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MEDITATING ON NON-SELF

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  • medit8ionsociety
    An excerpt from MEDITATING ON NON-SELF: A Dhamma Talk Edited for Bodhi Leaves by Sister Khem There is nothing that is secure. Nothing to hold on to, nothing
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 18, 2009
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      An excerpt from MEDITATING ON NON-SELF:
      A Dhamma Talk Edited for Bodhi Leaves
      by Sister Khem
      There is nothing that is secure. Nothing to
      hold on to, nothing that is stable. The whole
      universe is constantly falling apart and coming
      back together. And that includes the mind and
      the body which we call "I." You may believe it
      or not, it makes no difference. In order to know
      it, you must experience it; when you experience
      it, it's perfectly clear. What one experiences
      is totally clear. No one can say it is not.
      They may try, but their objections make no
      sense because you have experienced it. It's
      the same thing as biting into the mango to know
      its taste.

      To experience it, one needs meditation. An
      ordinary mind can only know ordinary concepts
      and ideas. If one wants to understand and
      experience extraordinary experiences and ideas,
      one has to have an extraordinary mind. An
      extraordinary mind comes about through
      concentration. Most meditators have experienced
      some stage that is different then the one they
      are use to. So it is not ordinary any more.
      But we have to fortify that far more than just
      the beginning stage. To the point where the mind is truly extraordinary. Extraordinary in the sense that
      it can direct itself to where it wants to go.
      Extraordinary in the sense that it no longer
      gets perturbed by everyday events. And
      when the mind can concentrate, then it experiences
      states which it has never known before. To
      realize that your universe constantly falls apart
      and comes back together again is a meditative
      experience. It takes practice, perseverance
      and patience. And when the mind is unperturbed
      and still, equanimity, evenmindedness, peacefulness arise.

      At that time the mind understands the idea of
      impermanence to such an extent that it sees
      itself as totally impermanent. And when one sees
      one's own mind as being totally impermanent,
      there is a shift in one's viewpoint. That shift
      I like to compare with a kaleidoscope that
      children play with. A slight touch and you get
      a different picture. The whole thing looks
      quite different with just a slight shift.
      -------------------------------------------------------------
      Sister Khema was born in Germany, educated in
      Scotland and China, and later became a United
      States citizen. She now lives at Wat Buddha Dhamma
      Forest Monastery near Sydney Australia, which
      was established in 1978 on land purchased and
      donated by her. In 1979 she ordained as a Nun in Sri
      Lanka, and in 1982 she established the International
      Buddhist Women's Centre near Colombo. She spends
      most of her time teaching meditation
      course in different parts of the world.
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