Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [metalshapers] Beginners first goal.

Expand Messages
  • Gordon Bartlett
    Pete I ll secound that . GMB ... From: William Longyard To: metalshapers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 10:49 PM Subject: Re: [metalshapers]
    Message 1 of 9 , May 1, 2012
      Pete
      I'll secound that .
       GMB
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 10:49 PM
      Subject: Re: [metalshapers] Beginners first goal.

       

      Pete,
      Buy this guy's video.  Single best video available, although there are many good videos out there.  In fact, I would suggest that the camcorder SAVED traditional metal shaping from being an all but extinct art.  Thanks to Ron Covell, Ron Fournier, and Kent White in America, thousands of us of were able to get a peek into the black art of metalworking and began to dabble.  Nevertheless, you've got to start somewhere and David's video is the best intro.
       
       
      Bill Longyard

    • pete lamberty
      Hi,   Once again, thanks for all of the advice.    Terry, I am sorry but I won’t be able to attend the metal meet weekend.  It looks like a great place
      Message 2 of 9 , May 4, 2012

        Hi,

          Once again, thanks for all of the advice. 

          Terry, I am sorry but I won’t be able to attend the metal meet weekend.  It looks like a great place to learn.

          I have that video, Bill.  It has a lot of info but I do need advice on where to start.  The video doesn’t tell me what is the best for a beginner to start with.  He makes everything look easy. 

          I think I will start with a bowl before I move onto the fender.  I am thinking I will make it out of either 3003 aluminum or the 20 gauge cold rolled mild steel that Gordon advises.  Do any of you have any thoughts as to the pros and cons of which metal I should use?  For some reason I am leaning toward the aluminum, but I don’t have a good reason for doing so.  I live near Chicago so finding the metal shouldn’t be too hard.  What type of business should I look up in the yellow pages, metal store?  How much should I buy?  Anything else I should be aware of?

          This next part is what I really need help with.  I got the feeling from my previous post, that I shouldn’t buy a hammer and dolly set.  If you agree with that, what tools and equipment will I need to make a bowl and then make a motorcycle fender for a car?

          Thanks to all of you for your advice.  It is really appreciated.  Pete

         

      • Varnell, John
        I would start with the 20 gage. No annealing needed, easier to get. For a bowl a small piece can be got at Home depot. Make sure you remember you need to do
        Message 3 of 9 , May 4, 2012

          I would start with the 20 gage. No annealing needed, easier to get.   For a bowl a small piece can be got at Home depot. Make sure you remember  you need to do both stretch in the middle and  tucking shrinking the edges.  Make many passes of both shrinks and stretches.

           

          The tucks can be made in a lot of ways.  For a small bowl I have two large punches welded together and a t handle welded across the back side.  When stretching the middle of the bowl tucks will form naturally also.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkaCJ5gC3jI

           


          John D. Varnell

           

          From: metalshapers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:metalshapers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of pete lamberty
          Sent: Friday, May 04, 2012 2:49 PM
          To: metalshapers@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [metalshapers] Beginners first goal.

           

           

          Hi,

            Once again, thanks for all of the advice. 

            Terry, I am sorry but I won’t be able to attend the metal meet weekend.  It looks like a great place to learn.

            I have that video, Bill.  It has a lot of info but I do need advice on where to start.  The video doesn’t tell me what is the best for a beginner to start with.  He makes everything look easy. 

            I think I will start with a bowl before I move onto the fender.  I am thinking I will make it out of either 3003 aluminum or the 20 gauge cold rolled mild steel that Gordon advises.  Do any of you have any thoughts as to the pros and cons of which metal I should use?  For some reason I am leaning toward the aluminum, but I don’t have a good reason for doing so.  I live near Chicago so finding the metal shouldn’t be too hard.  What type of business should I look up in the yellow pages, metal store?  How much should I buy?  Anything else I should be aware of?

            This next part is what I really need help with.  I got the feeling from my previous post, that I shouldn’t buy a hammer and dolly set.  If you agree with that, what tools and equipment will I need to make a bowl and then make a motorcycle fender for a car?

