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Re: food controversy

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  • truthgold9
    ... Dear sir It is true controlled food and totally controlled sex along with meditation will take to a great height. Olden days rishi , yogis , (vivekananda,
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean tremblay
      <bethjams9@...> wrote:
      >
      > To bad uncontrolled sex is my favorite kind!
      >
      >
      > --- On Wed, 10/15/08, M.V.T. DHANANJEYAN <dhanmvt1@...> wrote:
      >
      > > From: M.V.T. DHANANJEYAN <dhanmvt1@...>
      > > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] food controversy
      > > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 12:14 AM
      > > Dear all
      > >
      > > It is really nice. I enjoyed the veg and non-veg
      > > differences.
      > > All facts are true. Now, coming to my experience in food
      > > reaction
      > > chemistry to our body and soul. Each food have its related
      > > effect in
      > > our body. Non-veg and veg is explained in vedas itself. For
      > >
      > > particular yoga you need to take veg only. At that time if
      > > you take
      > > non-veg we will get adverse or dangerous effect. I can,t
      > > say non-veg
      > > will won,t achieve things in yoga, may be they may get some
      > > unwanted
      > > mental behavior they may not able to correlate to it.
      > >
      > > But, personal view is that for highest level yoga veg is
      > > the best. At
      > > one stage I was advised to take even tasteless food. Highly
      > >
      > > controlled food is really good. I can say no salt, no hard
      > > (chilly),
      > > no bitter, no sweet , no soar advised to me . I stayed like
      > > this
      > > around 2 years. I got beautiful changes in yogic movement.
      > >
      > > The another new area is with food control , I was advised
      > > controlling
      > > sex. This another thing if we do to achieve powerful level
      > > in yoga.
      > > Hinduism is advising both for achieving good level.
      > >
      > > May be the second part will give more question and answer
      > > from our
      > > members.
      > > * just think what type of food I might have taken for 2
      > > years.
      > > Later slowly I become a normal veg character.
      > >
      > > Thank you
      >




      Dear sir
      It is true controlled food and totally controlled sex along
      with meditation will take to a great height. Olden days rishi ,
      yogis , (vivekananda, ramanar , ramakrishnar stayed like this).

      AND ,, It is true now a days no body is interested to have high
      experience.

      A simple variation is total control sex with some medicine is advised
      i.e. not to affect our body is needed at the time of total control.

      In indian medicine ayurveda is given as Mudhanda Kasayam it contains
      18 herbs combination. This will help you to stay without ejaculation
      for a long period of time. yogis use to take for their achievements.

      Thank you
    • sean tremblay
      Has there been any news on the formation of a free yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov. I say a program on the topc and It ws supposed
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
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        Has there been any news on the formation of a free yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov. I say a program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the profiteering of India's cultural inheritence. But I have not found the sight.
        Any body have a bead on that?


        --- On Wed, 10/15/08, truthgold9 <truthgold9@...> wrote:

        > From: truthgold9 <truthgold9@...>
        > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: food controversy
        > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 6:01 AM
        > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean
        > tremblay
        > <bethjams9@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > To bad uncontrolled sex is my favorite kind!
        > >
        > >
        > > --- On Wed, 10/15/08, M.V.T. DHANANJEYAN
        > <dhanmvt1@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > From: M.V.T. DHANANJEYAN <dhanmvt1@...>
        > > > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] food
        > controversy
        > > > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 12:14 AM
        > > > Dear all
        > > >
        > > > It is really nice. I enjoyed the veg and
        > non-veg
        > > > differences.
        > > > All facts are true. Now, coming to my
        > experience in food
        > > > reaction
        > > > chemistry to our body and soul. Each food have
        > its related
        > > > effect in
        > > > our body. Non-veg and veg is explained in vedas
        > itself. For
        > > >
        > > > particular yoga you need to take veg only. At
        > that time if
        > > > you take
        > > > non-veg we will get adverse or dangerous effect.
        > I can,t
        > > > say non-veg
        > > > will won,t achieve things in yoga, may be they
        > may get some
        > > > unwanted
        > > > mental behavior they may not able to correlate to
        > it.
        > > >
        > > > But, personal view is that for highest level yoga
        > veg is
        > > > the best. At
        > > > one stage I was advised to take even tasteless
        > food. Highly
        > > >
        > > > controlled food is really good. I can say no
        > salt, no hard
        > > > (chilly),
        > > > no bitter, no sweet , no soar advised to me . I
        > stayed like
        > > > this
        > > > around 2 years. I got beautiful changes in yogic
        > movement.
        > > >
        > > > The another new area is with food control , I was
        > advised
        > > > controlling
        > > > sex. This another thing if we do to achieve
        > powerful level
        > > > in yoga.
        > > > Hinduism is advising both for achieving good
        > level.
        > > >
        > > > May be the second part will give more question
        > and answer
        > > > from our
        > > > members.
        > > > * just think what type of food I might have taken
        > for 2
        > > > years.
        > > > Later slowly I become a normal veg character.
        > > >
        > > > Thank you
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Dear sir
        > It is true controlled food and totally controlled
        > sex along
        > with meditation will take to a great height. Olden days
        > rishi ,
        > yogis , (vivekananda, ramanar , ramakrishnar stayed like
        > this).
        >
        > AND ,, It is true now a days no body is interested to have
        > high
        > experience.
        >
        > A simple variation is total control sex with some medicine
        > is advised
        > i.e. not to affect our body is needed at the time of total
        > control.
        >
        > In indian medicine ayurveda is given as Mudhanda Kasayam it
        > contains
        > 18 herbs combination. This will help you to stay without
        > ejaculation
        > for a long period of time. yogis use to take for their
        > achievements.
        >
        > Thank you
      • medit8ionsociety
        ... yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov. I say a program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the profiteering of India s cultural
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
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          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean tremblay
          <bethjams9@...> wrote:
          >
          > Has there been any news on the formation of a free
          yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov. I say a
          program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the profiteering of
          India's cultural inheritence. But I have not found the sight.
          > Any body have a bead on that?
          >
          Yo Sean,
          While Googleing about Ayurvedic web sites,
          I found then below copied info. And just when
          I was about to order one of my favorites:
          Chwayn Prash, which i have found
          to be an excellent "wake me up" that has no
          crash at all.
          Oh well!
          'Ayurvedic' Medicines May Contain Lead, Mercury or Arsenic

