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RE: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

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  • Aideen Mckenna
    I just finished reading Jill Bolte Taylor s My Stroke of Insight . If you don t know of her, do please click on the link below. At age 37, she had to
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 7, 2010
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      I just finished reading Jill Bolte Taylor’s “My Stroke of Insight”.  If you don’t know of her, do please click on the link below.  At age 37, she had to re-build her personality from square one.  This brilliant PhD had to learn to speak, to walk, to count…everything, EVERYthing from infancy onward.  It took 8 years of very hard work. As the circuitry of her left brain began to come back into running order, she was able to recognize aspects of her pre-stroke personality (certain branches of circuitry) that she wanted to discontinue.  She made conscious decisions, saying “No” (literally) to meanness, pettiness, negativity that had once been hers.  Sean’s phrase “childlike lightness of spirit” kept coming into my mind as I read how she now delights in simple abilities such as “squishing the guts out of semi-frozen peas with my tongue against the roof of my mouth”.  Jill is no simpleton, she lectures on anatomy to medical students at Harvard.  But she found Nirvana in her right brain when the slow-motion stroke knocked out all the programming in her left brain, & she experiences reality differently now.  She’s grateful for the stroke.  Her she is:

       

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyyjU8fzEYU   

       

      Aideen

       

       

       


      From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com [mailto: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of medit8ionsociety
      Sent: February-07-10 5:52 PM
      To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

       

       

      "Papajeff" <jeff@...> wrote:

      >
      > Sean Tremblay used this
      > phrase in a post some
      > time ago, and it keeps
      > coming to mind. For me,
      > it precisely captures one
      > of the real benefits that
      > meditation can yield...
      >
      > And it inspired this post
      > from my meditation group:
      >
      > You will notice as you
      > progress with meditation
      > practice - from practice
      > to the "full-time"
      > meditative life, that
      > a certain lightness of
      > spirit that we enjoyed
      > as children begins to
      > show up more and more
      > often.
      >
      > When we approach life
      > with an inner quiet
      > awareness and meet each
      > "task" as a meditative
      > opportunity, we begin
      > to appreciate the warm
      > water and the soap bubbles
      > when we wash the dishes,
      > the loops we create when
      > we tie our shoes, the
      > sheer joy of a hot shower
      > or a cool rain...
      >
      > with a childlike delight -
      > once we attune to how
      > wonderful it is it be
      > alive and to be a field
      > of joyful sensations.
      >
      > Meditation can and will
      > bring us to that beautiful
      > way of being - the delight
      > of being just who we are,
      > and with grace, the very
      > presence of the divine
      > will roll in and bring
      > peace that passes (rational)
      > understanding and a joy
      > that is too marvelous
      > for words.
      >
      > One Marvelous Love,
      >
      > Jeff
      >
      Yo Papajeff,
      Great Stuff! I just got back from spending
      lots of time with one of my 2 year old granddaughter2
      and her 3 week old little brother. Your words
      about "childlike delight" are right on! Being
      around them had me remember one time when
      Swami Satchidananda was asked "Who was your
      most influential teacher". Well, as he had spent
      several years with Sri Aurobindo, Ramana Maharshi,
      and Swami Sivananda, it was quite a surprise when
      his answer was "Children!" And thinking back, I
      never met an adult that more obviously demonstrated
      what you described as "...how wonderful it is it be
      alive and to be a field of joyful sensations." I hope
      we can all be in such "pure" moments now and ever-after.
      Peace and blessings,
      Bob

    • sean tremblay
      Aideen,funny how things come full circle, I had heard that story before on the radio during a 3 hour drive through a snow storm.  They were discussing the
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 8, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Aideen,
        funny how things come full circle, I had heard that story before on the radio during a 3 hour drive through a snow storm.  They were discussing the nature of personality from mostly a biological point of view, I became so fascinated with the subject and it raised a lot of questions for me, it eventualy led me to the group.
        For that childlike lightness of being, I like to use the Garden of Eden as a metaphor, to represent the human being who is created perfect and brought into exisence in a perfect state The Garden/nonduality the child having nothing to compare anything to takes the world and everything in it as it is without imposing value judjments on it.  Over time we learn collect junk maybe just a little at a time but it builds on our spirit like a plaque.  We "Eat the fruit of the tree" and gain knowlege of good and evil/Duality, at that point life is toil we have to leave that state of being behind, constantly judging good and bad comparing everything against everything else and assigning value to it, but fortunatly there is a way back to the garden but it is not easy, because you have to stop and let go of all those things you have collected on the road of life. Its' scary and sometimes the desire to achieve "IT" whatever "IT" is can lead to self delusion.