            Thanks to all of you for your advice.  It is really appreciated.  Pete

           

        • Rick Ollah
          Aluminum is easier to work. Nice to start with but you may get spoiled and not want to graduate to sheet steel. You will need several differnt types of
          Message 4 of 9 , May 4, 2012
            Aluminum is easier to work. Nice to start with but you may get spoiled and not want to graduate to sheet steel. You will need several differnt types of hammers, dollies blocks and the like. Everyone gets use to what ever hammers they purchase but I perfer wood handles. I like the balance and feel. My favorite ones are cut down versions of the store bought ones. As far as how much and where to purchase that will be up to you.
             
            Rick

            On Fri, May 4, 2012 at 2:49 PM, pete lamberty <petelamb@...> wrote:
             

            Hi,

              Once again, thanks for all of the advice. 

              Terry, I am sorry but I won’t be able to attend the metal meet weekend.  It looks like a great place to learn.

              I have that video, Bill.  It has a lot of info but I do need advice on where to start.  The video doesn’t tell me what is the best for a beginner to start with.  He makes everything look easy. 

              I think I will start with a bowl before I move onto the fender.  I am thinking I will make it out of either 3003 aluminum or the 20 gauge cold rolled mild steel that Gordon advises.  Do any of you have any thoughts as to the pros and cons of which metal I should use?  For some reason I am leaning toward the aluminum, but I don’t have a good reason for doing so.  I live near Chicago so finding the metal shouldn’t be too hard.  What type of business should I look up in the yellow pages, metal store?  How much should I buy?  Anything else I should be aware of?

              This next part is what I really need help with.  I got the feeling from my previous post, that I shouldn’t buy a hammer and dolly set.  If you agree with that, what tools and equipment will I need to make a bowl and then make a motorcycle fender for a car?

              Thanks to all of you for your advice.  It is really appreciated.  Pete

             


          • Gordon Bartlett
            Hi Pete If your not going to actually put this part to use on a car go with Aluminum #3003 - H14 /.063 . My understanding from others it takes approx a 1/3
            Message 5 of 9 , May 4, 2012
              
              Hi Pete
                        If your not going to actually put this part to use on a car go with Aluminum #3003 - H14 /.063 . My understanding from others it takes approx a 1/3 less time to work it compared to steel. Where to find . try the local machine shop or sheet metal shop {A/C Duct work} , the source they get their heavy solids or Galvanized sheet from. Just ask around and be able to explain the what you need by Alloy . I felt so foolish when I made my First order years ago not knowing what I specificly needed in their terminology .
                  I've experimented with hammer materials and types over the last few years , I like Steel headed hammer . Plastic isn't heavy enough to me to get force I want . For roughing out I've got some big steel headed hammers when it's a small area .If have a  large /wide area to move ,TM Tech wood headed Mega Mallet feels just right to me .
               Then I'm back to steel headed hammer smooth over and Plannish .
               My Choices are may not fit everyone ,we all have a like and dislike in our tools . Thats just my personnel choices. Theres a site  http://www.hammersource.com/  which I have purchased several hammers from over the years. If it's a hammer of some kind ,they probably have it .  
                   GordonB 
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, May 04, 2012 2:49 PM
              Subject: Re: [metalshapers] Beginners first goal.

               

              Hi,

                Once again, thanks for all of the advice. 

                Terry, I am sorry but I won’t be able to attend the metal meet weekend.  It looks like a great place to learn.

                I have that video, Bill.  It has a lot of info but I do need advice on where to start.  The video doesn’t tell me what is the best for a beginner to start with.  He makes everything look easy. 

                I think I will start with a bowl before I move onto the fender.  I am thinking I will make it out of either 3003 aluminum or the 20 gauge cold rolled mild steel that Gordon advises.  Do any of you have any thoughts as to the pros and cons of which metal I should use?  For some reason I am leaning toward the aluminum, but I don’t have a good reason for doing so.  I live near Chicago so finding the metal shouldn’t be too hard.  What type of business should I look up in the yellow pages, metal store?  How much should I buy?  Anything else I should be aware of?

                This next part is what I really need help with.  I got the feeling from my previous post, that I shouldn’t buy a hammer and dolly set.  If you agree with that, what tools and equipment will I need to make a bowl and then make a motorcycle fender for a car?

                Thanks to all of you for your advice.  It is really appreciated.  Pete

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.