          August 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five
          ayurvedic medicine products purchased on the
          Internet contain significant levels of lead,
          mercury or arsenic, a new study finds.

          The researchers found that products manufactured
          in the United States were even more likely to
          contain the metals than those made in India, where
          the ayurvedic approach was first developed centuries
          ago. Furthermore, 75 percent of the products containing
          lead, mercury or arsenic advertised that they were
          manufactured using "Good Manufacturing Practices,"
          which is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
          regulation meant to ensure quality.

          "We randomly purchased 193 traditional Indian
          (ayurvedic) medicine products from the Internet.
          About 60 percent were from U.S. companies and 40
          percent from Indian companies. Twenty-one percent
          had significant levels of lead, mercury and arsenic,"
          said the study's lead author, Dr. Robert B. Saper, an
          assistant professor of family medicine at Boston
          University School of Medicine, and director of
          integrative medicine at Boston Medical Center.

          In high levels, these metals can be toxic.

          Results of the study are published in the Aug. 27
          issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

          Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian practice that
          combines the use of numerous modalities, such as
          herbal medicine, massage and special diets, to promote
          wellness and prevent illness, according to the U.S.
          National Center for Complementary and Alternative
          Medicine.

          There are two common practices in ayurveda -- either
          herbal medicine alone, or herbal medicines combined
          with metals and gems, a practice known as rasa shastra.
          In rasa shastra, herbs are combined with metals such
          as lead, mercury, iron and zinc, and gems such as
          pearl. Those that practice this type of ayurveda believe
          it is safe and therapeutic, according to the study.

          Saper said that "many traditional Indian practitioners
          believe quite strongly that if rasa shastra is done
          correctly, it is safe," that he feels these practices
          should be "seriously called into question." Saper also
          said that he doesn't believe anyone should deliberately
          ingest lead, mercury or arsenic.

          The current study included 193 products randomly
          selected and purchased over the Internet. The researchers
          found that 20.7 percent contained metals. The rate in
          U.S. manufactured products was 21.7 percent, and in
          Indian products, it was 19.5 percent.

          Not surprisingly, almost 41 percent of rasa shastra
          products had a greater prevalence of metals, including
          high levels of lead and mercury. "Several Indian-manufactured
          rasa shastra medicines could result in lead and/or
          mercury ingestions 100 to 10,000 times greater than
          acceptable limits," the researchers wrote.

          Seventy-five percent of the products claimed to be
          manufactured under Good Manufacturing Practices.

          Products made by members of the American Herbal
          Products Association (AHPA) were less likely to
          contain metals, according to the study.

          Michael McGuffin, president of the AHPA, said, "It's
          not an accident that AHPA members performed better.
          We've called our members attention to the presence of
          heavy metals in plant materials. Lead is ubiquitous.
          It's in the soil and in the plants. I don't think you
          can get these levels to zero, but it is the manufacturers'
          responsibility to know the amount and to limit it."

          AHPA also recommends that its members don't manufacture
          rasa shastra products.

          Saper said that the FDA hasn't currently set a maximum
          level allowed for lead, mercury and arsenic in dietary
          supplements, but he believes they should.

          McGuffin recommended buying products made by members
          of AHPA, because the study found they were least likely
          to contain metals, and he said consumers should call
          the makers of their medicines and "ask tough questions."
          He said if you call a company and ask what their limits
          are for lead, and the representative says they don't
          know, that's a red flag.