        --- On Sun, 2/7/10, Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@...> wrote:

        From: Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@...>
        Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit
        To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, February 7, 2010, 11:24 PM

         

        I just finished reading Jill Bolte Taylor’s “My Stroke of Insight”.  If you don’t know of her, do please click on the link below.  At age 37, she had to re-build her personality from square one.  This brilliant PhD had to learn to speak, to walk, to count…everything, EVERYthing from infancy onward.  It took 8 years of very hard work. As the circuitry of her left brain began to come back into running order, she was able to recognize aspects of her pre-stroke personality (certain branches of circuitry) that she wanted to discontinue.  She made conscious decisions, saying “No” (literally) to meanness, pettiness, negativity that had once been hers.  Sean’s phrase “childlike lightness of spirit” kept coming into my mind as I read how she now delights in simple abilities such as “squishing the guts out of semi-frozen peas with my tongue against the roof of my mouth”.  Jill is no simpleton, she lectures on anatomy to medical students at Harvard.  But she found Nirvana in her right brain when the slow-motion stroke knocked out all the programming in her left brain, & she experiences reality differently now.  She’s grateful for the stroke.  Her she is:

         

        http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=UyyjU8fzEYU   

         

        Aideen

         

         

         


        From: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com [mailto: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com ] On Behalf Of medit8ionsociety
        Sent: February-07- 10 5:52 PM
        To: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com
        Subject: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

         

         

        "Papajeff" <jeff@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sean Tremblay used this
        > phrase in a post some
        > time ago, and it keeps
        > coming to mind. For me,
        > it precisely captures one
        > of the real benefits that
        > meditation can yield...
        >
        > And it inspired this post
        > from my meditation group:
        >
        > You will notice as you
        > progress with meditation
        > practice - from practice
        > to the "full-time"
        > meditative life, that
        > a certain lightness of
        > spirit that we enjoyed
        > as children begins to
        > show up more and more
        > often.
        >
        > When we approach life
        > with an inner quiet
        > awareness and meet each
        > "task" as a meditative
        > opportunity, we begin
        > to appreciate the warm
        > water and the soap bubbles
        > when we wash the dishes,
        > the loops we create when
        > we tie our shoes, the
        > sheer joy of a hot shower
        > or a cool rain...
        >
        > with a childlike delight -
        > once we attune to how
        > wonderful it is it be
        > alive and to be a field
        > of joyful sensations.
        >
        > Meditation can and will
        > bring us to that beautiful
        > way of being - the delight
        > of being just who we are,
        > and with grace, the very
        > presence of the divine
        > will roll in and bring
        > peace that passes (rational)
        > understanding and a joy
        > that is too marvelous
        > for words.
        >
        > One Marvelous Love,
        >
        > Jeff
        >
        Yo Papajeff,
        Great Stuff! I just got back from spending
        lots of time with one of my 2 year old granddaughter2
        and her 3 week old little brother. Your words
        about "childlike delight" are right on! Being
        around them had me remember one time when
        Swami Satchidananda was asked "Who was your
        most influential teacher". Well, as he had spent
        several years with Sri Aurobindo, Ramana Maharshi,
        and Swami Sivananda, it was quite a surprise when
        his answer was "Children!" And thinking back, I
        never met an adult that more obviously demonstrated
        what you described as "...how wonderful it is it be
        alive and to be a field of joyful sensations." I hope
        we can all be in such "pure" moments now and ever-after.
        Peace and blessings,
        Bob


      • Aideen Mckenna
        Hi Sean, In one perfect paragraph, you just summed up everything I ve been mulling over daily for the last few years. Thank you. Joni Mitchell s song about
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 8, 2010
        • 0 Attachment

          Hi Sean,

           

          In one perfect paragraph, you just summed up everything I’ve been mulling over daily for the last few years.  Thank you. 

          Joni Mitchell’s song about Woodstock : “We’ve got to get ourselves back to the Garden”.  Yes, & we mustn’t get attached to that (or any) outcome.  Sail past the angel with the flaming sword at the Garden’s gate, smiling innocently, because we know the gate’s wide open anyway.  We’re just going home, after all, & no angel can stop us as long as we aren’t dragging a shitload of baggage.

          “Just Do It” (Nike).

          Enjoy this perfect day!  A.

           


          From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sean tremblay
          Sent: February-08-10 8:11 AM
          To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

           

           

          Aideen,

          funny how things come full circle, I had heard that story before on the radio during a 3 hour drive through a snow storm.  They were discussing the nature of personality from mostly a biological point of view, I became so fascinated with the subject and it raised a lot of questions for me, it eventualy led me to the group.

