Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Sahaja Samadhi

Expand Messages
  • freyjartist@aol.com
    Hi Nina I very much enjoyed reading this, and it moved me to share with you. you wrote:
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 3, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Nina

      I very much enjoyed reading this,
      and it moved me to share with you.

      you wrote:

      <<Who knows why it is so that I can
      tell someone 100 times to press the ball mount of their big toe
      firmly into the ground to get better balance and they finally hear it
      the 101th time through, exclaiming, at that time, oh!, as if it were
      a brand new piece of information.>>

      I've commented about this aspect to my teacher.
      How i know i've heard him say something
      many times but i was focusing on something else,
      so it didnt mean anything to me at that time....but then
      perhaps the next day when he says it and it 'clicks',  and there
      is an automatic movement in my body at that location--because
      that is where the body wants to go in that moment....
      that is where something is going on that wants to
      adjust or balance or move or expand or melt....

      The way he teaches is to speak very detailed, systematic
      directions non-stop,
      in a very consistent
      tone, timbre, volume, pace,  (the word 'drone' comes to mind)
      while he is one-pointedly focused on
      observing everyone in the classes'  postures.   He is not doing the
      postures himself....he is mostly padding around the room unobtrusively
      in the background, observing and speaking.   Although he will
      demonstrate poses if he feels it is needed.   It is not a rote thing....
      everytime is different.   

      Everyone in the class has their eyes open at all times, even in
      Savasana,  and focused straight
      ahead, either on a point on their forehead,  or wherever else the focus
      should be--like, for instance, in Standing Head to Knee pose, the focus
      is fixed on the standing knee, until eventually you can touch
      forehead to knee.

      The atmosphere is naturally very meditative--
      there is no talking by students before or during the class,  and people
      aren't checking each other out, except newbies to check out how poses
      are done when the spoken instructions aren't being fully understood.

      So what he is saying
      is coinciding with what he is seeing that needs attention brought to it,
      and i hear what i am needing to hear and it is as if it is coming from within me.
      Nothing he says seems out of place,  it is not distracting or irritating.

      <<Oh, and you might be tempted to
      think that once one has this 101th time realization, that it would
      stick. In actuality, even once realized, it may take much practice
      for the grounding of the big toe mount to become 'nature'.>>

      Yes, right.  The next day, your body may be working with other
      things.   And also,  due to the fact that
      the grounding of the big toe mount, or whatever
      else it is, has not yet become automatic,  conscious attention
      is called for in order to 'cement' that new habit.

      <<One of the things the practice of hatha yoga offers is the
      enhancement of physical mindfulness.>>

      Yes, very much so.
      For instance,  for example, when i am in Dandayamana-Dhanurasana
      (Standing Bow Pulling Pose),  i am focused on many things
      at the same time: body alignment; keeping my arm raised to a certain
      level;  keeping neck and shoulders relaxed;  gently pushing the raised
      leg back and reaching the arm and hand up and forward with equal
      attention and energy on each; when the leg can't be pushed back
      any more,  then it is raised upwards.   But all the time,  a fine balance
      between all these things is required to be able to stay in the pose
      without losing balance and falling.   

      <This is mindfulness of the depth
      of the body (can you sense your liver? can you sense your kidneys?
      your craniosacral respiration? your celullar respiration?) as well as
      the breadth of the body (can you maintain awareness of the grounding
      of the big toe mount as you externally rotate your other leg? can you
      maintain awareness of diaphragmattic breathing as you move through a
      series of asanas?). Physical mindfulness is cultivated through a
      process of physical inquiry, which uses 'sensation' as a starting
      point.>>

      Yes...one pose where i experience very direct communication
      with an organ (intestines) is the Wind Removing Pose (Pavanamuktasana).

      And, during poses and in briefly resting between poses,
      i can also feel internal massage of lungs, kidneys, liver, heart,
      pancreas, adrenals, thyroid, female organs.....diaphramatic
      breathing becomes automatic.....it's just wonderful.

