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RE: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami Satchidananda

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  • Aideen Mckenna
    Again, thanks. Please keep on helping. From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    Message 1 of 194 , Aug 30, 2011
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      Again, thanks.  Please keep on helping.

       

      From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dan330033
      Sent: August-30-11 8:56 AM
      To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami Satchidananda

       

       

      Hi Aideen -

      You are living the book.

      What you are experiencing is the unfolding of the writing.

      You are reading yourself ...

      Smiles,

      Dan

      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Aideen Mckenna" <aideenmck@...> wrote:
      >
      > J - yes, indeed.
      >
      > If you have a book out there, Dan, I'd like to own it.
      >
      > Aideen
      >
      > I don’t know where that “J” came from – it was a happy face on my screen but after it was sent, it metamorphosed into a “J”. 
      >
      > From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bruce
      > Morgen
      > Sent: August-29-11 4:04 PM
      > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami
      > Satchidananda
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Danji can be relied upon to provide
      > such moments -- imo he's one of the
      > clearest written "voices" we have
      > on these matters and has been for
      > as long as can remember.
      >
      > Can I get a "Jai Guruji?" :-)
      >
      >
      >
      > On 8/29/2011 6:54 PM, Aideen Mckenna wrote:
      >
      > It's this sort of exchange that reminds me why I joined this group. Thank
      > you.
      >
      > Aideen
      >
      >
      >
      > From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dan330033
      > Sent: August-29-11 1:21 PM
      > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami
      > Satchidananda
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com> , "walto"
      > <mailto:calhorn@> <calhorn@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com> , "dan330033"
      > <dan330033@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > To see with no bias involves no effort.
      > > >
      > > > Effort comes from trying to see a certain way, which involves a bias.
      > > >
      > > > To see with no bias is effortless, involves no walls, no prejudice for
      > or against.
      > > >
      > > > It is an open vista, so to speak - nothing constrains it.
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Why wouldn't bias-free seeing require (as one would expect) the immense
      > effort and re-training required to cast off years (maybe decades) of
      > parental and societal instruction?
      >
      > d: because any effort an individual makes is aimed at a result. a desired
      > result is an image held/believed - which is bias.
      >
      > you assume that you are throwing off years of instruction. therefore you are
      > assuming you have an existence of your own which has been falsely
      > conditioned by things that happened in the past.
      >
      > you assume you have a past.
      >
      > you assume you can throw it off.
      >
      > all these assumptions dissolve.
      >
      > effortlessly, because there is no separably existing being to make any
      > effort, nor any outcome for such a being to gain from.
      >
      > > And how would we know when we'd achieved bias-free seeing?
      >
      > d: thinking there is an achievement to be had, is already bias.
      >
      > > Surely the sole fact of not caring one way or another wouldn't be
      > dispositive--(because sometimes that's evidence of different sorts of
      > bias--e.g., one that absolves us from the responsibilities of actions we
      > have taken).
      >
      > d: yes, agreed. not caring a kind of bias - the bias involved in the belief
      > that one exists separately as a being who can care or not care.
      >
      > *being* (being that has no other, no opposite state) is neither caring nor
      > uncaring - because not having a separable position from which to "relate" to
      > things, beings, states of consciousness, and so on.
      >
      > > Thanks.
      >
      > and thank you -
      >
      > - d -
      >

    • medit8ionsociety
      The Final Straw You cannot say exactly what will open your mind and when it will happen. The real knowledge or wisdom will not dawn slowly. Once you get it,
      Message 194 of 194 , Mar 7 7:01 PM
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        The Final Straw

        You cannot say exactly what will open your mind and when it will happen. The real knowledge or wisdom will not dawn slowly. Once you get it, you have it. If you don't get it, you don't have it. The realization doesn't come little by little. Realization is instantaneous. When will it happen? Nobody can tell you. Even a small, trifling thing could do it.


        I will tell you a story about a saint named Patinatar. His father was a very rich man who had made a lot of money from shipping and other businesses. The father had seen many saints and sages and had studied a lot, but nothing had opened his mind to the Truth. He repeated his mantra regularly, performed religious rituals, did all the spiritual practices, but wisdom didn't dawn in him. One day he asked his son, Patinatar, to take his ship and go buy some merchandise. Patinatar went to an island and saw the poor people there. He spent all the money, millions of dollars, on helping these people. Patinatar realized that he couldn't go home with an empty ship, so he filled the entire ship with cow dung cakes, which were probably worth a hundred dollars or less. Then he sailed home.


        As soon as the boat arrived, some of the boatmen ran to the father and told him, "Your son has gone crazy. He spent all of your money, and all he came back with is cow dung." The father was so upset that he didn't even want to see his son. When Patinatar arrived at the house, his father was not even there to greet him.


        Patinatar gave a small package to his mother and said, "Please give this to my father when he comes. I will see you later." With that, he walked out. When the father came home, he asked, "Where is my son?" His wife told him that Patinatar had come and gone, and gave him the package. When the father opened the package, he found a broken sewing needle and a note. The note said, "Even the eye of a broken needle will not come with you on your final journey." As soon as he read those words, he immediately took off his fancy clothes, put on a loin cloth, said goodbye to his house and his businesses, and walked out. Realization had dawned in him. He had heard many hundreds of stories before, he had read volumes, he knew all the philosophy, but nothing had opened his eyes until he saw these few words.


        Realization can dawn with the smallest thing. It doesn't have to be a big blow. That trifling thing is what you call the final straw. Wisdom dawns that way. At any moment, anything could be the last straw for you. Then you are enlightened. Until then, you are still preparing yourself. You are getting ready for that moment.


        Om Shanthi, Shanthi, Shanthi


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