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Re: Bhagavad Gita 12

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  • westwindwood2003
    I cannot take very much credit. The book I am using gives a word for word translation from the Sanskrit. The word order takes a little getting used to and
    Message 1 of 28 , Jun 7, 2008
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      I cannot take very much credit. The book I am using gives a word for
      word translation from the Sanskrit. The word order takes a little
      getting used to and sometimes the English words that are chosen by the
      author have several definitions and the author sometime uses the more
      obscure definition, so I find I have to use a dictionary some to get
      the real meaning. What I then do is try and relate that word for word
      English translation to my own meditation experience so that I can
      express that translation in a way that is more understandable I hope.
      What I find wonderful about the Gita is here are these words that in
      a condensed kind of way outlines the spiritual experience, like
      lecture notes that a teacher can expand on. Since I meditate myself,
      I feel that I can do the subject some justice, but I sometimes wonder
      if there might be better words than the ones I use.
      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety .

      > Yo Westwindwood,
      > This and the previous Gita posting are,
      > as usual, very great pointings. I like
      > the term Guidance (with the capital G) as
      > we often see "Grace" used similarly, but
      > with the term Guidance we also get the
      > concept that a definitive understanding
      > takes place that transcends the mind's usual
      > "it could be like this, or it could be
      > like that" tendency. This allows the "Thy
      > will be done" reality to take us over (and
      > inner) and we then automatically let events
      > of our life proceed as they may without
      > any inner chattering that commonly brings
      > us negativity (takes our peace away). And
      > of course, we all are "Yogi's" in spite of
      > whatever masks cover this true identity.
      > So these wise teaching apply to all of us.
      > Thanks again for sharing.
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      >
    • suman sk
      Thanks for continued posting on the wisdom of Geeta. I read it everyday and find a wonderful insight into the true learning. It is a science in itself but only
      Message 2 of 28 , Jun 8, 2008
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        Thanks for continued posting on the wisdom of Geeta.

        I read it everyday and find a wonderful insight into the true learning.

        It is a science in itself but only for the beleiver.

        Om and God bless all of us

         

        Surendra K



        --- On Sat, 6/7/08, westwindwood2003 <westwindwood2003@...> wrote:

        From: westwindwood2003 <westwindwood2003@...>
        Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Bhagavad Gita 12
        To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, June 7, 2008, 11:53 PM

        I cannot take very much credit. The book I am using gives a word for
        word translation from the Sanskrit. The word order takes a little
        getting used to and sometimes the English words that are chosen by the
        author have several definitions and the author sometime uses the more
        obscure definition, so I find I have to use a dictionary some to get
        the real meaning. What I then do is try and relate that word for word
        English translation to my own meditation experience so that I can
        express that translation in a way that is more understandable I hope.
        What I find wonderful about the Gita is here are these words that in
        a condensed kind of way outlines the spiritual experience, like
        lecture notes that a teacher can expand on. Since I meditate myself,
        I feel that I can do the subject some justice, but I sometimes wonder
        if there might be better words than the ones I use.
        --- In meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com, medit8ionsociety .

        > Yo Westwindwood,
        > This and the previous Gita posting are,
        > as usual, very great pointings. I like
        > the term Guidance (with the capital G) as
        > we often see "Grace" used similarly, but
        > with the term Guidance we also get the
        > concept that a definitive understanding
        > takes place that transcends the mind's usual
        > "it could be like this, or it could be
        > like that" tendency. This allows the "Thy
        > will be done" reality to take us over (and
        > inner) and we then automatically let events
        > of our life proceed as they may without
        > any inner chattering that commonly brings
        > us negativity (takes our peace away). And
        > of course, we all are "Yogi's" in spite of
        > whatever masks cover this true identity.
        > So these wise teaching apply to all of us.
        > Thanks again for sharing.
        > Peace and blessings,
        > Bob
        >


      • WestWindWood
        54. Arjuna asks a question about the qualities (steady of disposition, consistent in vision) of a sage, (who has merged with the Creator, the nature of that
        Message 3 of 28 , Jun 9, 2008
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          54. Arjuna asks a question about the
          qualities (steady of disposition,
          consistent in vision) of a sage, (who
          has merged with the Creator, the
          nature of that which underlies all
          existence). 

          The sage, merged into the Creator
          beyond the normal conscious state,
          we could say in deep meditation,
          experiences the qualities of the
          Creator.  The sage has, over may
          years of evolution, taken these
          experiences and incorporated in him,
          through proper action and behavior,
          the qualities of the Creator so that
          the sage became Self. 

          This seems like A LOT OF HARD
          WORK! But in reality, it is just a
          giving up of all those qualities of
          personality that are not of the divine
          nature.  It seems an agony at the
          time, but is nothing looking back,
          and why was that I clung to so
          important anyway, but it was.


          55. Sri Bhagavan (Krishna) said:
          All desires of the mind (of ones very
          heart) are cast off, Oh Partha, by
          becoming the Self by working with
          the Self in steady wisdom.

          Contact with the Self in meditation
          brings a steady wisdom, Oh what to
          do about my present situation and
          how am I going to work this out,
          God's will be done, and so it goes
          with an answer coming to me so that
          I become more the Self by practicing
          proper behavior and letting the Self
          emerge in place of the misguided
          personality that I have begun with.



          56. The mind is unshaken in
          adversity, and in pleasure, there is no
          latching onto and wanting to retain. 
          Free from attachment, fear and anger
          is the sage poised in wisdom.

          The wisdom found in meditation
          allows the sage these characteristics. 
          This is just something that happens,
          a symptom, not something that the
          sage tries to grasp and become, it just
          happens because one meditates.