          SOURCES: Robert B. Saper, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor, family
          medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, and director,
          integrative medicine, Boston Medical Center, Mass.; Michael McGuffin,
          president, American Herbal Products Association, Silver Spring, Md.;
          Aug. 27, 2008, Journal of the American Medical Association

          FAIR USE NOTICE
          This site contains copyrighted material the
          use of which has not always been specifically
          authorized by the copyright owner. We are
          making such material available in our efforts
          to advance understanding of environmental,
          political, human rights, economic, democracy,
          scientific, spiritual, and social justice issues,
          etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use'
          of any such copyrighted material as provided
          for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
          In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107,
          the material on this site is distributed
          without profit to those who have expressed a
          prior interest in receiving the included information
          for research and educational purposes. For more
          information go to:
          http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.
          If you wish to use copyrighted material from this
          site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use',
          you must obtain permission from the copyright owner
        • sean tremblay
          I recon I ll stick to beer
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            I recon I'll stick to beer


            --- On Wed, 10/15/08, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            > From: medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: food controversy
            > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 7:20 PM
            > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean
            > tremblay
            > <bethjams9@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Has there been any news on the formation of a free
            > yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov.
            > I say a
            > program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the
            > profiteering of
            > India's cultural inheritence. But I have not found the
            > sight.
            > > Any body have a bead on that?
            > >
            > Yo Sean,
            > While Googleing about Ayurvedic web sites,
            > I found then below copied info. And just when
            > I was about to order one of my favorites:
            > Chwayn Prash, which i have found
            > to be an excellent "wake me up" that has no
            > crash at all.
            > Oh well!
            > 'Ayurvedic' Medicines May Contain Lead, Mercury or
            > Arsenic
            >
            > August 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five
            > ayurvedic medicine products purchased on the
            > Internet contain significant levels of lead,
            > mercury or arsenic, a new study finds.
            >
            > The researchers found that products manufactured
            > in the United States were even more likely to
            > contain the metals than those made in India, where
            > the ayurvedic approach was first developed centuries
            > ago. Furthermore, 75 percent of the products containing
            > lead, mercury or arsenic advertised that they were
            > manufactured using "Good Manufacturing
            > Practices,"
            > which is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
            > regulation meant to ensure quality.
            >
            > "We randomly purchased 193 traditional Indian
            > (ayurvedic) medicine products from the Internet.
            > About 60 percent were from U.S. companies and 40
            > percent from Indian companies. Twenty-one percent
            > had significant levels of lead, mercury and arsenic,"
            > said the study's lead author, Dr. Robert B. Saper, an
            > assistant professor of family medicine at Boston
            > University School of Medicine, and director of
            > integrative medicine at Boston Medical Center.
            >
            > In high levels, these metals can be toxic.
            >
            > Results of the study are published in the Aug. 27
            > issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
            >
            > Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian practice that
            > combines the use of numerous modalities, such as
            > herbal medicine, massage and special diets, to promote
            > wellness and prevent illness, according to the U.S.
            > National Center for Complementary and Alternative
            > Medicine.
            >
            > There are two common practices in ayurveda -- either
            > herbal medicine alone, or herbal medicines combined
            > with metals and gems, a practice known as rasa shastra.
            > In rasa shastra, herbs are combined with metals such
            > as lead, mercury, iron and zinc, and gems such as
            > pearl. Those that practice this type of ayurveda believe
            > it is safe and therapeutic, according to the study.
            >
            > Saper said that "many traditional Indian practitioners
            >
            > believe quite strongly that if rasa shastra is done
            > correctly, it is safe," that he feels these practices
            > should be "seriously called into question." Saper
            > also
            > said that he doesn't believe anyone should deliberately
            >
            > ingest lead, mercury or arsenic.
            >
            > The current study included 193 products randomly
            > selected and purchased over the Internet. The researchers
            > found that 20.7 percent contained metals. The rate in
            > U.S. manufactured products was 21.7 percent, and in
            > Indian products, it was 19.5 percent.
            >
            > Not surprisingly, almost 41 percent of rasa shastra
            > products had a greater prevalence of metals, including
            > high levels of lead and mercury. "Several
            > Indian-manufactured
            > rasa shastra medicines could result in lead and/or
            > mercury ingestions 100 to 10,000 times greater than
            > acceptable limits," the researchers wrote.
            >
            > Seventy-five percent of the products claimed to be
            > manufactured under Good Manufacturing Practices.
            >
            > Products made by members of the American Herbal
            > Products Association (AHPA) were less likely to
            > contain metals, according to the study.
            >
            > Michael McGuffin, president of the AHPA, said,
            > "It's
            > not an accident that AHPA members performed better.
            > We've called our members attention to the presence of
            > heavy metals in plant materials. Lead is ubiquitous.
            > It's in the soil and in the plants. I don't think
            > you
            > can get these levels to zero, but it is the
            > manufacturers'
            > responsibility to know the amount and to limit it."
            >
            > AHPA also recommends that its members don't manufacture
            >
            > rasa shastra products.
            >
            > Saper said that the FDA hasn't currently set a maximum
            > level allowed for lead, mercury and arsenic in dietary
            > supplements, but he believes they should.
            >
            > McGuffin recommended buying products made by members
            > of AHPA, because the study found they were least likely
            > to contain metals, and he said consumers should call
            > the makers of their medicines and "ask tough
            > questions."
            > He said if you call a company and ask what their limits
            > are for lead, and the representative says they don't
            > know, that's a red flag.
            >
            >
            > SOURCES: Robert B. Saper, M.D., M.P.H., assistant
            > professor, family
            > medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, and
            > director,
            > integrative medicine, Boston Medical Center, Mass.; Michael
            > McGuffin,
            > president, American Herbal Products Association, Silver
            > Spring, Md.;
            > Aug. 27, 2008, Journal of the American Medical Association
            >
            > FAIR USE NOTICE
            > This site contains copyrighted material the
            > use of which has not always been specifically
            > authorized by the copyright owner. We are
            > making such material available in our efforts
            > to advance understanding of environmental,
            > political, human rights, economic, democracy,
            > scientific, spiritual, and social justice issues,
            > etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use'
            > of any such copyrighted material as provided
            > for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
            > In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107,
            > the material on this site is distributed
            > without profit to those who have expressed a
            > prior interest in receiving the included information
            > for research and educational purposes. For more
            > information go to:
            > http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.
            > If you wish to use copyrighted material from this
            > site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair
            > use',
            > you must obtain permission from the copyright owner
          • Gwyn Plaine
            Ironically, mercury is in vaccines, as stabilising agent. There s no safe ingestion level for mercury, and injecting it is worse than oral ingestion. THe FDA
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Ironically, mercury is in vaccines, as stabilising agent. There's no
              safe ingestion level for mercury, and injecting it is worse than oral
              ingestion. THe FDA are refusing to look at mercury free, due to cost.
              Amazing how the rules vary by the size of company pushing the
              poison... :)

