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Re: Sahaja Samadhi

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  • medit8ionsociety
    Nina wrote: snip ... Dear Nina, Thank you for this. It s very insightful and shows a skill level and knowledge that is obviously experiential
    Message 1 of 53 , Jul 3, 2003
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      "Nina" <murrkis@y...> wrote:

      snip

      > LOL, devi, yes, you would think so! Who knows why it is so that I can
      > tell someone 100 times to press the ball mount of their big toe
      > firmly into the ground to get better balance and they finally hear it
      > the 101th time through, exclaiming, at that time, oh!, as if it were
      > a brand new piece of information. Oh, and you might be tempted to
      > think that once one has this 101th time realization, that it would
      > stick. In actuality, even once realized, it may take much practice
      > for the grounding of the big toe mount to become 'nature'.
      >
      > One of the things the practice of hatha yoga offers is the
      > enhancement of physical mindfulness. This is mindfulness of the depth
      > of the body (can you sense your liver? can you sense your kidneys?
      > your craniosacral respiration? your celullar respiration?) as well as
      > the breadth of the body (can you maintain awareness of the grounding
      > of the big toe mount as you externally rotate your other leg? can you
      > maintain awareness of diaphragmattic breathing as you move through a
      > series of asanas?). Physical mindfulness is cultivated through a
      > process of physical inquiry, which uses 'sensation' as a starting
      > point. 'Sensation' is also the endpiece, as the deeper and broader
      > one goes into physical mindfulness, the more transparent the body
      > becomes, the more the spaces between sensation become perceivable.
      > This is the key to the relation between asana and meditation. The
      > body dissolves in the same way the mind dissolves. It becomes clear
      > that the two, mind and body, or meditation and asana, are 'one and
      > the same'.
      >
      > Nina

      Dear Nina,

      Thank you for this. It's very insightful and shows a
      skill level and knowledge that is obviously experiential
      as well as an ability to share it understandably...both of the
      qualities that go into the formula for a great teacher. I want
      to add that the classic "reason" to do Hatha Yoga is not to
      get ripped, strong, or even agile. It is important so one can
      sit in meditation without the body distracting you. So, in a way,
      'Sensation' is not the endpiece itself...the end of 'Sensation'
      is the endpiece, and the beginning of the sensational.

      Peace and blessings,
      Bob

      PS: In the past, I've been made aware (by my wife, a Hatha Yoga
      teacher for 25+ years), that sometimes when I present this concept,
      it comes out sounding like I am negating the value of Hatha Yoga.
      I hope that isn't the case now. Hatha Yoga is a wonder-full
      practice and experience. OK Bette?
    • texasbg2000
      ... Hi Dan: Always good to hear from you. If you decide to run for prez I will vote for you. Love Bobby G.
      Message 53 of 53 , Jul 15, 2003
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        >
        > You're welcome, and glad for the chuckle, Bobby.
        >
        > And yes, we must always keep in mind the
        > unrembemberable.
        >
        > Love,
        > Dan

        Hi Dan:

        Always good to hear from you. If you decide to run for prez I will
        vote for you.

        Love
        Bobby G.
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