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Re: (meteorobs) British bolide last night - some videos & reports

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  • Mike Hankey
    Observers, I updated Bob s post about this fireball with a witness map. Whenever I hear UK fireball I think about wet meteorites, but looking at these reports
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 5, 2012
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      Observers,

      I updated Bob's post about this fireball with a witness map.

      Whenever I hear UK fireball I think about wet meteorites, but looking
      at these reports its possible this may have made landfall NW of
      London.

      There were several fragmentation & sonic boom reports.

      Here is the witness map:

      http://www.amsmeteors.org/2012/03/fireball-over-the-united-kingdom-march-3-2012/

      Thanks,

      Mike

      On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 12:24 AM, Robert Lunsford <lunro.imo.usa@...> wrote:
      > The American Meteor Society has so far received approximately 125 reports of this fireball over the United Kingdom. This event occurred near 21:40  GMT (9:40pm) on Saturday evening March 3rd. Reports of many different colors of this object have been received, with orange being most mentioned.  The average brightness reported by witnesses was in excess of the light produced by a full moon. This fireball lasted an extraordinary long time, up to 20 seconds as reported by some observers.
      >
      > Summaries of this event may be seen in the AMS Fireball table for 2012 at:
      >
      > http://www.amsmeteors.org/fireball2/public.php?start_date=2012-01-01&end_date=2012-12-31
      >
      > Refer to event #322.
      >
      > Clear Skies!
      >
      > Robert Lunsford
      > American Meteor Society
      >
      >
      > ---- dfischer@...-bonn.de wrote:
      >> Haven't seen anything here about a bolide over the U.K. last night that's
      >> causing lots of media attention over there:
      >> http://skyweek.wordpress.com/2012/03/04/brillianter-bolide-betorte-beeindruckte-briten
      >> compiles some videos and links to all the news stories I have located.
      >> Little detailled information yet though one report contains a '-9 mag.'
      >> estimate.
      >>
      >> Dan
      >
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    • Tony Markham
      SPA Meteor Section Director Alastair McBeath has now published an initial analysis of the reports of this fireball. This analysis (from 22:17 tonight) can be
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 5, 2012
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        SPA Meteor Section Director Alastair McBeath has now published an initial analysis of the reports of this fireball.

        This analysis (from 22:17 tonight) can be found at http://www.popastro.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=16810

        Tony


        From: "Skywayinc@..." <Skywayinc@...>
        To: meteorobs@...; tonymarkham832@...
        Sent: Monday, 5 March 2012, 17:13
        Subject: Re: (meteorobs) British bolide last night - some videos & reports

         
         
        In a message dated 3/5/2012 12:04:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, lunro.imo.usa@... writes:
         
        Perhaps the SPA has a more experienced audience compared to the AMS, especially in the British Isles. We would not expect the general public to be highly accurate with magnitude estimates. This is one reason we listed magnitude estimates in at least two step increments. Still, a majority of contributors will choose an estimate of "brighter than the full moon" regards of the true brightness.
         
         
         
        A week ago, when the 4-day old moon was in conjunction with Venus, I posed a question to a number of people: "Which appears brighter to you, the moon or Venus?"  Everyone who I asked said the same thing: "Venus."  But on that particular night, the moon was actually brighter by some 3.5 magnitudes (a brightness ratio 25 times that of Venus).  Of course, the reason that Venus was the overwhelming favorite was because it appears to the eye as a dazzling point, whereas the crescent moon's light was spread out over a half degree of sky.
         
        -- joe rao 



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