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Re: Practice

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  • dan330033
    Hi Sandeep - Thanks for your post. Good points. For similar reasons, in my opinion, the following statements were attributed to Jesus: Observe the lilies of
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 24, 2009
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      Hi Sandeep -

      Thanks for your post. Good points.

      For similar reasons, in my opinion, the following statements were attributed to Jesus:

      "Observe the lilies of the field, and how they grow."

      "For those who have ears to hear, let them hear."

      "Many are called, few are chosen."

      "Don't throw your pearls before [those who can't appreciate pearls]"


      LOL,

      -- Dan



      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, Sandeep <sandeep1960@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > *"You imposed limits to your true nature of infinite being,
      > then, you get displeased to be only a limited creature,
      > then you begin spiritual practices to transcend these nonexistent
      > limits.
      >
      > "But if your practice itself implies the existence of these limits,
      > how could they allow you to transcend them?"
      > *
      > *~~Ramana Maharshi*
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------
      >
      >
      > /*If Ramana was around today and muttered these lines, he would be
      > accused of the famous Advaitic shuffle
      > and denounced as a neo-Advaitin.
      >
      >
      >
      > How would practice allow a transcending of limits which it itself
      > implies, in the first place.
      >
      > And yet practice(s) teem in phenomenality.
      >
      > Including the practice of self enquiry, as suggested by the same dude.
      >
      >
      >
      > The resolution of this seemingly paradox would be that practice,
      > whatever be it's form and nature, whether Tantric processes, dualistic
      > Bhakti, the various Zen-ic hoopla, Sufi dancing and whirling , the
      > Hassidic rituals , self-enquiry.....the practice of denouncing all
      > practices....
      >
      > ....are all complete in themselves ..... AS themselves.
      >
      >
      > Nothing is a means to anything else even though there appears to be
      > casual linkages between
      > seemingly disparate aspects.
      >
      >
      >
      > If any and every aspect of phenomenality is complete in itself, .....
      >
      > .......then phenomenality as a whole is complete in itself.
      >
      >
      > Moment to moment to moment.
      >
      >
      >
      > This is complete;
      > That is complete;
      > Out of completion, arose completion;
      > And when completion arose;
      > what it arose from, was still complete.
      >
      > */
      >
    • dan330033
      The sense of aloneness is deep, and can be difficult to tolerate. Because awareness has no other, no second, it tends to bring up the sense of aloneness.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 24, 2009
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        The sense of aloneness is deep, and can be difficult to tolerate. Because awareness has no other, no second, it tends to bring up the sense of aloneness. Aloneness = all-one-ness.

        I understand that there is no one existing apart to tolerate or not tolerate awareness (not the word "awareness," the actuality that is nameless, that is nothing/everything).

        The reason I say "difficult to tolerate" is that memory tends to arise, and memory tends to involve "triggered" responses to the sense of being alone, once that sense registers in memory.

        Aloneness, not involving memory response, involves no self, no imagined other, just being.

        Memory response tends to bring up fears of abandonment, feelings of vulnerability or resentment, deprivation, fears of injury, attack, feeling a need to protect, or sensing the possibility of death. This is the human being, it is not a matter of myself vs. others, there is no self or other to this. It is the human being.

        These fears are in memory, quite likely passed on through the DNA.

        They are "early" fears in terms of human development, "basic" fears.

        So, one wants to assuage those fears.

        One generates fantasy, (and often addictions, obsessions, compulsions), and this doesn't just apply to "internal" fantasies (as internal and external are based on imagined division).

        Fantasy includes all kinds of imagery and thought about "others," "the future," "myself," "getting," "having," (as doer, relater, exister, possessor, etc.).

        Fantasy includes many things, and includes generating religious and spiritual saviors, gurus, communities, concepts, practices that will "bring me enlightenment" or "make me a better person."

        "Meditation" is to be, and thus, be aware.

        Awareness is this aloneness.

        Meditation is to be aware of any fantasies, thoughts, fears, etc., that arise (and dissolve), without "entanglement" or "attachment."

        Awareness is not "involved" in any arising, not picking and choosing. All arisings are equal, in terms of awareness.

        Meditation dissolves as one understands that awareness simply is.

        There is no procedure, no attempt, no doing involved.

        To whatever extent "meditation" implies a meditator, or a process, or an outcome, meditation dissolves.

        Awareness is.

        The idea and word "awareness" dissolves.

        -- Dan --
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