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I Am the Walrus

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  • Aideen McKenna
    I was taking a course in Buddhist philosophy & struggling with the idea of re-birth. It seems to me that in nature, nothing is annihilated. Everything dies
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 18, 2008
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      I was taking a course in Buddhist philosophy & struggling with the idea of re-birth.  It seems to me that in nature, nothing is annihilated.  Everything dies but it is, one way or another, reborn.  So I had no trouble understanding that what I know as “my” body will die, is always dying, & will return to the stuff of which it’s made.  But I did have a problem with the “me” in the container of body.  Where will “I” go, I wondered?  If there is no self, no soul, what is it that’s reborn?  How? 

      At the time, I had a sort of image of myself as a small leaf being carried along in a big river, heading to the sea.  That analogy was of no particular help to me - it was just a thought that recurred – a little leaf being whisked along at times, at other times stuck on a rock or a root, whirled around in an eddy, but eventually being released and continuing toward the sea.  One day, from an entirely unexpected source, I heard the analogy of “self” as a whirlpool in a river.  Not the leaf caught in the whirlpool, but the whirlpool itself.  You can see the thing – it has form, it has structure.  You can get an idea of its great energy by noticing those leaves, sticks, stones, that are caught up in it.  But you know that whirlpool is “just” part of the river.  And as you watch it, it suddenly loses its energy & vanishes.  The bits that it had hold of are released in a microsecond, & the river flows on as it never stopped doing.  The place where the whirlpool used to “exist” is river, as if the whirlpool had never been.  But it’s not “gone” – all the water & all the energy that was the whirlpool are still there as part of the river.  They were never anything else.  

      In the larger picture, the river originated in the sea, so it was never anything else either.

      I don’t think I said any of that very well – words are next to useless at times.  But for what it’s worth, the analogy was, for me, like a light bulb being switched on.  I’m the whirlpool.  (Also the river …and the leaf …etc.)

      Aideen    


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    • Sanjiv Sahay
      Aideen, Thank you. This is a very insightful perspective about life and death. I also believe in reincarnation, and it is amazing how that belief changes
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 19, 2008
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        Aideen,
         
        Thank you. This is a very insightful perspective about life and death.
        I also believe in reincarnation, and it is amazing how that belief changes attitudes towards death. The more you think about it, the more you realize that death is not very significant in the long term as far as the evolution of the Atma (soul) is concerned.
        Regards,
         
        Sanjiv
         
      • sean tremblay
        I read a great anallogy on the subject. The author compared incarnations to a light bulb, the bulb burns out but the flow of electricity is continual even
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 20, 2008
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          I read a great anallogy on the subject.  The author compared incarnations to a light bulb, the bulb burns out but the flow of electricity is continual even though the bulb is replaced.

          Sanjiv Sahay <sanjivs77@...> wrote:
          Aideen,
           
          Thank you. This is a very insightful perspective about life and death.
          I also believe in reincarnation, and it is amazing how that belief changes attitudes towards death. The more you think about it, the more you realize that death is not very significant in the long term as far as the evolution of the Atma (soul) is concerned.
          Regards,
           
          Sanjiv
           


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        • Aideen McKenna
          Oh, yes – that’s helpful – thanks for that. Aideen _____ From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 20, 2008
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            Oh, yes – that’s helpful – thanks for that.

            Aideen

             


            From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com [mailto: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of sean tremblay
            Sent: March 20, 2008 4:09 AM
            To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Meditation Society of America ] Re:I Am the Walrus

             

            I read a great anallogy on the subject.  The author compared incarnations to a light bulb, the bulb burns out but the flow of electricity is continual even though the bulb is replaced.

            Sanjiv Sahay <sanjivs77@gmail. com> wrote:

            Aideen,

             

            Thank you. This is a very insightful perspective about life and death.

            I also believe in reincarnation, and it is amazing how that belief changes attitudes towards death. The more you think about it, the more you realize that death is not very significant in the long term as far as the evolution of the Atma (soul) is concerned.

            Regards,

             

            Sanjiv
             

             

             


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