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Re: More Sun Junkscience--Gaia fights back

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  • b1blancer_29501
    ... the ... of ... and ... There may not be a good theory on exactly how it works, but stars can vary their total energy output dramatically. There are even
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 28, 2002
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      >
      > Which leads me to the ridiculas speculation in the above linked
      > research story. On large timescales, there is no good theory why
      the
      > sun, which makes its heat deep inside itself with the nuke process
      of
      > turning H2 to Helium, should vary its lumenousity. Indeed, math
      > rules like the law of large numbers would lead to a conclusion of
      > physical constancy of output. What we do know about the sun from
      > DIRECT observations is that its lumenousity output varies little
      and
      > that its ion particle output varies according to its magnetic field
      > rotation.
      >

      There may not be a good theory on exactly how it works, but stars can
      vary their total energy output dramatically. There are even
      classifications of stars that are know as variable stars. Thankfully
      our sun isn't one of them, or we wouldn't be here now. Nevertheless,
      there's nothing to say that our sun might not vary its output to some
      degree over thousands of years. Keep in mind that we've only been
      observing the sun for a very short time. We really have no idea of
      what solar cycles might exist that could take thousands or even
      millions of years to unfold.

      I've mentioned this before, but a recent survey of stars of similar
      size, age, and chemical composition to our own sun showed a rather
      striking array of various energy output levels, with some of them
      being as much as 30% brighter or dimmer than our sun. That would
      suggest that sun-like stars might be capable of some rather dramatic
      variances in energy output.

      I simply don't believe that we have been observing the sun long enough
      to get a really good idea of all of the processes and cycles that are
      at work. Gaia notwithstanding, you surely must realize that any
      significant changes in solar energy output will have profound effects
      on Earth.
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