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Jiddu Krishnamurthy on Meditation

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  • medit8ionsociety
    Self-knowledge is the beginning of meditation - not the knowledge that you pick up from my books, from authorities, from gurus, but the knowledge that comes
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 26, 2011
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      Self-knowledge is the beginning of meditation -
      not the knowledge that you pick up from my books,
      from authorities, from gurus, but the knowledge
      that comes into being through self-inquiry, which
      is self-awareness. Meditation is the beginning
      of self-knowledge and without self-knowledge there
      is no meditation. If I don't understand the ways
      of my thoughts, of my feelings, if I don't understand
      my motives, my desires, my demands, my pursuit of
      patterns of action, which are ideas - if I do not
      know myself, there is no foundation for thinking;
      the thinker who merely asks, prays, or excludes,
      without understanding himself, must inevitably
      end in confusion, in illusion.

      The beginning of meditation is self-knowledge,
      which means being aware of every movement of thought
      and feeling, knowing all the layers of my consciousness,
      not only the superficial layers but the hidden, the
      deeply concealed activities. To know the deeply concealed
      activities, the hidden motives, responses, thoughts
      and feelings, there must be tranquillity in the conscious
      mind; that is the conscious mind must be still in order
      to receive the projection of the unconscious.

      The superficial, conscious mind is occupied with its
      daily activities, with earning a livelihood, deceiving
      others, exploiting others, running away from problems -
      all the daily activities of our existence. That
      superficial mind must understand the right significance
      its own activities and thereby bring tranquility to
      itself. It cannot bring about tranquillity, stillness,
      by mere regimentation, by compulsion, by discipline.
      It can bring about tranquility, peace, stillness, only by understanding its own activities, by observing them,
      by being aware of them, by seeing its own ruthlessness,
      how it talks to the servant, to the wife, to the daughter,
      to the mother and so on.

      When the superficial, conscious mind 1s thus fully
      aware of all its activities, through that understanding
      it becomes spontaneously quiet, not drugged by compulsion
      or regimented by desire; then it is in a position to
      receive the intimation, the hints of the unconscious,
      of the many, many hidden layers of the mind - the
      racial instincts, the buried memories, the concealed
      pursuits, the deep wounds that are still unhealed. It
      is only when all these have projected themselves and
      are understood, when the whole consciousness is unburdened, unfettered by any wound, by any memory whatsoever, that
      it is in a position to receive the eternal.

      Meditation is self-knowledge and without self-knowledge
      there is no meditation. If you are not aware of all
      your responses all the time, if you are not fully
      conscious, fully cognizant of your daily activities,
      merely to lock yourself in a room and sit down in front
      of a picture of your guru, of your Master, to meditate,
      is an escape, because without self-knowledge there is
      no right thinking and, without right thinking, what
      you do has no meaning, however noble your intentions are.

      Thus prayer has no significance without self-knowledge
      but when there is self-knowledge there is right thinking
      and hence right action. When there is right action,
      there is no confusion and therefore there is no supplication
      to someone else to lead you out of it. A man who is fully
      aware is meditating; he does not pray, because he does
      not want anything. Through prayer, through regimentation,
      through repetition and all the rest of it, you can bring
      about a certain stillness, but that is mere dullness,
      reducing the mind and the heart to a state of weariness.
      it is drugging the mind; and exclusion, which you call
      concentration, does not lead to reality - no exclusion ever can.

      What brings about understanding is self-knowledge, and
      it is not very difficult to be aware if there is right
      intention. If you are interested to discover the whole
      process of yourself - not merely the superficial part
      but the total process of your whole being - then it is
      comparatively easy. If you really want to know yourself,
      you will search out your heart and your mind to know
      their full content and when there is the intention to
      know, you will know. Then you can follow, without condemnation
      or justification, every movement of thought and feeling;
      by following every thought and every feeling as it arises
      you bring about tranquility which is not compelled,
      not regimented, but which is the outcome of having
      no problem, no contradiction. It is like the pool that
      becomes peaceful, quiet, any evening when there is no
      wind; when the mind is still, then that which is
      immeasurable comes into being.

