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Re: cyclones, typhoons, hurricanes

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  • Mike Doran <mike@usinter.net>
    I can. But please wait a few days for an answer. I am talking with a couple of people who wrote papers recently published in Nature mag by email and am
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 28, 2003
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      I can.

      But please wait a few days for an answer. I am talking with a couple
      of people who wrote papers recently published in Nature mag by email
      and am putting in the time to do that--so I am a bit detracted.

      I talk about TS EMFs real time as they occur. The most important
      cirrus moving aspect is that the eye has negative concentrations of
      ions and the disk around the eye will find protons attracted. B-1
      and I have noted an upswing in solar proton winds with TSs--so these
      winds must be attracted to the core negative charge and surround it.
      The eye is fair weather so positive voltages go to ground from there.

      The large positive change in the ionosphere allows there to be a
      large positive charge in the high cloud tops where cirrus form. This
      allows the cirrus to be attracted to the ionosphere, which remains
      relatively more negative than the cloud top.

      Cirrus have very strong IR trapping qualities. The result is rising
      air, and an uplifting effect, which creates the center low.

      Extra tropical storms tend to have their positive and negative
      regions in lines--and the current outflows in waves. The thermal
      stratification, hence, varies.

      That's enough to make your head spin. Why don't you follow with
      questions on this answer to give me more time to respond more fully
      to your specific questions.

      Mike

      --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "swezlex2 <swezlex2@y...>"
      <swezlex2@y...> wrote:
      > Can any of you explain some of this in terms of electricity and
      cloud
      > formation?
      >
      > * Hurricanes and tropical systems have no fronts.
      > * Hurricane winds weaken with height
      > * The centers of hurricanes are warmer than their surroundings
      > * Hurricanes and tropical systems form under weak high-altitude
      winds.
      > * Air sinks at the center of a hurricane
      > * Hurricanes' main energy source is the latent heat of
      condensation
      > * Hurricanes weaken rapidly over land
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