          For that childlike lightness of being, I like to use the Garden of Eden as a metaphor, to represent the human being who is created perfect and brought into exisence in a perfect state The Garden/nonduality the child having nothing to compare anything to takes the world and everything in it as it is without imposing value judjments on it.  Over time we learn collect junk maybe just a little at a time but it builds on our spirit like a plaque.  We "Eat the fruit of the tree" and gain knowlege of good and evil/Duality, at that point life is toil we have to leave that state of being behind, constantly judging good and bad comparing everything against everything else and assigning value to it, but fortunatly there is a way back to the garden but it is not easy, because you have to stop and let go of all those things you have collected on the road of life. Its' scary and sometimes the desire to achieve "IT" whatever "IT" is can lead to self delusion.



          --- On Sun, 2/7/10, Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@telus. net> wrote:


          From: Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@telus. net>
          Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit
          To: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com
          Date: Sunday, February 7, 2010, 11:24 PM

           

          I just finished reading Jill Bolte Taylor’s “My Stroke of Insight”.  If you don’t know of her, do please click on the link below.  At age 37, she had to re-build her personality from square one.  This brilliant PhD had to learn to speak, to walk, to count…everything, EVERYthing from infancy onward.  It took 8 years of very hard work. As the circuitry of her left brain began to come back into running order, she was able to recognize aspects of her pre-stroke personality (certain branches of circuitry) that she wanted to discontinue.  She made conscious decisions, saying “No” (literally) to meanness, pettiness, negativity that had once been hers.  Sean’s phrase “childlike lightness of spirit” kept coming into my mind as I read how she now delights in simple abilities such as “squishing the guts out of semi-frozen peas with my tongue against the roof of my mouth”.  Jill is no simpleton, she lectures on anatomy to medical students at Harvard.  But she found Nirvana in her right brain when the slow-motion stroke knocked out all the programming in her left brain, & she experiences reality differently now.  She’s grateful for the stroke.  Her she is:

           

          http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=UyyjU8fzEYU   

           

          Aideen

           

           

           


          From: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com [mailto: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com ] On Behalf Of medit8ionsociety
          Sent: February-07- 10 5:52 PM
          To: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com
          Subject: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

           

           

          "Papajeff" <jeff@...> wrote:

          >
          > Sean Tremblay used this
          > phrase in a post some
          > time ago, and it keeps
          > coming to mind. For me,
          > it precisely captures one
          > of the real benefits that
          > meditation can yield...
          >
          > And it inspired this post
          > from my meditation group:
          >
          > You will notice as you
          > progress with meditation
          > practice - from practice
          > to the "full-time"
          > meditative life, that
          > a certain lightness of
          > spirit that we enjoyed
          > as children begins to
          > show up more and more
          > often.
          >
          > When we approach life
          > with an inner quiet
          > awareness and meet each
          > "task" as a meditative
          > opportunity, we begin
          > to appreciate the warm
          > water and the soap bubbles
          > when we wash the dishes,
          > the loops we create when
          > we tie our shoes, the
          > sheer joy of a hot shower
          > or a cool rain...
          >
          > with a childlike delight -
          > once we attune to how
          > wonderful it is it be
          > alive and to be a field
          > of joyful sensations.
          >
          > Meditation can and will
          > bring us to that beautiful
          > way of being - the delight
          > of being just who we are,
          > and with grace, the very
          > presence of the divine
          > will roll in and bring
          > peace that passes (rational)
          > understanding and a joy
          > that is too marvelous
          > for words.
          >
          > One Marvelous Love,
          >
          > Jeff
          >
          Yo Papajeff,
          Great Stuff! I just got back from spending
          lots of time with one of my 2 year old granddaughter2
          and her 3 week old little brother. Your words
          about "childlike delight" are right on! Being
          around them had me remember one time when
          Swami Satchidananda was asked "Who was your
          most influential teacher". Well, as he had spent
          several years with Sri Aurobindo, Ramana Maharshi,
          and Swami Sivananda, it was quite a surprise when
          his answer was "Children!" And thinking back, I
          never met an adult that more obviously demonstrated
          what you described as "...how wonderful it is it be
          alive and to be a field of joyful sensations." I hope
          we can all be in such "pure" moments now and ever-after.
          Peace and blessings,
          Bob

           

        • sean tremblay
          Thanks Aideen ... From: Aideen Mckenna Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit To:
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 8, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Aideen

            --- On Mon, 2/8/10, Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@...> wrote:

            From: Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@...>
            Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit
            To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, February 8, 2010, 11:52 AM

             

            Hi Sean,

             

            In one perfect paragraph, you just summed up everything I’ve been mulling over daily for the last few years.  Thank you. 

            Joni Mitchell’s song about Woodstock : “We’ve got to get ourselves back to the Garden”.  Yes, & we mustn’t get attached to that (or any) outcome.  Sail past the angel with the flaming sword at the Garden’s gate, smiling innocently, because we know the gate’s wide open anyway.  We’re just going home, after all, & no angel can stop us as long as we aren’t dragging a shitload of baggage.

            “Just Do It” (Nike).

            Enjoy this perfect day!  A.