      Source - J. Krishnamurti The First and Last Freedom
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    • walto
      A couple of bits of this quote struck me. ... [No egg, no chicken; no chicken, no egg.] ... [More on asking/praying below] ... [NB: The conscious mind is
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 27, 2011
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        A couple of bits of this quote struck me.

        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@...> wrote:

        > Meditation is the beginning
        > of self-knowledge and without self-knowledge there
        > is no meditation.

        > The beginning of meditation is self-knowledge,

        > without self-knowledge there is no meditation.


        [No egg, no chicken; no chicken, no egg.]

        > the thinker who merely asks, prays, or excludes,
        > without understanding himself, must inevitably
        > end in confusion, in illusion.
        >

        [More on asking/praying below]

        > The superficial, conscious mind is occupied with its
        > daily activities, with earning a livelihood, deceiving
        > others, exploiting others, running away from problems -
        > all the daily activities of our existence.

        [NB: The conscious mind is always in deception mode: never with helping others or considering the value of meditation, or posting useful material on internet sites, as our moderator does.]

        > of the many, many hidden layers of the mind - the
        > racial instincts, the buried memories, the concealed
        > pursuits, the deep wounds that are still unhealed. It
        > is only when all these have projected themselves and
        > are understood, when the whole consciousness is unburdened, unfettered by any wound, by any memory whatsoever, that
        > it is in a position to receive the eternal.
        >

        [Note to self: must find my "racial instincts" so that they may project themselves.]


        > A man who is fully
        > aware is meditating; he does not pray, because he does
        > not want anything.

        > If you are interested to discover the whole
        > process of yourself - not merely the superficial part
        > but the total process of your whole being - then it is
        > comparatively easy. If you really want to know yourself,
        > you will search out your heart and your mind to know
        > their full content

        [Note to self: don't pray, but really really want.]

        W
      • Shelia Chughtai
        Peace Be Unto You, Very inspiring and uplifting thoughts. It really made me think and reflect... Sr. Shelia ________________________________ From: walto
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 27, 2011
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          Peace Be Unto You,

          Very inspiring and uplifting thoughts. It really made me think and reflect...

          Sr. Shelia


          From: walto <calhorn@...>
          To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 6:00 AM
          Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Jiddu Krishnamurthy on Meditation

           
          A couple of bits of this quote struck me.

          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@...> wrote:

          > Meditation is the beginning
          > of self-knowledge and without self-knowledge there
          > is no meditation.

          > The beginning of meditation is self-knowledge,

          > without self-knowledge there is no meditation.

          [No egg, no chicken; no chicken, no egg.]

          > the thinker who merely asks, prays, or excludes,
          > without understanding himself, must inevitably
          > end in confusion, in illusion.
          >

          [More on asking/praying below]

          > The superficial, conscious mind is occupied with its
          > daily activities, with earning a livelihood, deceiving
          > others, exploiting others, running away from problems -
          > all the daily activities of our existence.

          [NB: The conscious mind is always in deception mode: never with helping others or considering the value of meditation, or posting useful material on internet sites, as our moderator does.]

          > of the many, many hidden layers of the mind - the
          > racial instincts, the buried memories, the concealed
          > pursuits, the deep wounds that are still unhealed. It
          > is only when all these have projected themselves and
          > are understood, when the whole consciousness is unburdened, unfettered by any wound, by any memory whatsoever, that
          > it is in a position to receive the eternal.
          >

          [Note to self: must find my "racial instincts" so that they may project themselves.]

          > A man who is fully
          > aware is meditating; he does not pray, because he does
          > not want anything.

          > If you are interested to discover the whole
          > process of yourself - not merely the superficial part
          > but the total process of your whole being - then it is
          > comparatively easy. If you really want to know yourself,
          > you will search out your heart and your mind to know
          > their full content

          [Note to self: don't pray, but really really want.]

          W



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