              On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 12:32 AM, sean tremblay <bethjams9@...> wrote:
              > I recon I'll stick to beer
              >
              > --- On Wed, 10/15/08, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              >
              >> From: medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
              >
              >> Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: food controversy
              >> To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
              >> Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 7:20 PM
              >> --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean
              >> tremblay
              >> <bethjams9@...> wrote:
              >> >
              >> > Has there been any news on the formation of a free
              >> yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov.
              >> I say a
              >> program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the
              >> profiteering of
              >> India's cultural inheritence. But I have not found the
              >> sight.
              >> > Any body have a bead on that?
              >> >
              >> Yo Sean,
              >> While Googleing about Ayurvedic web sites,
              >> I found then below copied info. And just when
              >> I was about to order one of my favorites:
              >> Chwayn Prash, which i have found
              >> to be an excellent "wake me up" that has no
              >> crash at all.
              >> Oh well!
              >> 'Ayurvedic' Medicines May Contain Lead, Mercury or
              >> Arsenic
              >>
              >> August 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five
              >> ayurvedic medicine products purchased on the
              >> Internet contain significant levels of lead,
              >> mercury or arsenic, a new study finds.
              >>
              >> The researchers found that products manufactured
              >> in the United States were even more likely to
              >> contain the metals than those made in India, where
              >> the ayurvedic approach was first developed centuries
              >> ago. Furthermore, 75 percent of the products containing
              >> lead, mercury or arsenic advertised that they were
              >> manufactured using "Good Manufacturing
              >> Practices,"
              >> which is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
              >> regulation meant to ensure quality.
              >>
              >> "We randomly purchased 193 traditional Indian
              >> (ayurvedic) medicine products from the Internet.
              >> About 60 percent were from U.S. companies and 40
              >> percent from Indian companies. Twenty-one percent
              >> had significant levels of lead, mercury and arsenic,"
              >> said the study's lead author, Dr. Robert B. Saper, an
              >> assistant professor of family medicine at Boston
              >> University School of Medicine, and director of
              >> integrative medicine at Boston Medical Center.
              >>
              >> In high levels, these metals can be toxic.
              >>
              >> Results of the study are published in the Aug. 27
              >> issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
              >>
              >> Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian practice that
              >> combines the use of numerous modalities, such as
              >> herbal medicine, massage and special diets, to promote
              >> wellness and prevent illness, according to the U.S.
              >> National Center for Complementary and Alternative
              >> Medicine.
              >>
              >> There are two common practices in ayurveda -- either
              >> herbal medicine alone, or herbal medicines combined
              >> with metals and gems, a practice known as rasa shastra.
              >> In rasa shastra, herbs are combined with metals such
              >> as lead, mercury, iron and zinc, and gems such as
              >> pearl. Those that practice this type of ayurveda believe
              >> it is safe and therapeutic, according to the study.
              >>
              >> Saper said that "many traditional Indian practitioners
              >>
              >> believe quite strongly that if rasa shastra is done
              >> correctly, it is safe," that he feels these practices
              >> should be "seriously called into question." Saper
              >> also
              >> said that he doesn't believe anyone should deliberately
              >>
              >> ingest lead, mercury or arsenic.
              >>
              >> The current study included 193 products randomly
              >> selected and purchased over the Internet. The researchers
              >> found that 20.7 percent contained metals. The rate in
              >> U.S. manufactured products was 21.7 percent, and in
              >> Indian products, it was 19.5 percent.
              >>
              >> Not surprisingly, almost 41 percent of rasa shastra
              >> products had a greater prevalence of metals, including
              >> high levels of lead and mercury. "Several
              >> Indian-manufactured
              >> rasa shastra medicines could result in lead and/or
              >> mercury ingestions 100 to 10,000 times greater than
              >> acceptable limits," the researchers wrote.
              >>
              >> Seventy-five percent of the products claimed to be
              >> manufactured under Good Manufacturing Practices.
              >>
              >> Products made by members of the American Herbal
              >> Products Association (AHPA) were less likely to
              >> contain metals, according to the study.
              >>
              >> Michael McGuffin, president of the AHPA, said,
              >> "It's
              >> not an accident that AHPA members performed better.
              >> We've called our members attention to the presence of
              >> heavy metals in plant materials. Lead is ubiquitous.
              >> It's in the soil and in the plants. I don't think
              >> you
              >> can get these levels to zero, but it is the
              >> manufacturers'
              >> responsibility to know the amount and to limit it."
              >>
              >> AHPA also recommends that its members don't manufacture
              >>
              >> rasa shastra products.
              >>