      << 'Sensation' is also the endpiece, as the deeper and broader
      one goes into physical mindfulness, the more transparent the body
      becomes, the more the spaces between sensation become perceivable.>>

      Nice!

      <<This is the key to the relation between asana and meditation. The
      body dissolves in the same way the mind dissolves. It becomes clear
      that the two, mind and body, or meditation and asana, are 'one and
      the same'.>>

      Yes,  this is so well-said, Nina.  

      Just to share:  My favorite pose (as of yesterday, ha ha),  is
      the Toe Stand Pose (Padangustasana), because
      i am having fun with the balancing aspect,  
      taking on the challenge to one day be able to have both
      hands at chest in prayer position, no shaking--
      perfect balance.    I think one reason i might be drawn to
      this pose is because, as Bikram says,  it helps develop
      patience....and also good for knees, ankles and feet....
      structural areas that are sensitive on me.

      I also just loooovvvvveeeee Supta-Vajransana (Fixed Firm Pose)
      another knee, leg and ankle thing....

      Camel and Boat poses are perennial favorites,  well i could go on....

      Great discussing yoga with you, Nina....

      Freyja

      Nina



    • satkartar7
      ... this is new for me! I ve a teacher who likes to keep the eyes open [not during Savasana] and found out, that he was a Buddhist; who do meditate with the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, freyjartist@a... wrote:
        > Hi Nina
        >
        > I very much enjoyed reading this,
        > and it moved me to share with you.
        >
        > you wrote:
        >
        > <<Who knows why it is so that I can
        > tell someone 100 times to press the ball mount of their big toe
        > firmly into the ground to get better balance and they finally hear it
        > the 101th time through, exclaiming, at that time, oh!, as if it were
        > a brand new piece of information.>>
        >
        > I've commented about this aspect to my teacher.
        > How i know i've heard him say something
        > many times but i was focusing on something else,
        > so it didnt mean anything to me at that time....but then
        > perhaps the next day when he says it and it 'clicks', and there
        > is an automatic movement in my body at that location--because
        > that is where the body wants to go in that moment....
        > that is where something is going on that wants to
        > adjust or balance or move or expand or melt....
        >
        > The way he teaches is to speak very detailed, systematic
        > directions non-stop,
        > in a very consistent
        > tone, timbre, volume, pace, (the word 'drone' comes to mind)
        > while he is one-pointedly focused on
        > observing everyone in the classes' postures. He is not doing the
        > postures himself....he is mostly padding around the room unobtrusively
        > in the background, observing and speaking. Although he will
        > demonstrate poses if he feels it is needed. It is not a rote thing....
        > everytime is different.
        >
        > Everyone in the class has their eyes open at all times, even in
        > Savasana,



        this is new for me!

        I've a teacher who likes to keep the
        eyes open [not during Savasana] and
        found out, that he was a Buddhist; who
        do meditate with the eyes open but
        DO NOT LOOK! it is an invard unfocused
        gaze



