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Re: [Methane Hydrate Club] Wind orientation and SOI--strong solar activity cause

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  • David <b1blancer1@earthlink.net>
    ... shifts ... I think I can answer this part. The solar wind, which is a stream of particles, carries a magnetic field along with it. Please do not ask me
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 11, 2002
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      > Mike, OK where is this solar wind and where does it go to when it
      shifts
      > from North to South. Does it move toward earth from the Sun and shifts
      > to hit the earth in a more North or south spot which it then takes to go
      > toward that pole?

      I think I can answer this part. The solar wind, which is a stream of
      particles, carries a magnetic field along with it. Please do not ask
      me how that works. I have no idea. Anyway, think of the solar wind
      as a bunch of tiny bar magnets flying towards earth. Now, here's
      where it may get a little confusing. The Earth's magnetic NORTH pole
      is actually at the SOUTH geographic pole, as Mike said. So, if the
      tiny little bar magnets of the solar wind strike Earth's magnetic
      field with their NORTH pole pointing towards Earth's NORTH MAGNETIC
      pole, which is actually the SOUTH geographic pole, they will have the
      same alignment as Earth's magnetic field, and have the effect of
      reinforcing it. This will enhance Earth's protection against the
      solar wind, and therefore supress geomagnetic activity.

      However, if the solar wind arrives with its NORTH pole pointing
      towards the Earth's SOUTH maagnetic pole, which is at the NORTH
      geographic pole, they will be aligned OPPOSITE to Earth's magnetic
      field. This will have the effect of weakening the magnetic field, and
      allow the solar wind to penetrate deeper into the magnetic field.
      What happens then is that you have electrons accelerated down Earth's
      magnetic field lines, which come crashing down at the poles. This
      causes geomagnetic storm activity, and aurora.

      The north or south pointing orientation can vary in intensity, and is
      measured in nano-Telsas.

      Now, Those little solar wind magnets move around through three
      dimensions, and can arrive end-on, or perpendicular to Earth's
      magnetic field lines (therefore having no effect), or exactly aligned
      with Earth's magnetic field lines, or an infite number of orientations
      in between. There's a fairly complicated formula that is used to
      calculate the net effect on Earth's magnetic field depending on the
      exact three-dimensional magnetic orientation of the solar wind, and
      the output of that formula is the IMF Orientation that you see in my
      solar activity reports.

      There, clear as concrete?
    • Mike Doran <mike@usinter.net>
      Great way of talking about it there, David. I notice with tonight s SOI (southern oscillation index) (think ENSO winds, not SSTs) is around 12 and slowly
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 11, 2002
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        Great way of talking about it there, David.

        I notice with tonight's SOI (southern oscillation index) (think ENSO
        winds, not SSTs) is around 12 and slowly dropping but more of
        interest BOTH East and West in the trop Pac the BP rose . . . with
        the lowered solar activity.

        --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David <b1blancer1@e...>"
        <b1blancer1@e...> wrote:
        >
        > > Mike, OK where is this solar wind and where does it go to when it
        > shifts
        > > from North to South. Does it move toward earth from the Sun and
        shifts
        > > to hit the earth in a more North or south spot which it then
        takes to go
        > > toward that pole?
        >
        > I think I can answer this part. The solar wind, which is a stream
        of
        > particles, carries a magnetic field along with it. Please do not
        ask
        > me how that works. I have no idea. Anyway, think of the solar wind
        > as a bunch of tiny bar magnets flying towards earth. Now, here's
        > where it may get a little confusing. The Earth's magnetic NORTH
        pole
        > is actually at the SOUTH geographic pole, as Mike said. So, if the
        > tiny little bar magnets of the solar wind strike Earth's magnetic
        > field with their NORTH pole pointing towards Earth's NORTH MAGNETIC
        > pole, which is actually the SOUTH geographic pole, they will have
        the
        > same alignment as Earth's magnetic field, and have the effect of
        > reinforcing it. This will enhance Earth's protection against the
        > solar wind, and therefore supress geomagnetic activity.
        >
        > However, if the solar wind arrives with its NORTH pole pointing
        > towards the Earth's SOUTH maagnetic pole, which is at the NORTH
        > geographic pole, they will be aligned OPPOSITE to Earth's magnetic
        > field. This will have the effect of weakening the magnetic field,
        and
        > allow the solar wind to penetrate deeper into the magnetic field.
        > What happens then is that you have electrons accelerated down
        Earth's
        > magnetic field lines, which come crashing down at the poles. This
        > causes geomagnetic storm activity, and aurora.
        >
        > The north or south pointing orientation can vary in intensity, and
        is
        > measured in nano-Telsas.
        >
        > Now, Those little solar wind magnets move around through three
        > dimensions, and can arrive end-on, or perpendicular to Earth's
        > magnetic field lines (therefore having no effect), or exactly
        aligned
        > with Earth's magnetic field lines, or an infite number of
        orientations
        > in between. There's a fairly complicated formula that is used to
        > calculate the net effect on Earth's magnetic field depending on the
        > exact three-dimensional magnetic orientation of the solar wind, and
        > the output of that formula is the IMF Orientation that you see in my
        > solar activity reports.
        >
        > There, clear as concrete?
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