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Causalities and Epiphenomena, Laws and Noticings Part II

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  • david_dodds_2001
    Copyright 2008 David Dodds Causalities and Epiphenomena, Laws and Noticings Part II 1) remthis( function showTime ()/getTime(); , timedatestamp(), from
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 4, 2008
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      Copyright 2008 David Dodds
      Causalities and Epiphenomena, Laws and Noticings Part II

      1) remthis("function showTime ()/getTime();", timedatestamp(), from
      ("function showTime ()"), g00001);

      2) remthis("function getTime ()/var Now = new Date();/Seconds =
      Now.getSeconds();/Minutes = Now.getMinutes();/Hours = Now.getHours() +
      hroffset + Minutes / 60;",timedatestamp(),from("function getTime ()"),
      g00002);

      3)remthis("document.getElementById("seconds").setAttribute('transform',
      'rotate('+ (Seconds * 6) + ')'); /seconds /transform /rotate/Seconds",
      timedatestamp(),from("function showTime ()"), g00003);

      4) remthis("document.getElementById("hours").setAttribute('transform',
      'rotate(' + (Hours * 30) + ')');/ hours/ transform /rotate /Hours",
      timedatestamp(),from("function showTime ()"), g00004);

      (1 : 4 is the order that the info is pushed onto the stack, 1 first.)

      'remember this' function: remthis("char string", timedatestamp(),
      from("function name()"));

      The point of this, remthis( );, function is to record information
      which can be made into an intelligent activation record which is
      persistent AFTER the Context for the record has been popped off the
      Call Stack.

      example:

      "char string" ::
      "document.getElementById("hours").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('+
      (Hours * 30) + ')');/hours/transform/rotate/Hours",

      timedatestamp(), /* everybody knows what these are */

      from("function name()") :: from("function showTime ()"));
      /* from is used to remember which function the current code info was
      inside of */

      GENSYM unique serial number :: g##### /* LISP programmers know
      about GENSYM */



      remthis("document.getElementById("hours").setAttribute('transform',
      'rotate('+ (Hours * 30) + ')'); /hours /transform /rotate /Hours",
      timedatestamp(),from("function showTime ()"), g00004);


      Remember the discussion about Call Stacks? In computer operations many
      systems use the Call Stack amongst other things to organize the
      instructions and the data that are brought together to make programs
      work. In many programming systems functions are pushed onto the Call
      Stack as they are brought into play / run.

      The Call Stack mechanism has pointers into the Stack which point at
      various parts of the activation record that has been pushed onto the
      Stack. The pointers are used by programs to deal with the arguments
      that are in the string which makes up the called function. When a
      function is pushed onto the Stack it is said to be In Context, when it
      (eventually) is popped off the Stack it is said to go Out of Context.

      So, using the statements from 1 through 4 above we have a (first cut
      at the) Stack:


      (This following figure shows just the function name/args that are pushed)

      document.getElementById("hours").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('
      + (Hours * 30) + ')') <<===== TOP OF STACK
      document.getElementById("minutes").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('
      + (Minutes * 6) + ')')
      document.getElementById("seconds").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('
      + (Seconds * 6) + ')')
      function getTime ()
      function showTime () <<===== BOTTOM OF STACK

      Let me point out the spatial metaphors used there, and no I didnt
      originate the above language used to talk about the Call Stack mechanism.

      -We see 'call' as in calling out to someone, to summon someone, to
      invoke them to move from where they are to relocate to a different place;

      -'stack' a collection of (more or less planar) surfaces which are one
      above the other with their centers aligned;
      (the surfaces are like writeable surfaces, pieces of sheet paper or
      clay tablets etc)
      (the 'text' or 'character strings' which comprise the function name
      and argument information can be conceived of as either 'written onto
      the surface' of these writeable surfaces like paint on a wall, or
      carved into them / scribed / etched like cuniform tablets or monument
      text. (but note that nobody seems to conceptualize these 'surfaces'
      (which make up the stack) as being like punched (through) cards or
      player-piano rolls or Jaquard's original automated loom plates).

      -'pointers' are basically storage addresses, like ROM addresses, they
      are like a string which connects from the place where the address
      pointed at sits to the location which is the address pointed at or
      referenced. It may seem a stretch, this 'string' is a version of the
      concept of 'path'. This concept ('path') is one of the underpinnings
      of metaphorical representation of human thinking. We will see more
      about it in the future.

      -(activation) 'record' suggests a physical document, like a sheet of paper

      -'pushed' (onto the Stack), push is a force applied by a hand or other
      physical object against or 'upon' some other object , similar to press

      -'onto', (pushed onto the Stack), generally conceived of as some
      object being caused to move to contact another object from the above
      direction, but can really be from any direction (so its legitimately
      possible to put a sticky label onto a toy ball at the bottom of the
      ball using an upward direction of the label).
      Humans always use (often unconsciously) meta-data knowledge that is
      relevant to physical-objects and -forces they have experienced in the
      life to help them decide how to perform various physical operations.

