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A question for "Dr". Walt.

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  • pawnfart
    If you want to unsubscribe, I am not sure you did it correctly. But that isn t my question. My question I asked before, unanswered, is what is your PhD?
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 5, 2002
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      If you want to unsubscribe, I am not sure you did it correctly. But
      that isn't my question.

      My question I asked before, unanswered, is what is your PhD? What,
      IOW, do you teach?

      ++++++++

      Here is a specific comment from last year where a substantive
      discusssion did occur on another bb regarding EMFs and what is
      discussed here. I posed it to B-1 and we didn't get to far. This is
      the type of question I was hoping someone like you could help us out
      with but it appears that you aren't who you say you are:

      (quoting B-1 solar CME data):


      Solar wind speed : 664.5 km/sec Solar wind density : 5.3 protons/cc
      Solar wind pressure : 3.9 nPa

      <SNIP>

      Me again:


      "What I think you should note more then anything is the proton stream
      from the sun, because these are particles that will be sorted by
      SSTs. "

      Alan from OZ writes:


      "Mike what I want you to note, is just how small this flux of protons
      appears to be to this dimbo technician. And if this is the solar wind
      before hitting the earth's surface, then presumably not all of these
      charges even make it to the earth.

      ***I really do need a physicist's comment here, **** if i=q/t, (where
      i = current in amps, & q = quantity of electric charges in Coulombs)
      and if the electrical charge on a electron is about 1.602 x 10^-19
      coulombs, then we need to move: 1 / 1.602 x 10^-19C per sec to pass
      1Amp of current. Or 6.24 x 10^18 electrons must be moved for a
      current of 1A.

      The solar wind protons moving in a "tube" of space of csa 1cm^2 @
      664. km/s above would only move 5.3 x 664.5 x 1000m charges, or 3.52
      x 10^6 protons. If this calc. is correct, then you should be able to
      see that this is a *very small* movement of charges/second compared
      to even 1 ampere. [John L. please comment] {my comment inserted--
      another poster in the conversation who is a physics head}

      It seems to me that you are seeing something here that is a form of
      "number blindness". "

      Comments? How would the SE organize these charges? SSTs? Strikes
      caused by convection in relation to current movement in the
      ionosphere? Induction of currents in the ionosphere from daily
      expansion and contraction? QBO (50 mb winds of ions that move about
      90 mph)?
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