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The Blank Screen Meditation

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  • medit8ionsociety
    Reality can only take place now. Now is the only time that things can really be experienced. And yet we spend virtually all of our time rehashing the past or
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 20, 2012
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      Reality can only take place now. Now is the only
      time that things can really be experienced. And yet
      we spend virtually all of our time rehashing the
      past or fantasizing about the future. We falsely
      think that we are experiencing our life as it takes
      place and that we understand what is real about our
      lives. Our senses present obstacles to understanding
      reality because of the fact that we are gathering
      our input through them and they are faulty mechanisms
      that operate a little too late and without enough precision.

      What we know of our environment is filtered through
      eyes that don't see as keenly as a hawk, ears that
      can't hear as well as a bat, noses and tongues that
      aren't as sensitive as a dog's and skin that is less
      sensitive to touch than a lizard. Our senses also don't
      work now. For instance, what you are reading now, you're
      not seeing now, but rather a split second late.

      It takes time for the light from the object you are
      perceiving to get to your eye, go through your lens to
      the retina, have the energy transferred to your optic
      nerve and finally be routed to your brain for analyzation.
      All of our senses operate slower than now and thus
      don't relay reality to us. Similarly, our minds aren't
      functioning now either. Our mental processes take time
      and are limited by subjective, subconscious influences
      continually.

      Think about how limited our sense of sight is compared
      to an atomic electron microscope and the Hubble telescope.
      While you can't physically see the infinite microcosm or
      macrocosm of the universe, you can envision them in your
      minds eye. Meditation is the mechanism that allows an
      inner control that makes this possible.

      Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing
      your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your
      senses operate when you are awake, and you react slave-like
      to their input. Your mind alone is in operation when
      you dream. Either awake or dreaming, we are limited,
      enslaved, and unreal. Meditation offers us the opportunity
      to experience Pure Consciousness that is not hampered
      by human limitations sensually or mentally and is capable
      of roaming the entire universe now. By stopping our mind
      and ceasing to allow it to take us from one unreality to
      another, we can experience true Reality.

      One type of meditation that deals with clearing out the
      unreal from our consciousness is the Blank Screen technique.

      Sit in a comfortable, quiet place, relax your body,
      close your eyes and simply be aware of your breath going
      in and out. No commenting, no judging, no comparing,
      just peacefully watch your breath. When you feel comfortable,
      place your attention on your minds-eye and watch what
      flows by. Just Witness -- do not react or analyze in
      any way. If you notice your mind chattering or your body
      twitching or your emotions stirring, do not chastise
      yourself -- simply say, "Oh, well", and go back to just
      observing. Your aim is to make your minds eye a blank screen.

      You can do this by either of two methods: By being patient
      and simply watching your minds eye non-reactively. It will
      soon tire and your mind will be clean, clear, and open
      to receive the present and with it, Reality which comes
      from and always contains Truth, Knowledge, and Bliss.

      The other method is to "fire" a weapon at the images
      that pop up in your minds eye. As something appears,
      send an energy bolt or a cannon ball or lightning, or
      whatever appeals to you at it, as if it was a target on
      a shooting range. Annihilate it and continue to shoot
      at whatever you see until the screen within is blank.

      Both of these techniques will benefit you in several
      ways: you will become familiar with what lies dormant
      in your subconscious and tends to habitually pop up.
      You will learn what is immediately "on your mind" and
      you will become aware of how you are reacting physically,
      mentally, and emotionally. This familiarity will lead
      to liberation from slave-like reactivity that drains
      you by making you squander energy fidgeting, emoting,
      and mentally chattering that is inappropriate, unreal,
      and unnecessary.

      While you are doing this meditation, you are acting,
      not simply slave-like reacting, and getting familiar
      with that which can control your mind, emotions, and
      body -- your Witness. This technique, like all meditations,
      takes place now and is done consciously and the more
      that we are experiencing now consciously, the more we
      are actually living life as it takes place. Try it -- you'll
      like it, and live happily ever after.
    • walto
      ... Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your senses operate when you are awake, and you react
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 21, 2012
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        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >

        "Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing
        your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your
        senses operate when you are awake, and you react slave-like
        to their input. Your mind alone is in operation when
        you dream."