              >> Saper said that the FDA hasn't currently set a maximum
              >> level allowed for lead, mercury and arsenic in dietary
              >> supplements, but he believes they should.
              >>
              >> McGuffin recommended buying products made by members
              >> of AHPA, because the study found they were least likely
              >> to contain metals, and he said consumers should call
              >> the makers of their medicines and "ask tough
              >> questions."
              >> He said if you call a company and ask what their limits
              >> are for lead, and the representative says they don't
              >> know, that's a red flag.
              >>
              >>
              >> SOURCES: Robert B. Saper, M.D., M.P.H., assistant
              >> professor, family
              >> medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, and
              >> director,
              >> integrative medicine, Boston Medical Center, Mass.; Michael
              >> McGuffin,
              >> president, American Herbal Products Association, Silver
              >> Spring, Md.;
              >> Aug. 27, 2008, Journal of the American Medical Association
              >>
              >> FAIR USE NOTICE
              >> This site contains copyrighted material the
              >> use of which has not always been specifically
              >> authorized by the copyright owner. We are
              >> making such material available in our efforts
              >> to advance understanding of environmental,
              >> political, human rights, economic, democracy,
              >> scientific, spiritual, and social justice issues,
              >> etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use'
              >> of any such copyrighted material as provided
              >> for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
              >> In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107,
              >> the material on this site is distributed
              >> without profit to those who have expressed a
              >> prior interest in receiving the included information
              >> for research and educational purposes. For more
              >> information go to:
              >> http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.
              >> If you wish to use copyrighted material from this
              >> site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair
              >> use',
              >> you must obtain permission from the copyright owner
              >
              >
            • M.V.T. DHANANJEYAN
              ... oral ... cost. ... DEAR SIR IN HINDU CULTURE THE MERCURY IS KNOWN AS SIVANAR VINDHU ( SEMEN OF LORD SIVA). THERE ARE MANY MEDICINE WITH MERCURY. I CAN SAY
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Gwyn Plaine"
                <gplaine@...> wrote:
                >
                > Ironically, mercury is in vaccines, as stabilising agent. There's no
                > safe ingestion level for mercury, and injecting it is worse than
                oral
                > ingestion. THe FDA are refusing to look at mercury free, due to
                cost.
                > Amazing how the rules vary by the size of company pushing the
                > poison... :)
                >
                > On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 12:32 AM, sean tremblay <bethjams9@...>
                wrote:
                > > I recon I'll stick to beer
                > >
                > > --- On Wed, 10/15/08, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                wrote:
                > >
                > >> From: medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                > >
                > >> Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: food controversy
                > >> To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
                > >> Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 7:20 PM
                > >> --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean
                > >> tremblay
                > >> <bethjams9@> wrote:
                > >> >
                > >> > Has there been any news on the formation of a free
                > >> yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov.
                > >> I say a
                > >> program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the
                > >> profiteering of
                > >> India's cultural inheritence. But I have not found the
                > >> sight.
                > >> > Any body have a bead on that?
                > >> >
                > >> Yo Sean,
                > >> While Googleing about Ayurvedic web sites,
                > >> I found then below copied info. And just when
                > >> I was about to order one of my favorites:
                > >> Chwayn Prash, which i have found
                > >> to be an excellent "wake me up" that has no
                > >> crash at all.
                > >> Oh well!
                > >> 'Ayurvedic' Medicines May Contain Lead, Mercury or
                > >> Arsenic
                > >>
                > >> August 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five
                > >> ayurvedic medicine products purchased on the
                > >> Internet contain significant levels of lead,
                > >> mercury or arsenic, a new study finds.
                > >>
                > >> The researchers found that products manufactured
                > >> in the United States were even more likely to
                > >> contain the metals than those made in India, where
                > >> the ayurvedic approach was first developed centuries
                > >> ago. Furthermore, 75 percent of the products containing
                > >> lead, mercury or arsenic advertised that they were
                > >> manufactured using "Good Manufacturing
                > >> Practices,"
                > >> which is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
                > >> regulation meant to ensure quality.
                > >>
                > >> "We randomly purchased 193 traditional Indian
                > >> (ayurvedic) medicine products from the Internet.
                > >> About 60 percent were from U.S. companies and 40
                > >> percent from Indian companies. Twenty-one percent
                > >> had significant levels of lead, mercury and arsenic,"
                > >> said the study's lead author, Dr. Robert B. Saper, an
                > >> assistant professor of family medicine at Boston