      -'In Context', "When a function is pushed onto the Stack it is said to
      be In Context, when it (eventually) is popped off the Stack it is said
      to go Out of Context. ", the word "In" is usually used in context with
      a 'container', which like a circle or square may be two-dimensional or
      it may be a 3D thing like a (cardboard) 'box'. A Container is a
      spatial thing and usually is considered to have certain attributes
      associated with it, like size, morphology, sides (in-side, out-side,
      top-side (well in the Navy anyway), sometimes color, open or closed
      figure, wall-material and so on. We (humans) have a rich
      conceptual-association of qualities and attributes ABOUT the physical
      world, such as all real things have an extent (aka size), and soooo
      any object which has 'container' associated with it also gets all/many
      of the attributes of real physical objects that are examples of
      'container' associated with it too. (Think
      associated-metadata processing activity).

      -'Out of Context', "When a function is pushed onto the Stack it is
      said to be In Context, when it (eventually) is popped off the Stack it
      is said to go Out of Context.", the word "Out" is usually used in
      context with a 'container', which like a circle or square may be
      two-dimensional or it may be a 3D thing like a (cardboard) 'box'.

      -the 'Stack', is clearly used as though a container through the use of
      In and Out, and used as though an object having some extent (aka
      surface (area)) through the use of 'onto' and 'off (of)'.

      document.getElementById("hours").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('
      + (Hours * 30) + ')') <<===== TOP OF STACK
      document.getElementById("minutes").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('
      + (Minutes * 6) + ')')
      document.getElementById("seconds").setAttribute('transform', 'rotate('
      + (Seconds * 6) + ')')
      function getTime ()
      function showTime () /getTime ();", timedatestamp(),from("function
      showTime ()"), g00001); <<===== BOTTOM OF STACK



      /getTime (); The / means next item follows, it is a separator just
      the way commas are.

      getTime (); is the first item of content in the function: function
      showTime ().
      It is detected as being a function also.
      The content (being pushed) ends after getTime ();.
      The time and date are captured via timedatestamp(), and then the name
      of the program or function from which this particular remember-this
      data comes from is given: from("function showTime ()").

      Each remember-this data storing function is given a (unique) GENSYSM :
      g#####. The GENSYM is used as a unique ID and can have various
      kinds of things associated with it, including ANNOTATION. GENSYMs can
      be constituents in a symbol-table and paired-up-with or otherwise
      associated with data, ANNOTATION, referents/pointers, etc

      One of the things that the ANNOTATION might contain is a description
      of what the function accomplishes or 'does'. This info can be mined by
      'pattern based invocation' systems. The ANNOTATION can be used as the
      antecedent / forward chaining solution to a GOAL. It can be used as a
      context.

      These spatial 'treatments' have repercussions in both Aspect Oriented
      Programming situations (cross-cutting or insertion locations) and in
      processing (the meaning of) metaphor(s).

      In this episode we saw that the Call Stack may be used as the context
      container which 'has' (aka 'contains' when 'In') the activity
      description (ie the called function string) <after push>and doesnt
      'have' (aka {does} not[ 'contains' ] when 'Out') it <after pop>.

      Amongst the info that is extracted from the remthis( ) sequence is
      'hours', 'minutes', 'seconds'. (They are the IDs of SVG PATH elements
      in the Ontoclock program.)
      Also extracted is 'Hours', 'Minutes', 'Seconds'. (They are the
      variables of the Javascript program, dealing with the date-time (from
      the system clock).) 'rotate' and 'transform' are also extracted. When
      we use the NASA JPL SWEET ontologies to determine if any of these
      extracted variables has an ontological usage (ie "meaning") we find
      that they do. Next time we see what is 'discovered' by the system.

      Lakoff ('Metaphors We Live By' (book)) has spoken about conceptual
      metaphors. You see information about conceptual metaphors often in
      this Yahoo group. The name of this Yahoo group is Metaphorical Web.
      Lakoff's metaphor component, 'container', is based on partial
      structuring of information in an analogy description relating
      real-world container-things and concepts we have which we wish to
      communicate. Since few of us can use mental-telepathy usefully to do
      this we resort to speaking and writing, ie 'natural language', like
      English. Language can help us in our thinking but it can be clearly
      shown that we do not actually think in linguistic (language) elements,
      these elements are assembled by a mental process which can externalize
      mental concepts in the form of physical actions, such as speaking, and
      writing.
      (But also sign language, painting, drawing, operating a musical
      instrument all use the same externalization mental capability. So
      don't limit thoughts about it to just linguification.)
      We rarely examine the metaphors we use in daily life to think about
      things with. Here are some which we will visit again and elaborate upon.
      Container, name=head aliasname=skull contains=brain
      Container, name=brain aliasname=greymatter contains=mind
      Container, name=mind aliasname=awareness, me contains=thoughts
      thoughts and ideas are metaphorical objects and have the property
      of being-contained (in or via ('by'), and also have the property of
      movable / transportable).

      "What did you have in mind? Irving Bird didnt have clue, he didnt have
      any ideas, his head was empty. Could you give me a thought why that was?"

      The physical path in the real world is the basis of another 'atomic'
      or foundational spatial metaphor, the 'path' metaphor, also which we
      will visit again and elaborate upon.
      "SEEING IS UNDERSTANDING", What doth tomorrow bring?
      ((we 'see' with our "mind's eye", and it is 'located'
      ('occurs'/'runs') IN our 'mind' (container) ))
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