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[Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami Satchidananda

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  • medit8ionsociety
    ... Yo Aideen, I feel at one with what you re saying about Buddhism, but, talking/reading/writing about conundrums; has anyone ever worked harder towards a
    Message 1 of 199 , Jul 6, 2011
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      "Aideen Mckenna" <aideenmck@...> wrote:
      >
      > It's a bit of a mind-hurting conundrum for a person practising a Buddhist
      > philosophy . Awakening is a goal of sorts but the goal thing goes against
      > Buddhism as most understand it. Not clinging, not being attached to the
      > concept of a goal is perhaps how to think about it..
      >
      > Anyway, mette to all in this lovely Meditation Society on this perfectly
      > lovely July day.
      >
      > Aideen
      >
      Yo Aideen,
      I feel at one with what you're saying about Buddhism,
      but, talking/reading/writing about conundrums; has anyone
      ever worked harder towards a goal than Buddha?

      > From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      > medit8ionsociety
      > Sent: July-06-11 12:44 PM
      > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami
      > Satchidananda
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I see, think and feel that Sri Ramana and Sri Satchidananda
      > are both advocating an Advaita- Vedanta teaching that has
      > a goal, which is the experience/realization of the non-dual
      > Self. Ramana points to Self-enquiry in the form of asking
      > "Who am I" as the "navigation tool" to reach the goal.
      > His teachings are 100% in agreement with Swami Satchidananda's
      > statement of "We must always keep the goal
      > clear and see that our every action is recorded,
      > measured, limited and controlled. Every one of us
      > must become navigators." Both are pointing to a goal
      > of freedom from bondage (Jnana), Maharshi using the vehicle
      > of Self-enquiry and Satchidananda with Integral Yoga.
      >
      > Swami Satchidananda actually spent 2 years at the
      > feet of Sri Ramana before getting his permission to
      > leave and seek his goal elsewhere. The goal was reached
      > after finding his Guru, Swami Sivananda. He always showed
      > love and 100% trust in Sri Ramana and his teachings.
      >
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      >
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com> , "Aideen Mckenna"
      > <aideenmck@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I've noticed that, too. Mentally, I delete the "goal" part. My own
      > > practice is based on Buddhist sutras - the Pali canon. No goals there, &
      > > the Buddha was consistent. I found that practising in a goal-free manner
      > > was difficult for a while, because so many of us are conditioned to be
      > > goal-oriented, myself included. Still, I like much of what I read here by
      > > Swami Satchidananda.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of walto
      > > Sent: July-06-11 6:37 AM
      > > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Words of Wisdom by Swami
      > > Satchidananda
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi. I was struck by something in your last couple of posts. This:
      > >
      > > "We must always keep the goal
      > > clear and see that our every action is recorded,
      > > measured, limited and controlled. Every one of us
      > > must become navigators."
      > >
      > > may actually be inconsistent with this:
      > >
      > > "The degree of the absence of thoughts is the
      > > measure of your progress towards Self-realization.
      > > But Self-realization itself does not admit of progress,
      > > it is ever the same."
      > >
      > > One takes the position that mindfulness/eye on the goal/etc. is key to
      > > self-realization. The other that no-mind/absence of goal or direction is
      > the
      > > key.
      > >
      > > Meditation literature is funny that way.
      > >
      > > Best,
      > >
      > > W
      > >
      > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica%40yahoogroups.com> , medit8ionsociety
      > > <no_reply@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Keep the Goal Clear
      > > >
      > > > "From looking at many people's lives, we often see
      > > > that they are almost like rudderless boats. They're
      > > > just tossed here and there. There is no direction
      > > > for them. Even a small wind can toss them here and
      > > > there. And to such people it's very, very difficult
      > > > to say when they will reach their goal, and how.
      > > > In Yoga it's the same. We must always keep the goal
      > > > clear and see that our every action is recorded,
      > > > measured, limited and controlled. Every one of us
      > > > must become navigators. The body is like the boat;
      > > > inside is our common sense, and our intelligence
      > > > is the navigator.
      > > >
      > > > "God bless you. Om Shanti, Shanti, Shanti."
      > > >
      > > > Follow Swami Satchidananda on Twitter at
      > > > twitter.com/SwSatchidananda for daily inspiration.
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • T Koenke Diaz
      This is just so right on. Thank you once again :)
      Message 199 of 199 , May 23
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        This is just so right on.  Thank you once again  :)
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