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Re: Regarding Patanjali #5 - Bobby G.

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  • texasbg2000 <Bigbobgraham@aol.com>
    ... understand. Hi Tony: Thanksfor the interest. ... I return ... faster than I ... 80% of the ... I can t read them all either and if I missed responding to
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 3, 2003
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "tosime"
      <tosime@b...> wrote:
      > Hi Bobby,
      >
      > Thank you for the beautiful version that is now very easy to
      understand.

      Hi Tony:
      Thanksfor the interest.
      >
      > My thanks are a little delayed because I traveled over the weekend.
      I return
      > to find over 400 posts! What do I do? The posts appear to come
      faster than I
      > can read them! How do I home in on the 20% of posts that give me
      80% of the
      > daily development?
      >
      > Could Bob give us a sort of meditation highlights or summary?
      >
      > ...Tony

      I can't read them all either and if I missed responding to anyone i
      apologize.
      It would be easier to pick up responses if the threads were renamed
      after awhile.

      Love
      Bobby G.


      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: texasbg2000 <Bigbobgraham@a...> [mailto:Bigbobgraham@a...]
      > Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 1:53 AM
      > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Regarding Patanjali
      #5 -
      > Bobby G.
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Tony:
      >
      > Thanks for the reply. It's no trouble. The terminology is not
      > familar to many.
      >
      > Raja Yoga is called Classical Yoga and Patanjali invented it as far
      > as we know. It is about the concepts concerning the mind, its
      > functions and attributes. It is not Jnana yoga.
      >
      > When you are perfectly still you have the sense of I am. Thoughts
      do
      > not occur then. They could if you let them. As long as the I am is
      > current, thoughts are repelled. They try to arise and you know what
      > the thought would be if it did arise. But you don't entertain it.
      > You are not lost in it and swept into another and another and so on.
      > After this is successfully practiced for a few moments the feeling
      of
      > bliss or gladness is known in association with the state of I
      > amness. This is object oriented samadhi. The process may take
      > awhile to settle into.
      >
      > Any object can be used such as a mantra or the breath and so on, as
      > long as the object is held steady in the mind.
      >
      > After practicing for a while the bliss comes automatically. For me
      > it was the sun. It was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen and
      > I just about fell apart everytime I saw it. It is just amazingly
      > beautiful. Now it is music and dirt and just about everything.
      Your
      > child could probably explain this better than me. I think it is what
      > some refer to as love.
      >
      > So back to the sutra. If one does not continue to practice after
      > object oriented samadhi, then a plateau is reached and progess
      > slows. The sutra are intended I believe to help those who get stuck
      > at this point to understand that it can get even better.
      >
      > Thanks
      > Bobby G.
      >
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "tosime"
      > <tosime@b...> wrote:
      > > Hi Bobby,
      > >
      > > Thanks for posting this. I find it fascinating but I am not sure I
      > > understand it all.
      > >
      > > I know this is asking a lot but could you please give us a simpler
      > version.
      > > I am thinking of something along the lines of what I could say to
      > my 11 year
      > > old son - very simple English.
      > >
      > > I recall you came close to this in one of your previous posts...
      > >
      > > "...If I am fearful, then I am remembering something
      > > I am convinced is scary. It is just a thought. If I have a
      > > realization about myself or a fantasy it does not transport me to
      > > that place where it is real. I have to have the thought "me" and
      > put
      > > me in that place. It all changes in an instant if the telephone
      > > rings..."
      > >
      > > Except for 'realization' this would come quite close.
      > >
      > > Also, I liked the way you summarized the previous section as an
      > > introduction.
      > >
      > > Thanks...Tony
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: texasbg2000 <Bigbobgraham@a...> [mailto:Bigbobgraham@a...]
      > > Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:45 PM
      > > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Regarding Patanjali #5