        FWlittleIW, Sri Bob, that is not my (Bhuddist/Humean) take on the matter.

        As Chandrakirti states:

        "A chariot is not asserted to be other than its parts,
        Nor non-other. It also does not possess them.
        It is not in the parts, nor are the parts in it.
        It is not the mere collection [of its parts], nor is it their shape.
        [The self and the aggregates are] similar."

        And Padmasambhava states:

        "The mind that observes is also devoid of an ego or self-entity.
        It is neither seen as something different from the aggregates
        Nor as identical with these five aggregates.
        If the first were true, there would exist some other substance.

        "This is not the case, so were the second true,
        That would contradict a permanent self, since the aggregates are impermanent.
        Therefore, based on the five aggregates,
        The self is a mere imputation based on the power of the ego-clinging."

        http://awakeningtoreality.blogspot.com/2011/10/anatta-not-self-or-no-self.html


        W
      • medit8ionsociety
        ... Yo W, Interesting stuff! Not really over or under-standing exactly or even semi-exactly what the quotes are getting at or concluding. I did witness my
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 21, 2012
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          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "walto" <calhorn@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@> wrote:
          > >
          >
          > "Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing
          > your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your
          > senses operate when you are awake, and you react slave-like
          > to their input. Your mind alone is in operation when
          > you dream."
          >
          >
          >
          > FWlittleIW, Sri Bob, that is not my (Bhuddist/Humean) take on the matter.
          >
          > As Chandrakirti states:
          >
          > "A chariot is not asserted to be other than its parts,
          > Nor non-other. It also does not possess them.
          > It is not in the parts, nor are the parts in it.
          > It is not the mere collection [of its parts], nor is it their shape.
          > [The self and the aggregates are] similar."
          >
          > And Padmasambhava states:
          >
          > "The mind that observes is also devoid of an ego or self-entity.
          > It is neither seen as something different from the aggregates
          > Nor as identical with these five aggregates.
          > If the first were true, there would exist some other substance.
          >
          > "This is not the case, so were the second true,
          > That would contradict a permanent self, since the aggregates are impermanent.
          > Therefore, based on the five aggregates,
          > The self is a mere imputation based on the power of the ego-clinging."
          >
          > http://awakeningtoreality.blogspot.com/2011/10/anatta-not-self-or-no-self.html
          >
          >
          > W
          >
          Yo W,
          Interesting stuff! Not really over or under-standing
          exactly or even semi-exactly what the quotes are
          getting at or concluding. I did witness my thoughts
          being stimulated as they flowed by when I read the
          quotes, so a seed has been planted and I'm interested
          in how you would say this in Ameri-English if you
          feel inclined to share some commentary. And if not,
          "Never-mind" as is said in Zen practice. And that's,
          as St Martha would say "A good thing".
          Peace and blessings,
          Bob
        • walto
          ... I guess I m just (look at the two I s there!) in the no-self school, Bob. That is, I don t think there s any ME (or inner witness ) over and
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 21, 2012
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            --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "walto" <calhorn@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@> wrote:
            > > >
            > >
            > > "Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing
            > > your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your
            > > senses operate when you are awake, and you react slave-like
            > > to their input. Your mind alone is in operation when
            > > you dream."
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > FWlittleIW, Sri Bob, that is not my (Bhuddist/Humean) take on the matter.
            > >
            > > As Chandrakirti states:
            > >
            > > "A chariot is not asserted to be other than its parts,
            > > Nor non-other. It also does not possess them.
            > > It is not in the parts, nor are the parts in it.
            > > It is not the mere collection [of its parts], nor is it their shape.
            > > [The self and the aggregates are] similar."
            > >
            > > And Padmasambhava states:
            > >
            > > "The mind that observes is also devoid of an ego or self-entity.
            > > It is neither seen as something different from the aggregates
            > > Nor as identical with these five aggregates.
            > > If the first were true, there would exist some other substance.
            > >
            > > "This is not the case, so were the second true,
            > > That would contradict a permanent self, since the aggregates are impermanent.
            > > Therefore, based on the five aggregates,
            > > The self is a mere imputation based on the power of the ego-clinging."
            > >
            > > http://awakeningtoreality.blogspot.com/2011/10/anatta-not-self-or-no-self.html
            > >
            > >
            > > W
            > >
            > Yo W,
            > Interesting stuff! Not really over or under-standing
            > exactly or even semi-exactly what the quotes are
            > getting at or concluding. I did witness my thoughts
            > being stimulated as they flowed by when I read the
            > quotes, so a seed has been planted and I'm interested
            > in how you would say this in Ameri-English if you
            > feel inclined to share some commentary. And if not,
            > "Never-mind" as is said in Zen practice. And that's,
            > as St Martha would say "A good thing".
            > Peace and blessings,
            > Bob
            >