                > >> University School of Medicine, and director of
                > >> integrative medicine at Boston Medical Center.
                > >>
                > >> In high levels, these metals can be toxic.
                > >>
                > >> Results of the study are published in the Aug. 27
                > >> issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
                > >>
                > >> Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian practice that
                > >> combines the use of numerous modalities, such as
                > >> herbal medicine, massage and special diets, to promote
                > >> wellness and prevent illness, according to the U.S.
                > >> National Center for Complementary and Alternative
                > >> Medicine.
                > >>
                > >> There are two common practices in ayurveda -- either
                > >> herbal medicine alone, or herbal medicines combined
                > >> with metals and gems, a practice known as rasa shastra.
                > >> In rasa shastra, herbs are combined with metals such
                > >> as lead, mercury, iron and zinc, and gems such as
                > >> pearl. Those that practice this type of ayurveda believe
                > >> it is safe and therapeutic, according to the study.
                > >>
                > >> Saper said that "many traditional Indian practitioners
                > >>
                > >> believe quite strongly that if rasa shastra is done
                > >> correctly, it is safe," that he feels these practices
                > >> should be "seriously called into question." Saper
                > >> also
                > >> said that he doesn't believe anyone should deliberately
                > >>
                > >> ingest lead, mercury or arsenic.
                > >>
                > >> The current study included 193 products randomly
                > >> selected and purchased over the Internet. The researchers
                > >> found that 20.7 percent contained metals. The rate in
                > >> U.S. manufactured products was 21.7 percent, and in
                > >> Indian products, it was 19.5 percent.
                > >>
                > >> Not surprisingly, almost 41 percent of rasa shastra
                > >> products had a greater prevalence of metals, including
                > >> high levels of lead and mercury. "Several
                > >> Indian-manufactured
                > >> rasa shastra medicines could result in lead and/or
                > >> mercury ingestions 100 to 10,000 times greater than
                > >> acceptable limits," the researchers wrote.
                > >>
                > >> Seventy-five percent of the products claimed to be
                > >> manufactured under Good Manufacturing Practices.
                > >>
                > >> Products made by members of the American Herbal
                > >> Products Association (AHPA) were less likely to
                > >> contain metals, according to the study.
                > >>
                > >> Michael McGuffin, president of the AHPA, said,
                > >> "It's
                > >> not an accident that AHPA members performed better.
                > >> We've called our members attention to the presence of
                > >> heavy metals in plant materials. Lead is ubiquitous.
                > >> It's in the soil and in the plants. I don't think
                > >> you
                > >> can get these levels to zero, but it is the
                > >> manufacturers'
                > >> responsibility to know the amount and to limit it."
                > >>
                > >> AHPA also recommends that its members don't manufacture
                > >>
                > >> rasa shastra products.
                > >>
                > >> Saper said that the FDA hasn't currently set a maximum
                > >> level allowed for lead, mercury and arsenic in dietary
                > >> supplements, but he believes they should.
                > >>
                > >> McGuffin recommended buying products made by members
                > >> of AHPA, because the study found they were least likely
                > >> to contain metals, and he said consumers should call
                > >> the makers of their medicines and "ask tough
                > >> questions."
                > >> He said if you call a company and ask what their limits
                > >> are for lead, and the representative says they don't
                > >> know, that's a red flag.
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> SOURCES: Robert B. Saper, M.D., M.P.H., assistant
                > >> professor, family
                > >> medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, and
                > >> director,
                > >> integrative medicine, Boston Medical Center, Mass.; Michael
                > >> McGuffin,
                > >> president, American Herbal Products Association, Silver
                > >> Spring, Md.;
                > >> Aug. 27, 2008, Journal of the American Medical Association
                > >>
                > >> FAIR USE NOTICE
                > >> This site contains copyrighted material the
                > >> use of which has not always been specifically
                > >> authorized by the copyright owner. We are
                > >> making such material available in our efforts
                > >> to advance understanding of environmental,
                > >> political, human rights, economic, democracy,
                > >> scientific, spiritual, and social justice issues,
                > >> etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use'
                > >> of any such copyrighted material as provided
                > >> for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
                > >> In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107,
                > >> the material on this site is distributed
                > >> without profit to those who have expressed a
                > >> prior interest in receiving the included information
                > >> for research and educational purposes. For more
                > >> information go to:
                > >> http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.
                > >> If you wish to use copyrighted material from this
                > >> site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair
                > >> use',
                > >> you must obtain permission from the copyright owner
                > >
                > >
                >