        • aideenmck
          Belated thanks for these posts helping us to understand the Bhagavad Gita, about which I was almost totally ignorant. Recently, I ve been reading Ram Dass s
          Message 4 of 28 , Jun 11, 2008
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            Belated thanks for these posts helping us to understand the Bhagavad
            Gita, about which I was almost totally ignorant. Recently, I've been
            reading Ram Dass's "Paths to God: Living the Bhagavad Gita" - it,
            too, is a revelation. Also reading Rumi's poetry, the Coleman Barks
            translation. And meeting Theravadin monks, listening to their dharma
            talks. Sometimes I feel as if I'm perceiving everything for the
            first time. (Where have I been?)
            Aideen

            --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, WestWindWood
            <westwindwood2003@...> wrote:
            >
            > 54. Arjuna asks a question about the
            > qualities (steady of disposition,
            > consistent in vision) of a sage, (who
            > has merged with the Creator, the
            > nature of that which underlies all
            > existence).
            >
            > The sage, merged into the Creator
            > beyond the normal conscious state,
            > we could say in deep meditation,
            > experiences the qualities of the
            > Creator. The sage has, over may
            > years of evolution, taken these
            > experiences and incorporated in him,
            > through proper action and behavior,
            > the qualities of the Creator so that
            > the sage became Self.
            >
            > This seems like A LOT OF HARD
            > WORK! But in reality, it is just a
            > giving up of all those qualities of
            > personality that are not of the divine
            > nature. It seems an agony at the
            > time, but is nothing looking back,
            > and why was that I clung to so
            > important anyway, but it was.
            >
            >
            > 55. Sri Bhagavan (Krishna) said:
            > All desires of the mind (of ones very
            > heart) are cast off, Oh Partha, by
            > becoming the Self by working with
            > the Self in steady wisdom.
            >
            > Contact with the Self in meditation
            > brings a steady wisdom, Oh what to
            > do about my present situation and
            > how am I going to work this out,
            > God's will be done, and so it goes
            > with an answer coming to me so that
            > I become more the Self by practicing
            > proper behavior and letting the Self
            > emerge in place of the misguided
            > personality that I have begun with.
            >
            >
            >
            > 56. The mind is unshaken in
            > adversity, and in pleasure, there is no
            > latching onto and wanting to retain.
            > Free from attachment, fear and anger
            > is the sage poised in wisdom.
            >
            > The wisdom found in meditation
            > allows the sage these characteristics.
            > This is just something that happens,
            > a symptom, not something that the
            > sage tries to grasp and become, it just
            > happens because one meditates.
            >
          • westwindwood2003
            I do not know Sanskrit and so I know that I am not going to always get a translation correct. If I do make a mistake, I do not feel that I am causing any harm
            Message 5 of 28 , Jun 14, 2008
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              I do not know Sanskrit and so I know
              that I am not going to always get a
              translation correct. If I do make a
              mistake, I do not feel that I am
              causing any harm because I just wind
              up commenting on a different aspect
              of meditation than what the Gita is
              referring to at that point. However,
              if I do get it wrong on a particular
              passage, I would like to hear about it
              if someone knows I am wrong
              because I might miss some facet of
              meditation that I might not touch on
              later that is important.

              57. Life's many experiences evoke
              thoughts and feelings. However,
              rejoicing in the good and hatred of
              the bad is not in the personality of
              the person who dwells, resides, in
              Wisdom.

              Being with that Wisdom, the one on
              the path feels the situation is not
              defined as good or bad, but God's
              will, and so petitions for the
              Knowledge of right behavior to deal
              wisely in the circumstance.

              58. A tortoise withdraws head and
              limbs when disturbed, and a Yogi,
              when confronted with an attractive
              sight or painful scene reflexively
              pulls in to contemplate the situation
              knowing a moment's reflection
              brings Wisdom.

              59. Seeing an object of desire, a
              person remains abstinent upon
              leaving the longing behind. Even a
              hint of the desirable reaction drops
              away from the person who perceives
              the Supreme.
            • westwindwood2003
              60. The wise person strives for perfection; turbulent situations though, the chaos of the day, violently carries away the mind. OK, so don t hesitate to
              Message 6 of 28 , Jun 18, 2008
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                60. The wise person strives for
                perfection; turbulent situations
                though, the chaos of the day,
                violently carries away the mind.

                OK, so don't hesitate to meditate!

                61. The yogi controls the chaos of
                the day, these thoughts restrained
                and joined together. Focus on God
                and the yogi's thoughts are settled.

                The turbulent thoughts of the yogi
                are allowed to surface in meditation,
                and the calming effect of the
                meditation experience affects a
                change in the mind (this just happens
                without any attempt at control). With
                the calming, the focus can them be
                brought to God, who then brings
                wisdom allowing the thoughts to be
                settled.

                62. Objects of the senses, (what
                causes the turbulent thoughts of a
                person) cause strong attachment
                because a person has the propensity
                for that particular object of the
                senses. From this attachment comes
                desire and from desire a kind of
                anger, of that is mine,
                possessiveness.

                Attachment caused by their own
                personality, or perhaps we could say
                from their previous karma gives
                material to work on in meditation.

                63. From anger comes delusion and
                from this delusion comes a forgetting
                of facts (memory of what really
                happened or how things are), and
                this loss of reason with impetuous
                behavior, results in death.

                Why am I thinking of a motorcycle
                going 110 mph on a windy country
                road? Actually, this could be most
                anything and usually results in a visit
                from a police officer, or at best
                recognition of out of control feelings
                that need to be worked on in
                meditation.
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