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Cyclone Adolph

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  • Pawnfart
    Let me put the paradox in electrical terms. The warmer the conducter, the greater the resistance. Thus, during an ice age, despite the fact that the oceans
    Message 1 of 702 , May 30, 2001
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      Let me put the paradox in electrical terms. The
      warmer the conducter, the greater the resistance. Thus,
      during an ice age, despite the fact that the oceans
      SHOULD cause less precipitation because they are colder,
      indeed there is enough energy for more ice to be laid on
      the land then what melts. <br><br>Pole reversals
      clearly would be most significant near Antarctica, where
      cirrus activity is reduced by the inducting eastward
      moving ocean currents there on hte Antarctic Circumpolar
      current, where some of the largest waves and fastest winds
      blow. A pole reversal turns that current into a cirrus
      making machine, and no doubt puts huge quantities of ice
      and snow on Antarctica, which at this time is a
      vertual desert. This additional snow will increase the
      salinity of the oceans, also making the oceans MORE
      conductive, saying nothing what a pole reversal does to
      precip patterns near other glacier prone areas. It
      should be noted that the earth's magnetic field has
      reversed 8 times in the past 2 million years, and that the
      earth's magnetic field, as measured by some experts, has
      declined 10% over the past 150 years. By itself, this
      changes the way ocean and ionospheric movements induct
      electrical currents and alter cirrus cloud formation.
      <br><br>Again, my point all along has been that methanogen
      activity, which depends on CO2 as they breath it along with
      H2 to make methane and river activity, which also
      feeds these methanogens via symbiotic relations with
      other microbes, will change the electrical balances,
      and increases probability of non-linear change in
      what is clearly demonstrated by history to be a
      non-linear climate modulated system. <br><br>One thing that
      Lindzen has shown without a shadow of doubt is that the
      warmer the ocean, as a conducter, the more resistance to
      electrical induction there will be. This in a way explains
      the occurance of ENSO or the El Nino cycle over the
      past several thousand years, and how its intensity
      decreased during the Little Ice Age--colder waters allow
      the oceans to be more important in the induction that
      occurs than the flaring and the daily movement of the
      ionosphere.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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