Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: A Technique of Timeless Realization

Expand Messages
  • medit8ionsociety
    ... Yo Sri W, Hubert Benoit wrote what is considered by many to be a Zen masterpiece titled The Supreme Doctrine. In this case, he shares an exercise aimed
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 31, 2013
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      "walto" wrote:
      >
      > I like this a lot, Bob. Who is Hubert Benoit?
      >
      > W
      >
      Yo Sri W,

      Hubert Benoit wrote what is considered by many to be
      a Zen masterpiece titled The Supreme Doctrine.
      In this case, he shares an "exercise" aimed at helping
      One evolve in consciousness via a non-traditional to Zen
      method. It's quite a "good trip" as the hippies of old would
      have called it. Glad you liked it!

      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety wrote:
      > >
      > > This work must be carried out as a practical exercise
      > > undertaken at times when the subject can withdraw from
      > > the immediate excitations of the outer world.
      > >
      > > The exercise: Alone, in a quiet place, muscularly relaxed
      > > (lying down or comfortably seated), I watch the emergence
      > > within myself of mental images, permitting my imagination
      > > to produce whatever it likes. It is as though I were saying
      > > to my image-making mind, 'Do what you please; but I am going
      > > to watch you doing it.'
      > >
      > > As long as one maintains this attitude -- or, more exactly,
      > > this relaxation of any kind of attitude -- the imagination
      > > produces nothing and its screen remains blank, free of all
      > > images. I am then in a state of pure voluntary attention,
      > > without any image to capture it. I am not paying attention to anything in particular; I am paying attention to anything
      > > which might turn up, but which in fact does not turn up.
      > > As soon as there is a weakening of my voluntary effort of
      > > pure attention, thoughts (images) make their appearance. I do
      > > not notice the fact immediately, for my attention is momentarily asleep; but after a certain time I perceive what has happened.
      > > I discover that I have started to think of this and that.
      > > The moment I make this discovery, I say to my imagination,
      > > 'So you want to talk to me about that. Go ahead; I'm listening.' Immediately everything stops again, and I become conscious
      > > of the stoppage. At first the moments of pure attention are short. (Little by little, however, they tend to become longer.)
      > > But, though brief, they are not mere infinitesimal instants;
      > > they possess a certain duration and continuity.
      > >
      > > Persevering practice of the exercise gradually builds up
      > > a mental automatism which acts as a curb on the natural
      > > automatisms of the imagination. This curb is created consciously
      > > and voluntarily; but to the extent that the habit has been built
      > > up, it acts automatically.
      > >
      > > The principle of the liberative method is now clear.
      > > Man triumphs over his imaginative automatisms, not by
      > > pitting himself against them, but by consciously allowing
      > > them free play; his attitude towards them is one of active neutrality. His final triumph is the end-product of a struggle
      > > in which his voluntary attention does not itself have to
      > > take part. (Such participation, it may be added, is incompatible
      > > with its pure, impartial nature.) Man rules by dividing; refusing
      > > to take sides with any of his mental forces, he permits them to neutralize one another. It is not for Divine Reason to overthrow nature, but to place itself above nature; and when it succeeds
      > > in taking this exalted position, nature will joyously submit.
      > > (It should be noted that the curb which is imposed by the exercise
      > > on the automatisms of the imagination is not imposed by the opposition of Divine Reason to automatic nature, but by the opposition of one pole of our dualistic nature to the other pole.)
      > >
      > > During the exercise the subject, insofar as he practices it successfully, feels himself relieved from his fundamental
      > > distress. After the exercise he falls back into this distress,
      > > which may be momentarily greater than usual. The reason for
      > > this is that he has fallen back into his ordinary state of inner passivity, so that there is nothing to neutralize his distress;
      > > at the same time his imagination, curbed for a moment, does not
      > > at once recover its compensatory power. On the whole, however,
      > > the longer the exercises are repeated, the more the subject
      > > finds himself relieved of his basic distress.
      > >
      > >
      > > - Hubert Benoit
      > > -------------------------------------------------------------------
      > > Fair Use Notice: This document may contain
      > > copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically
      > > authorized by the copyright owners. I believe that
      > > this not-for-profit, educational use on the Web
      > > constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material
      > > (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law).
      > > If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes
      > > of your own that go beyond fair use, you must obtain
      > > permission from the copyright owner.
      > >
      >
    • Sanjiv Sahay
      Hello Bob, Thanks a lot for sharing this. I tried this technique and found it very effective in quietening the multitude of thoughts that usually race through
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2013
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Bob,
        Thanks a lot for sharing this.
        I tried this technique and found it very effective in quietening the multitude of thoughts that usually race through my mind when I try to meditate. Of course it didn't stop all thoughts - I noticed myself thinking of how effective this technique was and that I should thank the sender, but it was a huge step forward.
        Thanks again,
        Best regards,

        Sanjiv
      • medit8ionsociety
        Thank you Sri Sanjivji. You ve done the very best thing that can functionally produce a beneficial effect from a meditation technique, and that is to not just
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2013
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Thank you Sri Sanjivji.
          You've done the very best thing that can functionally
          produce a beneficial effect from a meditation technique,
          and that is to not just read or think or talk about it,
          but to actually do it. I'm glad you enjoyed it.
          Peace and blessings,
          Bob
          > Sanjiv Sahay wrote:
          >
          > Hello Bob,
          > Thanks a lot for sharing this.
          > I tried this technique and found it very effective in quietening the
          > multitude of thoughts that usually race through my mind when I try to
          > meditate. Of course it didn't stop all thoughts - I noticed myself thinking
          > of how effective this technique was and that I should thank the sender, but
          > it was a huge step forward.
          > Thanks again,
          > Best regards,
          >
          > Sanjiv
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.