                DEAR SIR

                IN HINDU CULTURE THE MERCURY IS KNOWN AS SIVANAR VINDHU ( SEMEN
                OF LORD SIVA). THERE ARE MANY MEDICINE WITH MERCURY. I CAN SAY
                SIVANAR AMIRDHAM IS ON OF THE METAL MEDICINE-- AYURVEDA PEOPLE USES.
                THERE ARE OTHER MEDICINES LIKE GOLD PASPAM (POWDER), IRON PASPAM ,
                PEARL PASPAM NOTING BUT PROCESSED POWDER OF SEA SHELL. SO OLD
                MEDICINE USES MANY METAL AS MEDICINE. NOW, ONLY WE ARE TALKING ABOUT
                NANO PARTICLE . BUT , OUR ANCESTOR HAD KNOWLEDGE VERY LONG BACK ABOUT
                NANO MEDICINE.

                ACTUALLY IN SCIENCE THERE IS NO TECHNOLOGY EXISTING TO SOLIDIFY
                MERCURY . BUT IN AYURVEDIC TECHNOLOGY SOLDIFICATION IS THEIR FOR
                MERCURY. IN SOME SHOP THEY SELL SOLDIFIED MERCURY IN THE FORM OF SIVA
                LINGA PEOPLE USES FOR PRAYAR (LIKE STATUE).
              • truthgold9
                ... oral ... cost. ... Dear Sir Yogic , vedic , ayurvedic is nothing But Yogic is indicated who is master in meditation . By meditation who achieved many
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 15, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Gwyn Plaine"
                  <gplaine@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Ironically, mercury is in vaccines, as stabilising agent. There's no
                  > safe ingestion level for mercury, and injecting it is worse than
                  oral
                  > ingestion. THe FDA are refusing to look at mercury free, due to
                  cost.
                  > Amazing how the rules vary by the size of company pushing the
                  > poison... :)
                  >
                  > On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 12:32 AM, sean tremblay <bethjams9@...>
                  wrote:
                  > > I recon I'll stick to beer
                  > >
                  > > --- On Wed, 10/15/08, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                  wrote:
                  > >
                  > >> From: medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                  > >
                  > >> Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: food controversy
                  > >> To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
                  > >> Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 7:20 PM
                  > >> --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, sean
                  > >> tremblay
                  > >> <bethjams9@> wrote:
                  > >> >
                  > >> > Has there been any news on the formation of a free
                  > >> yogic/vedic/ayurvedic web site sponered by the Indian Gov.
                  > >> I say a
                  > >> program on the topc and It ws supposed to counter the
                  > >> profiteering of
                  > >> India's cultural inheritence. But I have not found the
                  > >> sight.
                  > >> > Any body have a bead on that?
                  > >> >
                  > >> Yo Sean,
                  > >> While Googleing about Ayurvedic web sites,
                  > >> I found then below copied info. And just when
                  > >> I was about to order one of my favorites:
                  > >> Chwayn Prash, which i have found
                  > >> to be an excellent "wake me up" that has no
                  > >> crash at all.
                  > >> Oh well!
                  > >> 'Ayurvedic' Medicines May Contain Lead, Mercury or
                  > >> Arsenic
                  > >>
                  > >> August 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five
                  > >> ayurvedic medicine products purchased on the
                  > >> Internet contain significant levels of lead,
                  > >> mercury or arsenic, a new study finds.
                  > >>
                  > >> The researchers found that products manufactured
                  > >> in the United States were even more likely to
                  > >> contain the metals than those made in India, where
                  > >> the ayurvedic approach was first developed centuries
                  > >> ago. Furthermore, 75 percent of the products containing
                  > >> lead, mercury or arsenic advertised that they were
                  > >> manufactured using "Good Manufacturing
                  > >> Practices,"
                  > >> which is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
                  > >> regulation meant to ensure quality.
                  > >>
                  > >> "We randomly purchased 193 traditional Indian
                  > >> (ayurvedic) medicine products from the Internet.
                  > >> About 60 percent were from U.S. companies and 40
                  > >> percent from Indian companies. Twenty-one percent
                  > >> had significant levels of lead, mercury and arsenic,"
                  > >> said the study's lead author, Dr. Robert B. Saper, an
                  > >> assistant professor of family medicine at Boston
                  > >> University School of Medicine, and director of
                  > >> integrative medicine at Boston Medical Center.
                  > >>
                  > >> In high levels, these metals can be toxic.
                  > >>
                  > >> Results of the study are published in the Aug. 27
                  > >> issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
                  > >>
                  > >> Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian practice that
                  > >> combines the use of numerous modalities, such as
                  > >> herbal medicine, massage and special diets, to promote
                  > >> wellness and prevent illness, according to the U.S.
                  > >> National Center for Complementary and Alternative
                  > >> Medicine.
                  > >>
                  > >> There are two common practices in ayurveda -- either
                  > >> herbal medicine alone, or herbal medicines combined
                  > >> with metals and gems, a practice known as rasa shastra.
                  > >> In rasa shastra, herbs are combined with metals such
                  > >> as lead, mercury, iron and zinc, and gems such as
                  > >> pearl. Those that practice this type of ayurveda believe
                  > >> it is safe and therapeutic, according to the study.
                  > >>
                  > >> Saper said that "many traditional Indian practitioners
