expand the sun's heliosphere,
          > and also to provide something of a shield against incoming extra-
          solar
          > cosmic rays. Conversely, an inactive sun will allow more cosmic
          rays
          > to penetrate deeper into the solar system, and therefore reach
          Earth.
          > According to the article, more cosmic rays means, at least
          > theoretically, more clouds.
          >
          > So, an inactive sun could have a double-whammy on Earth's climate!
          > One, decreased solar energy output will obviously mean less energy
          > getting to Earth. That means cooling for Earth. Now, we can
          possibly
          > add in the effect of more cosmic rays meaning more cloud cover,
          which
          > will further reduce the amount of solar energy reaching the Earth's
          > surface. More cooling! One could easily see how an extended period
          > of solar inactivity could lead to an ice age!
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.