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Re: Extreme weather, MHs, electrical asp

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  • Pawnfart
    I suggest that the methanogens have evolved to the new reality of the input of sediments and fresh water. But initially, the change of the river had strong
    Message 1 of 702 , Feb 1, 2001
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      I suggest that the methanogens have evolved to
      the new reality of the input of sediments and fresh
      water. But initially, the change of the river had strong
      consequences on the habitat. But understand, methangens also
      thrive deep below the surface, and in the methane
      hydrate fields that predominate the Gulf of California
      and thrive in the oceans around the world. There are
      more methane hydrate fields than coal fields, for
      instance. <br><br>Likewise, there has been damming of the
      Orinico river, a river that impacts the southern basin of
      the Gulf of Mexico, and in my view, in so doing
      "shifted" the hurricane season late and allowed Mitch and
      the December flooding during the traditional dry
      season to occur in Venezuala. But even with new flow
      rates, the impact of the dam construction on the Orinico
      will be short termed, because the methanogens will
      evolve to a new equillibrium of methane hydrate and gas
      fields, and sediment and fresh water flow into the
      basins. This notion sheds light on what current hurricane
      forecasters are saying:<br><br>The Active 1995-2000 Hurricane
      Seasons and Global Warming
      <br><br><a href=http://tropical.atmos.colostate.edu/forecasts/2001/fcst2001/index.html target=new>http://tropical.atmos.colostate.edu/forecasts/2001/fcst2001/index.html</a> <br><br>"Some may interpret the recent large
      upswing in Atlantic hurricane activity (since 1995) as
      being in some way related to increased human-induced
      greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). Such an
      interpretation of the recent sharp upward Atlantic hurricane
      activity since 1995 is not plausible. By contrast, the
      tropical cyclone activity in the other global basins has
      shown a downward trend since 1995. See our 21 November
      2000 verification on this Web site for more
      discussion. " <br><br><br>If you go to Dr. Gray's CSU link
      you will see that he is 10 times as verbose as I
      am--and my predictions over the last three years on
      various bbs have been more accurate. Dr. Gray finds NO
      link between climate change and hurricanes! So where
      do the insurance companies get off? People are
      paying THOUSANDS of dollars more in premiums, and the
      predictions of the top experts say there is no connection.
      <br><br>The landfalling 'canes over the past 5 years we have
      had have been higher. So they don't buzz saw.
      Briefly, I suspect this is related to electrical
      properties of the oceans as it interplays with higher CO2
      dissolved into ions in the air, as measured by the
      lower/cooler ionosphere (about 5 miles based on radiosound
      data). However, this makes the canes that hit further
      south big time flooders, and has created conditions
      where landfalling further north may be less likely. I
      also think that methane hydrates can change the
      occurrance of the ITZ, changing when landfalling may occur.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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