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Mindfulness Explained Excellently

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  • medit8ionsociety
    We point often to Witnessing your life as it takes place as the Real experience of life. The Inner Witness does this every moment your are alive, but the
    Message 1 of 1 , May 4, 2008
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      We point often to Witnessing your life as it takes
      place as the "Real" experience of life. The Inner
      Witness does this every moment your are alive,
      but the Inner Chatterer disrupts awareness
      and has your mind rehashing your past or
      imagining your future or some other non-reality.
      Mindfulness is the 2500 year old technique to place
      you in the Witness posture. Here is one of the best
      descriptions about it. Enjoy!
      Source: Buddhism. Majjhima Nikaya i.55-63,
      Satipatthana Sutta

      There is this one way, monks, for the purification
      of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow and misery,
      for the destruction of pain and grief,
      for winning the right path, for the attainment of
      Nibb-ana, namely the Four Arousings of Mindfulness.
      What are these four?

      Here a monk lives contemplating the body in the body,
      ardent, clearly conscious and mindful, having overcome,
      in this world, covetousness and dejection; he lives
      contemplating feelings in feelings, ardent, clearly
      conscious and mindful, having overcome, in this world,
      covetousness and dejection; he lives contemplating
      consciousness in consciousness, ardent,
      clearly conscious and mindful, having overcome,
      in this world, covetousness and dejection; he lives
      contemplating mental objects in mental objects, ardent,
      clearly conscious and mindful, having overcome in this
      world, covetousness and dejection.

      And how, monks, does a monk live contemplating body
      in the body? Here a monk, having gone to the forest,
      sits down cross-legged keeping his body erect and setting up
      mindfulness in front of him. Mindful he breathes in,
      mindful he breathes out. Breathing in long, he knows,
      "I breathe in long." Breathing out long, he knows,
      "I breathe out long." Breathing in short,
      he knows, "I breathe in short." Breathing out short,
      he knows, "I breathe out short." "Experiencing the
      whole body I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself....

      And further, a monk knows when he is going,
      "I am going"; he knows when he is standing, "I am standing";
      he knows when he is sitting, "I am
      sitting"; he knows when he is lying down, "I am
      lying down"; or just as the body is disposed so he knows it....

      And further, a monk reflects on this very body
      enveloped by the skin and full of manifold impurity
      from the soles up and from the crown of the
      head down, thinking, "There are in this body: hair
      of the head, hair of the body, nails, teeth, skin,
      flesh, sinews, bones, marrow, kidney, heart,
      liver, membranes, spleen, lungs, bowels, intestines,
      mesentery, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat,
      fat, saliva, mucus, synovic fluid,
      urine."...

      And further, if a monk sees a body dead for one day,
      or two or three, swollen, discolored, decomposing,
      thrown aside in the cemetery, he applies this
      perception to his own body, "Truly, this body of mine,
      too, is of the same nature, it will become like that
      and will not escape it."...

      And how, monks, does a monk live contemplating feelings
      in feelings? Here a monk when experiencing a pleasant
      feeling knows, "I experience a pleasant feeling"; when
      experiencing a painful feeling knows, "I experience a
      painful feeling"; when experiencing a feeling that is
      neither pleasant nor painful knows, "I experience a
      neither pleasant nor painful feeling."...

      And how does a monk live contemplating consciousness
      in consciousness? Here, monks, a monk knows the
      consciousness with craving as with craving; the
      consciousness without craving as without craving; the
      consciousness with anger as with anger; the consciousness
      without anger as without anger; the consciousness with
      ignorance as with ignorance; the consciousness without
      ignorance as without ignorance... the freed state of
      consciousness as the freed state; the unfreed state
      of consciousness as the unfreed....

      And how does a monk live contemplating mental objects
      in mental objects? Here, monks, a monk lives contemplating
      mental objects in the mental objects of the five hindrances.
      When sense desire is present, a monk knows, "There is
      sense desire in me", or when sense desire is not present
      he knows, "There is no sense desire in me." He knows
      how the arising of the non-arisen sense desire comes
      to be; he knows how the abandoning of the arisen
      sense-desire comes to be; he knows how the non-arising
      in the future of the abandoned sense desire comes to be.
      When anger is present, he knows... when sloth and torpor
      is present, he knows... when restlessness and worry are
      present, he knows... when doubt is present, he knows...

      Truly, monks, whoever practices these Four Settings
      up of Mindfulness for seven years, then one of two results
      may be expected by him: highest knowledge here and now or,
      if some remainder of clinging is yet present,
      the state of non-returning.

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