        > and focused straight
        > ahead, either on a point on their forehead, or wherever else the focus
        > should be--like, for instance, in Standing Head to Knee pose, the focus
        > is fixed on the standing knee, until eventually you can touch
        > forehead to knee.
        >
        > The atmosphere is naturally very meditative--
        > there is no talking by students before or during the class, and people
        > aren't checking each other out, except newbies to check out how poses
        > are done when the spoken instructions aren't being fully understood.
        >
        > So what he is saying
        > is coinciding with what he is seeing that needs attention brought to it,
        > and i hear what i am needing to hear and it is as if it is coming from within
        > me.
        > Nothing he says seems out of place, it is not distracting or irritating.
        >
        <<Oh, and you might be tempted to
        > think that once one has this 101th time realization, that it would
        > stick. In actuality, even once realized, it may take much practice
        > for the grounding of the big toe mount to become 'nature'.>>
        >
        > Yes, right. The next day, your body may be working with other
        > things. And also, due to the fact that
        > the grounding of the big toe mount, or whatever
        > else it is, has not yet become automatic, conscious attention
        > is called for in order to 'cement' that new habit.
        >
        <<One of the things the practice of hatha yoga offers is the
        > enhancement of physical mindfulness.>>
        >
        > Yes, very much so.
        > For instance, for example, when i am in Dandayamana-Dhanurasana
        > (Standing Bow Pulling Pose), i am focused on many things
        > at the same time: body alignment; keeping my arm raised to a certain
        > level; keeping neck and shoulders relaxed; gently pushing the raised
        > leg back and reaching the arm and hand up and forward with equal
        > attention and energy on each; when the leg can't be pushed back
        > any more, then it is raised upwards. But all the time, a fine balance
        > between all these things is required to be able to stay in the pose
        > without losing balance and falling.
        >
        > <This is mindfulness of the depth
        > of the body (can you sense your liver? can you sense your kidneys?
        > your craniosacral respiration? your celullar respiration?) as well as
        > the breadth of the body (can you maintain awareness of the grounding
        > of the big toe mount as you externally rotate your other leg? can you
        > maintain awareness of diaphragmattic breathing as you move through a
        > series of asanas?). Physical mindfulness is cultivated through a
        > process of physical inquiry, which uses 'sensation' as a starting
        > point.>>
        >
        > Yes...one pose where i experience very direct communication
        > with an organ (intestines) is the Wind Removing Pose (Pavanamuktasana).
        >
        > And, during poses and in briefly resting between poses,
        > i can also feel internal massage of lungs, kidneys, liver, heart,
        > pancreas, adrenals, thyroid, female organs.....diaphramatic
        > breathing becomes automatic.....it's just wonderful.
        >

        << 'Sensation' is also the endpiece, as the deeper and broader
        > one goes into physical mindfulness, the more transparent the body
        > becomes, the more the spaces between sensation become perceivable.>>
        >
        > Nice!
        >
        <<This is the key to the relation between asana and meditation. The
        > body dissolves in the same way the mind dissolves. It becomes clear
        > that the two, mind and body, or meditation and asana, are 'one and
        > the same'.>>
        >
        > Yes, this is so well-said, Nina.
        >
        > Just to share: My favorite pose (as of yesterday, ha ha), is
        > the Toe Stand Pose (Padangustasana), because
        > i am having fun with the balancing aspect,
        > taking on the challenge to one day be able to have both
        > hands at chest in prayer position, no shaking--
        > perfect balance. I think one reason i might be drawn to
        > this pose is because, as Bikram says, it helps develop
        > patience....and also good for knees, ankles and feet....
        > structural areas that are sensitive on me.
        >
        > I also just loooovvvvveeeee Supta-Vajransana (Fixed Firm Pose)
        > another knee, leg and ankle thing....
        >
        > Camel and Boat poses are perennial favorites, well i could go on....
        >
        > Great discussing yoga with you, Nina....
        >
        > Freyja
        >
        > Nina


        thanks, Karta
      • Nina
        F Hi Nina ... Hello, and thanks for sharing, Freyja. N I ve commented about this aspect to my teacher. ... Right.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 4, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          F > Hi Nina
          >
          > I very much enjoyed reading this,
          > and it moved me to share with you.

          Hello, and thanks for sharing, Freyja.

          N <<Who knows why it is so that I can
          > tell someone 100 times to press the
          > ball mount of their big toe firmly
          > into the ground to get better balance
          > and they finally hear it the 101th
          > time through, exclaiming, at that
          > time, oh!, as if it were a brand
          > new piece of information.>>

          F > I've commented about this aspect to my teacher.
          > How i know i've heard him say something
          > many times but i was focusing on something else,
          > so it didnt mean anything to me at that time....but then
          > perhaps the next day when he says it and it 'clicks', and there
          > is an automatic movement in my body at that location--because
          > that is where the body wants to go in that moment....
          > that is where something is going on that wants to
          > adjust or balance or move or expand or melt....

          Right. It seems we are not linear in how our bodies store up
          information waiting for connections to be made. It seems we work from
          all directions towards that center where the connection, or the a-
          ha!, is made.

