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Rising ocean levels

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  • Pawnfart
    I have been thinking alot about the problem of the melting Antarctica and substantial sea level increases and I am not so sure I buy it. I certainly disagree
    Message 1 of 702 , May 17, 2001
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      I have been thinking alot about the problem of
      the melting Antarctica and substantial sea level
      increases and I am not so sure I buy it. I certainly
      disagree with the IPCC on this. Antarctcia has had glacial
      ice for tens of millions of years.<br><br>Check out
      this link again:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.oceansonline.com/images/currents.gif target=new>http://www.oceansonline.com/images/currents.gif</a> <br><br>If indeed ocean temperatures rise
      substantially from more methane hydrates in the ocean,
      insulating more counter currents at depths, then the oceans
      also as warmer induct current poorly, as well as the
      melting glaciers that does occur dilutes the oceans. This
      dilution also makes the oceans conduct less well.
      <br><br>As that link in my above post indicates, the earth's
      magentic feilds have decreased 10% in the last 100 years.
      (This is a far faster time scale then the time required
      to melt Antarctica, if looked at linearly.)
      Understand that the magnetic pole has flipped 8 times in the
      last two million years, the last occurring roughly
      with our species emergance from Africa, about 260,000
      years ago. Now, even a slight change in the magnetic
      field is going to change how flaring and ocean currents
      induct the electrical currents that sustain cirrus, much
      less how methane hydrates further order how this goes
      on by insulating ocean waters. Put another way,
      there is a biological reason why the methanogens would
      flip the magnetic field if one takes a timescale level
      step back. Anyway, if the pole flips, the Antacrtic
      Circumpolar shown in the link above, now using Fleming's left
      hand rule, is a cirrus maker and not a cirrus reducer.
      As it stands right now, Antarctica is a vertual
      desert. With a Circumpolar current roaring around
      Antarctica making cirrus, it would be a heckuva different
      story, and it should lay glacial ice like CRAZY. This
      says NOTHING about the Berring, Alaska and California
      currents, which would be the ones that would lay the first
      of the North American glacial ice (this was was was
      first laid in the Wisconsonian). I should point out
      that as cold as Siberia is today, it didn't have
      glaciers like North America! It is obviously ocean current
      driven. The coastal Labrador would also make cirrus, asw
      sould the North Atlantic and the Gulf stream moving
      toward England. One could clearly predict where glacier
      would and did form just based on pole flip and cirrus
      changes as a result therefrom. <br><br>The oceans after
      such glaciers where formed would be more saline and
      cold--and better able to conduct electrical current and I
      suspect this recharges your earth magnetic fields--and
      they flip back to the more historically predominate
      north.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1 9:47 PM
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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