            I guess I'm just (look at the two "I"s there!) in the "no-self" school, Bob. That is, I don't think there's any ME (or "inner witness") over and above/other than my thoughts, memories, feelings, body, etc.

            That position has been very controversial for over a thousand years, of course, and--as I've often said here--I'm quite often wrong. But FWIW, I think one of the main (perhaps the most important) advance of Buddhism over earlier Vedantic thought, was getting off the whole Atman/Self thing.

            I'm sure there are people on this list with much more expertise/knowledge of the historical and doctrinal matters than I have, though. So, leaving those alone, I'll just say that, like Hume (and Parfit), I find no self--outside the passing show. Somehow comforting that take, too.

            Best,

            W
          • medit8ionsociety
            ... Yes W, I kinda, sorta saw my thoughts going towards a leaning towards a Buddhist vs Advaita Vedanta seeming conflict, as what you were pointing to. But
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 21, 2012
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              --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "walto" <calhorn@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "walto" <calhorn@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > > "Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing
              > > > your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your
              > > > senses operate when you are awake, and you react slave-like
              > > > to their input. Your mind alone is in operation when
              > > > you dream."
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > FWlittleIW, Sri Bob, that is not my (Bhuddist/Humean) take on the matter.
              > > >
              > > > As Chandrakirti states:
              > > >
              > > > "A chariot is not asserted to be other than its parts,
              > > > Nor non-other. It also does not possess them.
              > > > It is not in the parts, nor are the parts in it.
              > > > It is not the mere collection [of its parts], nor is it their shape.
              > > > [The self and the aggregates are] similar."
              > > >
              > > > And Padmasambhava states:
              > > >
              > > > "The mind that observes is also devoid of an ego or self-entity.
              > > > It is neither seen as something different from the aggregates
              > > > Nor as identical with these five aggregates.
              > > > If the first were true, there would exist some other substance.
              > > >
              > > > "This is not the case, so were the second true,
              > > > That would contradict a permanent self, since the aggregates are impermanent.
              > > > Therefore, based on the five aggregates,
              > > > The self is a mere imputation based on the power of the ego-clinging."
              > > >
              > > > http://awakeningtoreality.blogspot.com/2011/10/anatta-not-self-or-no-self.html
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > W
              > > >
              > > Yo W,
              > > Interesting stuff! Not really over or under-standing
              > > exactly or even semi-exactly what the quotes are
              > > getting at or concluding. I did witness my thoughts
              > > being stimulated as they flowed by when I read the
              > > quotes, so a seed has been planted and I'm interested
              > > in how you would say this in Ameri-English if you
              > > feel inclined to share some commentary. And if not,
              > > "Never-mind" as is said in Zen practice. And that's,
              > > as St Martha would say "A good thing".
              > > Peace and blessings,
              > > Bob
              > >
              >
              > I guess I'm just (look at the two "I"s there!) in the "no-self" school, Bob. That is, I don't think there's any ME (or "inner witness") over and above/other than my thoughts, memories, feelings, body, etc.
              >
              > That position has been very controversial for over a thousand years, of course, and--as I've often said here--I'm quite often wrong. But FWIW, I think one of the main (perhaps the most important) advance of Buddhism over earlier Vedantic thought, was getting off the whole Atman/Self thing.
              >
              > I'm sure there are people on this list with much more expertise/knowledge of the historical and doctrinal matters than I have, though. So, leaving those alone, I'll just say that, like Hume (and Parfit), I find no self--outside the passing show. Somehow comforting that take, too.
              >
              > Best,
              >
              > W
              >
              Yes W, I kinda, sorta saw my thoughts going towards
              a leaning towards a Buddhist vs Advaita Vedanta
              seeming conflict, as what you were pointing to.
              But personally, my person's presentation in this
              incarnation has had virtually, identically the
              same experiential events and "results" that methods
              of "Self-enquiry" as well as those of insight and
              mindfulness have initiated. To the so-called "me",
              both can be characterized as sticks that help the
              fire be stimulated and then are thrown into the fire
              to burn up with the rest of the kindling. And...Ah,
              the warmth, light, sounds, etc are then simply enjoyed.
            • aneternalnow
              I too have practiced self-inquiry and attain self-realization i.e. realized the I AM and Witness. Then further insights revealed more about the no-self
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 23, 2012
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                I too have practiced self-inquiry and attain self-realization i.e. realized the I AM and Witness. Then further insights revealed more about the 'no-self' nature: http://awakeningtoreality.blogspot.com/2007/03/thusnesss-six-stages-of-experience.html

