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More on China Dust Bowl/Three Gorge

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  • Pawnfart
    As many of you know, I question hydro. Here is the latest link respecting the largest in the world, the Three Gorge, where water has already been diverted, and
    Message 1 of 702 , May 25, 2001
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      As many of you know, I question hydro. Here is
      the latest link respecting the largest in the world,
      the Three Gorge, where water has already been
      diverted, and a dust bowl in China:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.knoxstudio.com/shns/story.cfm?pk=CHINADUST-05-23-01&cat=AN target=new>http://www.knoxstudio.com/shns/story.cfm?pk=CHINADUST-05-23-01&cat=AN</a> <br><br>b Comments: <br><br>The Dust Bowl in
      China is directly related to China Dam construction.
      See <a href=http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/3gorge.html target=new>http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/3gorge.html</a>
      <br><br>I would add that there are several west moving
      currents near China, to include the Oyashio, that with
      methanogen activity in health producing insulation of
      methane hydrates in counter currents at depths of this
      current, more cirrus enhancement takes place. I would
      point out that the sea adjoining this current STILL
      contains ice, when normally it is ice free by the end of
      March. Other than allowing some sed and flow rates down
      the Yangtze river, or stopping the retaining of
      sediments at the delta, I don't think planting trees is
      going to stop the dust bowl. Perhaps the only thing
      that might intervene would be solar flaring pattern
      changes that evoke an El Nino, which according to Daly's
      site, should occur next in 2003. Flaring also has a
      cirrus enhancing effect, where applying Fleming's left
      hand rule to moving ionosphere, which increases about
      2% from peak of flaring to valley, thereby changing
      an upward vector of electrical current that moves
      cirrus beyond the electrical effects of moving ocean
      currents. <br><br>The problem compares to our damming our
      rivers in the 20s and 30s--see:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/lakeact.html target=new>http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/lakeact.html</a> <br><br>I would also point out from a Gaia earth
      perspective, dust flowing to the oceans should add to the
      methanogens habitat. <br><br>I would further add that the
      African dust that Florida gets would not be as
      significant should the ocean be getting more cirrus
      enhancement and therefore cleansing rains prior to the dust
      reaching Florida. (The same could be said for the fact
      that the China dust reached the US.) <br><br>So,
      because of dams in West Africa and Venezuela, when
      seasonal spring winds blow dust, the rain isn't there to
      counteract this, and it isn't there because the dams are
      decreasing detritus that flows to the oceans. South Florida
      is gripped in a horrid drought, and the drought can
      be directly traced to lack of cirrus formation
      related to the dams. Later in the season, when dammed
      water is released, cirrus formation is enhanced--only
      too late for Florida, but not late enough so that
      wind patterns cause flooding events like Mitch,
      Venezuela, and Kevin.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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