             


            From: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:meditations ocietyofamerica@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of sean tremblay
            Sent: February-08- 10 8:11 AM
            To: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com
            Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

             

             

            Aideen,

            funny how things come full circle, I had heard that story before on the radio during a 3 hour drive through a snow storm.  They were discussing the nature of personality from mostly a biological point of view, I became so fascinated with the subject and it raised a lot of questions for me, it eventualy led me to the group.

            For that childlike lightness of being, I like to use the Garden of Eden as a metaphor, to represent the human being who is created perfect and brought into exisence in a perfect state The Garden/nonduality the child having nothing to compare anything to takes the world and everything in it as it is without imposing value judjments on it.  Over time we learn collect junk maybe just a little at a time but it builds on our spirit like a plaque.  We "Eat the fruit of the tree" and gain knowlege of good and evil/Duality, at that point life is toil we have to leave that state of being behind, constantly judging good and bad comparing everything against everything else and assigning value to it, but fortunatly there is a way back to the garden but it is not easy, because you have to stop and let go of all those things you have collected on the road of life. Its' scary and sometimes the desire to achieve "IT" whatever "IT" is can lead to self delusion.



            --- On Sun, 2/7/10, Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@telus. net> wrote:


            From: Aideen Mckenna <aideenmck@telus. net>
            Subject: RE: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit
            To: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com
            Date: Sunday, February 7, 2010, 11:24 PM

             

            I just finished reading Jill Bolte Taylor’s “My Stroke of Insight”.  If you don’t know of her, do please click on the link below.  At age 37, she had to re-build her personality from square one.  This brilliant PhD had to learn to speak, to walk, to count…everything, EVERYthing from infancy onward.  It took 8 years of very hard work. As the circuitry of her left brain began to come back into running order, she was able to recognize aspects of her pre-stroke personality (certain branches of circuitry) that she wanted to discontinue.  She made conscious decisions, saying “No” (literally) to meanness, pettiness, negativity that had once been hers.  Sean’s phrase “childlike lightness of spirit” kept coming into my mind as I read how she now delights in simple abilities such as “squishing the guts out of semi-frozen peas with my tongue against the roof of my mouth”.  Jill is no simpleton, she lectures on anatomy to medical students at Harvard.  But she found Nirvana in her right brain when the slow-motion stroke knocked out all the programming in her left brain, & she experiences reality differently now.  She’s grateful for the stroke.  Her she is:

             

            http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=UyyjU8fzEYU   

             

            Aideen

             

             

             


            From: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com [mailto: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com ] On Behalf Of medit8ionsociety
            Sent: February-07- 10 5:52 PM
            To: meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com
            Subject: [Meditation Society of America ] Re: Childlike Lightness of Spirit

             

             

            "Papajeff" <jeff@...> wrote:
            >
            > Sean Tremblay used this
            > phrase in a post some
            > time ago, and it keeps
            > coming to mind. For me,
            > it precisely captures one
            > of the real benefits that
            > meditation can yield...
            >
            > And it inspired this post
            > from my meditation group:
            >
            > You will notice as you
            > progress with meditation
            > practice - from practice
            > to the "full-time"
            > meditative life, that
            > a certain lightness of
            > spirit that we enjoyed
            > as children begins to
            > show up more and more
            > often.
            >
            > When we approach life
            > with an inner quiet
            > awareness and meet each
            > "task" as a meditative
            > opportunity, we begin
            > to appreciate the warm
            > water and the soap bubbles
            > when we wash the dishes,
            > the loops we create when
            > we tie our shoes, the
            > sheer joy of a hot shower
            > or a cool rain...
            >
            > with a childlike delight -
            > once we attune to how
            > wonderful it is it be
            > alive and to be a field
            > of joyful sensations.
            >
            > Meditation can and will
            > bring us to that beautiful
            > way of being - the delight
            > of being just who we are,
            > and with grace, the very
            > presence of the divine
            > will roll in and bring
            > peace that passes (rational)
            > understanding and a joy
            > that is too marvelous
            > for words.
            >
            > One Marvelous Love,
            >
            > Jeff
            >
            Yo Papajeff,
            Great Stuff! I just got back from spending
            lots of time with one of my 2 year old granddaughter2
            and her 3 week old little brother. Your words
            about "childlike delight" are right on! Being
            around them had me remember one time when
            Swami Satchidananda was asked "Who was your
            most influential teacher". Well, as he had spent
            several years with Sri Aurobindo, Ramana Maharshi,
            and Swami Sivananda, it was quite a surprise when
            his answer was "Children!" And thinking back, I
            never met an adult that more obviously demonstrated
            what you described as "...how wonderful it is it be
            alive and to be a field of joyful sensations." I hope
            we can all be in such "pure" moments now and ever-after.
            Peace and blessings,
            Bob

             


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