          Thanks for the description of your class and teacher's methods. It's
          always interesting for me to read perspectives on these things.

          F > So what he is saying is coinciding with what
          > he is seeing that needs attention brought to it,
          > and i hear what i am needing to hear and it is
          > as if it is coming from within me. Nothing he
          > says seems out of place, it is not distracting
          > or irritating.

          That's excellent, Freyja.

          N > <<One of the things the practice of hatha yoga offers is the
          > enhancement of physical mindfulness.>>

          F (with snip)> Yes...one pose where i experience
          > very direct communication with an organ (intestines)
          > is the Wind Removing Pose (Pavanamuktasana).

          Lol!

          We have a saying in this area, "If you touch someone, it's a
          blessing." We usually say it when we're about to move into reclining
          spinal twists or Supta Padangusthasanas where it is assured that
          someone in class will touch someone else. Who can explain the
          aversion we have to coming into physical contact with strangers or
          friends? Well, the saying helps people get over the aversion.

          I've always thought there should be another saying, "If you pass
          wind, it's a blessing." We would use it for twists and inversions and
          everyone could just chill out and toot till there was nothing left to
          toot. Really, air in and air out, that's cleansing, isn't it? :)

          > And, during poses and in briefly resting between poses,
          > i can also feel internal massage of lungs, kidneys, liver, heart,
          > pancreas, adrenals, thyroid, female organs.....diaphramatic
          > breathing becomes automatic.....it's just wonderful.

          Freyja, try resting in a long savasana (20 min plus with or without
          asana beforehand) and exploring your innards. First ground yourself
          in your breath, creating a very receptive quality in the body towards
          gravity and the breath. With the rhythm of the breath in place, begin
          a process of recognizing sensation, releasing it, and then following
          its absence down deeper into the body. Pulses are sensations, too, as
          are feelings of weightedness and contraction, etc. You might also
          discover the sensation of 'falling', or 'sliding with no grip'. It is
          the feeling of adhesions letting go. That's a tough one to let go,
          but see if you can do it, and see what lies beyond it.

          << 'Sensation' is also the endpiece, as the deeper and broader
          > one goes into physical mindfulness, the more transparent the body
          > becomes, the more the spaces between sensation become perceivable.>>
          >
          > Nice!
          >
          > <<This is the key to the relation between asana and meditation. The
          > body dissolves in the same way the mind dissolves. It becomes clear
          > that the two, mind and body, or meditation and asana, are 'one and
          > the same'.>>
          >
          > Yes, this is so well-said, Nina.
          >
          > Just to share: My favorite pose (as of yesterday, ha ha), is
          > the Toe Stand Pose (Padangustasana), because
          > i am having fun with the balancing aspect,
          > taking on the challenge to one day be able to have both
          > hands at chest in prayer position, no shaking--
          > perfect balance. I think one reason i might be drawn to
          > this pose is because, as Bikram says, it helps develop
          > patience....and also good for knees, ankles and feet....
          > structural areas that are sensitive on me.
          >
          > I also just loooovvvvveeeee Supta-Vajransana (Fixed Firm Pose)
          > another knee, leg and ankle thing....
          >
          > Camel and Boat poses are perennial favorites, well i could go
          on....

          :) Thanks for sharing, Freyja.

          Lately we've been having fun exploring arm balances. What could be
          more fun than something that, if you mess up, lands you square on
          your butt with your feet up in the air? Isn't that always the way!
          LOL! Quite humbling, but humorous.

          By the way, I did think of Bruce and Greg the other day while
          teaching Bakasana. After demonstrating the pose, I remained in it as
          everyone tried it out. I caught myself 'hanging out' in the pose, as
          I verbally adjusted people. Draw your navel to your spine! Tuck your
          tail! Lift your feet! Straighten your arms! We had a grand time. Next
          time, after the technical pieces are more in place, we'll work more
          on the introspective pieces.

          > Great discussing yoga with you, Nina....

          Yep, thanks!
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.