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Everybody:
      > >
      > > I posted some thoughts on the first type of bliss described by
      > > Patanjali in an earlier post.
      > > "The crux of I.17 seems to be a description of the first stage of
      > > bliss after the restriction of the fluctuations. I.18 describes
      the
      > > next stage. Later."-bg
      > >
      > > Yoga Sutra translated by Feuerstein:
      > > I.18 The other type of enstasy (the second stage-bg) has a
      residuum
      > > of subliminal-activators; it follows the former, cognitive enstasy
      > > upon the practice of the presented idea of cessation.
      > > F. describes the 'presented idea of cessation' as- just in sleep
      > > there is a presented-idea of 'non-occurrence' so also in the
      higher
      > > stages of cognitive enstasy there is an awareness of the gradual
      > > inhibition of all presented-ideas.
      > >
      > > translated by Iyengar:
      > > I.18 The void arising in these experiences is another samadhi.
      > > Hidden inpressions lie dormant, but spring up during moments of
      > > awareness, creating fluctuations and disturbing the purity of the
      > > consciousness.
      > > Iyengar comments- Here Patanjali mentions another state of samadhi
      > in
      > > beween sabija and nirbija but does not name it. It is experienced
      > > with the cessation of all functions of the brain, leaving behind
      > only
      > > the residual samskaras (tendencies). The word used for this state
      > is
      > > virama pratyaya.
      > >
      > > BG-The first stage of bliss described by P. is object oriented and
      > > contains a sense of I amness, joy or cognitive awareness. In this
      > > second stage (I.18), (virama pratyaya), these fluctuation cease
      but
      > > the tendencies will arise again after the samadhi. This is not
      > final
      > > but a transition stage before what is called nirbija samadhi.
      > >
      > > Iyengar
      > > I.19 In this state, one may experience bodilessness, or become
      > > merged in nature. This may lead to isolation or to a state of
      > > loneliness.
      > > Iyengar explains this by showing that upon awakening from
      dreamless
      > > sleep the average person glimpses a non physical state of
      existence
      > > and also the state of merging in nature. In sleep these two
      phases
      > > remain unconscious until one wakes, whereas evolved souls
      > experience
      > > them consciously during samadhi. Sleep is a natural condition of
      > > consciousness; samadhi is a superconscious state.
      > >
      > > Iyengar
      > > I.20 Practice must be pursued with trust, confidence, vigour,
      keen
      > > memory and power of absorption to break this spiritual
      complacency.
      > > I. explains with some detail how one can be halted in the progress
      > > toward the last stage of development (nirbija samadhi) by
      remaining
      > > in the stage described in I.18. As does Feuerstein in his
      > commentary.
      > >
      > > Iyengar
      > > I.21 The goal is near for those who are vigorous and intense in
      > > practice.
      > >
      > > BG- I take this to mean not to stop the practice that got you
      there.
      > > Double up! Honor the pure (unadulterated) and honest in yourself
      > and
      > > others. Meditate. There is a state of bliss where the tendencies
      > > will still arise. But one can go past that state, once the method
      is
      > > ingrained, if one does not block it. He refers to this later in
      > > III.51 also, by admonishing against pride, etc.
      > >
      > > This post is what I said I would post on Pantanjali and bliss. To
      > > jump ahead to book II might clarify something.
      > >
      > > Feuerstein
      > > II.11 The fluctuations (immediate thoughts-bg) of the causes of
      > > afflictions (deeper tendencies-bg) are to be overcome by
      meditative-
      > > absorption.
      > >
      > > but before that:
      > > II.10 The causes of affliction, in their subtle form (as a
      > tendency-
      > > bg), are to be overcome by the process of Involution.
      > >
      > > BG-Involution is the practice of self inquiry, asking "Who am I?".
      > > Involution means to go back through the Ego, the tendency of
      > > separateness, to the real Self. Destroying this first tendency is
      > > what destroys all tendencies at their root.
      > >
      > > The manifestations of these tendencies are overcome or stopped by
      > > meditation.
      > >
      > > Bliss, consciousness, and what is real.
      > > Bobby G.
      > >
      > >
      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > meditationsocietyofamerica-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
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