                --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "walto" <calhorn@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "walto" <calhorn@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > "Your inner Witness is what is capable of observing
                > > > > your minds creations. It is always here, now. Your
                > > > > senses operate when you are awake, and you react slave-like
                > > > > to their input. Your mind alone is in operation when
                > > > > you dream."
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > FWlittleIW, Sri Bob, that is not my (Bhuddist/Humean) take on the matter.
                > > > >
                > > > > As Chandrakirti states:
                > > > >
                > > > > "A chariot is not asserted to be other than its parts,
                > > > > Nor non-other. It also does not possess them.
                > > > > It is not in the parts, nor are the parts in it.
                > > > > It is not the mere collection [of its parts], nor is it their shape.
                > > > > [The self and the aggregates are] similar."
                > > > >
                > > > > And Padmasambhava states:
                > > > >
                > > > > "The mind that observes is also devoid of an ego or self-entity.
                > > > > It is neither seen as something different from the aggregates
                > > > > Nor as identical with these five aggregates.
                > > > > If the first were true, there would exist some other substance.
                > > > >
                > > > > "This is not the case, so were the second true,
                > > > > That would contradict a permanent self, since the aggregates are impermanent.
                > > > > Therefore, based on the five aggregates,
                > > > > The self is a mere imputation based on the power of the ego-clinging."
                > > > >
                > > > > http://awakeningtoreality.blogspot.com/2011/10/anatta-not-self-or-no-self.html
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > W
                > > > >
                > > > Yo W,
                > > > Interesting stuff! Not really over or under-standing
                > > > exactly or even semi-exactly what the quotes are
                > > > getting at or concluding. I did witness my thoughts
                > > > being stimulated as they flowed by when I read the
                > > > quotes, so a seed has been planted and I'm interested
                > > > in how you would say this in Ameri-English if you
                > > > feel inclined to share some commentary. And if not,
                > > > "Never-mind" as is said in Zen practice. And that's,
                > > > as St Martha would say "A good thing".
                > > > Peace and blessings,
                > > > Bob
                > > >
                > >
                > > I guess I'm just (look at the two "I"s there!) in the "no-self" school, Bob. That is, I don't think there's any ME (or "inner witness") over and above/other than my thoughts, memories, feelings, body, etc.
                > >
                > > That position has been very controversial for over a thousand years, of course, and--as I've often said here--I'm quite often wrong. But FWIW, I think one of the main (perhaps the most important) advance of Buddhism over earlier Vedantic thought, was getting off the whole Atman/Self thing.
                > >
                > > I'm sure there are people on this list with much more expertise/knowledge of the historical and doctrinal matters than I have, though. So, leaving those alone, I'll just say that, like Hume (and Parfit), I find no self--outside the passing show. Somehow comforting that take, too.
                > >
                > > Best,
                > >
                > > W
                > >
                > Yes W, I kinda, sorta saw my thoughts going towards
                > a leaning towards a Buddhist vs Advaita Vedanta
                > seeming conflict, as what you were pointing to.
                > But personally, my person's presentation in this
                > incarnation has had virtually, identically the
                > same experiential events and "results" that methods
                > of "Self-enquiry" as well as those of insight and
                > mindfulness have initiated. To the so-called "me",
                > both can be characterized as sticks that help the
                > fire be stimulated and then are thrown into the fire
                > to burn up with the rest of the kindling. And...Ah,
                > the warmth, light, sounds, etc are then simply enjoyed.
                >
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