                  > >>
                  > >> believe quite strongly that if rasa shastra is done
                  > >> correctly, it is safe," that he feels these practices
                  > >> should be "seriously called into question." Saper
                  > >> also
                  > >> said that he doesn't believe anyone should deliberately
                  > >>
                  > >> ingest lead, mercury or arsenic.
                  > >>
                  > >> The current study included 193 products randomly
                  > >> selected and purchased over the Internet. The researchers
                  > >> found that 20.7 percent contained metals. The rate in
                  > >> U.S. manufactured products was 21.7 percent, and in
                  > >> Indian products, it was 19.5 percent.
                  > >>
                  > >> Not surprisingly, almost 41 percent of rasa shastra
                  > >> products had a greater prevalence of metals, including
                  > >> high levels of lead and mercury. "Several
                  > >> Indian-manufactured
                  > >> rasa shastra medicines could result in lead and/or
                  > >> mercury ingestions 100 to 10,000 times greater than
                  > >> acceptable limits," the researchers wrote.
                  > >>
                  > >> Seventy-five percent of the products claimed to be
                  > >> manufactured under Good Manufacturing Practices.
                  > >>
                  > >> Products made by members of the American Herbal
                  > >> Products Association (AHPA) were less likely to
                  > >> contain metals, according to the study.
                  > >>
                  > >> Michael McGuffin, president of the AHPA, said,
                  > >> "It's
                  > >> not an accident that AHPA members performed better.
                  > >> We've called our members attention to the presence of
                  > >> heavy metals in plant materials. Lead is ubiquitous.
                  > >> It's in the soil and in the plants. I don't think
                  > >> you
                  > >> can get these levels to zero, but it is the
                  > >> manufacturers'
                  > >> responsibility to know the amount and to limit it."
                  > >>
                  > >> AHPA also recommends that its members don't manufacture
                  > >>
                  > >> rasa shastra products.
                  > >>
                  > >> Saper said that the FDA hasn't currently set a maximum
                  > >> level allowed for lead, mercury and arsenic in dietary
                  > >> supplements, but he believes they should.
                  > >>
                  > >> McGuffin recommended buying products made by members
                  > >> of AHPA, because the study found they were least likely
                  > >> to contain metals, and he said consumers should call
                  > >> the makers of their medicines and "ask tough
                  > >> questions."
                  > >> He said if you call a company and ask what their limits
                  > >> are for lead, and the representative says they don't
                  > >> know, that's a red flag.
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >> SOURCES: Robert B. Saper, M.D., M.P.H., assistant
                  > >> professor, family
                  > >> medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, and
                  > >> director,
                  > >> integrative medicine, Boston Medical Center, Mass.; Michael
                  > >> McGuffin,
                  > >> president, American Herbal Products Association, Silver
                  > >> Spring, Md.;
                  > >> Aug. 27, 2008, Journal of the American Medical Association
                  > >>
                  > >> FAIR USE NOTICE
                  > >> This site contains copyrighted material the
                  > >> use of which has not always been specifically
                  > >> authorized by the copyright owner. We are
                  > >> making such material available in our efforts
                  > >> to advance understanding of environmental,
                  > >> political, human rights, economic, democracy,
                  > >> scientific, spiritual, and social justice issues,
                  > >> etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use'
                  > >> of any such copyrighted material as provided
                  > >> for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
                  > >> In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107,
                  > >> the material on this site is distributed
                  > >> without profit to those who have expressed a
                  > >> prior interest in receiving the included information
                  > >> for research and educational purposes. For more
                  > >> information go to:
                  > >> http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.
                  > >> If you wish to use copyrighted material from this
                  > >> site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair
                  > >> use',
                  > >> you must obtain permission from the copyright owner
                  > >
                  > >
                  >

                  Dear Sir

                  Yogic , vedic , ayurvedic is nothing But

                  Yogic is indicated who is master in meditation . By meditation who
                  achieved many things like knowing about past and future. flying in
                  air, vanishing from one place and appearing in an another place,
                  coming out from your body and going inside these are all a part of
                  achievements . Ultimatum is higher than this.

                  People who achieved higher capability like coming after death (like
                  Jesus) known as yogis

                  vedic -- well defined observed fact written long long back ago with
                  high understaning known as veda . the procedure is known as vedic.
                  It explains all about the universe all things in the universe. But in
                  a hidden form. One should analyse and experience to understand.

                  ayurvedic -- old method , medical science using herbs and metals as
                  medicine. Well available in india , china , japan .
                  I can't say is not available in other place. It may be their in some
                  other name.
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