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Re: [Meditation Society of America] When Creativity Arises The Inner Chatterer Shuts Off

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  • Bruce Morgen
    ...or as a wise old jazzman told me nearly forty years ago, You ll know you re a player when you ve stopped watching yourself try to play!
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 27, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      ...or as a wise old jazzman
      told me nearly forty years ago,
      "You'll know you're a player
      when you've stopped watching
      yourself try to play!"


      medit8ionsociety wrote:
      > In this article from Medical New Today,
      > I think what has been found is what meditators
      > find when they concentrate...IE: that when the
      > "Inner Chatterer" that compares, judges, and
      > comments on virtually everything stops
      > its chatter, creative wisdom and beauty flows.
      > Enjoy (in spite of the scientific jargon)!
      >
      > Main Category: Neurology / Neuroscience
      > Article Date: 27 Feb 2008 - 4:00 PST
      >
      > Large Portion Of Brain's Prefrontal Region
      > 'Takes 5' To Let Creativity Flow In Jazz
      > Improvisation
      >
      > When John Coltrane was expanding the boundaries
      > of the well-known song "My Favorite Things" at
      > the Village Vanguard in May 1966, no one could
      > have known what inspired him to take the musical
      > turns he took. But imaging researchers may now
      > have a better picture of how the brain was helping
      > to carry him there. Scientists funded by the
      > National Institute on Deafness and Other
      > Communication Disorders (NIDCD) have found that,
      > when jazz musicians are engaged in the highly
      > creative and spontaneous activity known as
      > improvisation, a large region of the brain involved
      > in monitoring one's performance is shut down, while
      > a small region involved in organizing self-initiated
      > thoughts and behaviors is highly activated. The
      > researchers propose that this and several related
      > patterns are likely to be key indicators of a brain
      > that is engaged in highly creative thought. NIDCD is
      > one of the National Institutes of Health. The study
      > is published in the Feb. 27 issue of the journal
      > Public Library of Science (PLoS) One.
      >
      > During the study, six highly trained jazz musicians
      > played the keyboard under two scenarios while in the
      > functional MRI scanner. Functional MRI (fMRI) is an
      > imaging tool that measures the amount of blood
      > traveling to various regions of the brain as a means
      > of assessing the amount of neural activity in those
      > areas.
      >
      > "The ability to study how the brain functions when
      > it is thinking creatively has been difficult for
      > scientists because of the many variables involved,"
      > said James F. Battey, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., director
      > of the NIDCD. "Through some creative thinking of
      > their own, these researchers designed a protocol
      > in which jazz musicians could play a keyboard while
      > in the confines of a functional MRI scanner. And in
      > doing so, they were able to pinpoint differences in
      > how the brain functions when the musicians are
      > improvising as opposed to playing a simple melody
      > from memory."
      >
      > The study was conducted by researchers of NIDCD's
      > Division of Intramural Research. Authors on the study
      > are Charles J. Limb, M.D., who was then a research
      > fellow with NIDCD, and Allen R. Braun, M.D., chief
      > of the division's Language Section. Dr. Limb is
      > now an otolaryngologist at the Johns Hopkins University
      > School of Medicine and faculty member at the university's
      > Peabody Conservatory of Music.
      >
      > The first scenario, called the Scale paradigm,
      > was based on a simple C major scale. Using only
      > their right hand, the volunteers first played
      > the scale up and down in quarter notes, an activity
      > they, as accomplished musicians, had performed many
      > times before. Next, they were asked to improvise,
      > though they were limited to playing quarter notes
      > within the C major scale. "Although the musicians
      > were indeed improvising, it was a relatively low-level
      > form of improvisation, musically speaking," said Limb.
      >
      > The second scenario, called the Jazz paradigm,
      > addressed higher level musical improvisation.
      > This paradigm was based on a novel blues melody
      > written by Limb that the volunteers had memorized
      > beforehand. Again, using only their right hand,
      > the musicians would play the tune exactly as they
      > had memorized it, only this time accompanied through
      > headphones by a pre-recorded jazz quartet. When they
      > were asked to improvise, the musicians listened to
      > the same audio background, but they were free to
      > spontaneously play whatever notes they wished.
      >
      > All of this was accomplished while the musicians
      > lay on their backs with their heads and torsos
      > inside an fMRI scanner and their knees bent upward.
      > The plastic keyboard, which was shortened to fit
      > inside the scanner and which had its magnetic parts
      > removed for safety, rested on the musicians' knees.
      > A mirror placed over the volunteers' eyes, together
      > with the headphones, helped the musicians see and
      > hear what they were playing. The resulting fMRI scans
      > recorded the amount of change in neural activity -
      > increases and decreases - between the improvised
      > and memorized versions.
      >
      > Turning Off 'The Monitor'
      >
      > One notable finding was that the brain scans were
      > nearly identical for the low-level and high-level
      > forms of improvisation, thus supporting the
      > researchers' hypothesis that the change in neural
      > activity was due to creativity and not the complexity
      > of the task. If the latter were the case, there would
      > have been a more noticeable difference between the
      > Scale and Jazz paradigms, since the Jazz paradigm was
      > significantly more complex.
      >
      > Moreover, the researchers found that much of
      > the change between improvisation and memorization
      > occurred in the prefrontal cortex, the region of
      > the frontal lobe of the brain that helps us think
      > and problem-solve and that provides a sense of self.
      > Interestingly, the large portion responsible for
      > monitoring one's performance (dorsolateral prefrontal
      > cortex) shuts down completely during improvisation,
      > while the much smaller, centrally located region at
      > the foremost part of the brain (medial prefrontal
      > cortex) increases in activity. The medial prefrontal
      > cortex is involved in self-initiated thoughts and
      > behaviors, and is very active when a person describes
      > an event that has happened to him or makes up a story.
      > The researchers explain that, just as over-thinking
      > a jump shot can cause a basketball player to fall out
      > of the zone and perform poorly, the suppression of
      > inhibitory, self-monitoring brain mechanisms helps
      > to promote the free flow of novel ideas and impulses.
      > While this brain pattern is unusual, it resembles the
      > pattern seen in people when they are dreaming.
      >
      > Another unusual finding was that there was increased
      > neural activity in each of the sensory areas
      > during improvisation, including those responsible
      > for touch, hearing and vision, despite the fact that
      > there were no significant differences in what
      > individuals were hearing, touching and seeing during
      > both memorized and improvised conditions. "It's
      > almost as if the brain ramps up its sensorimotor
      > processing in order to be in a creative state," said
      > Limb. The systems that regulate emotion were also
      > engaged during improvisation.
      >
      > "One important thing we can conclude from this study
      > is that there is no single creative area of the brain -
      > no focal activation of a single area," said Braun.
      > "Rather, when you move from either of the control
      > tasks to improvisation, you see a strong and
      > consistent pattern of activity throughout the brain
      > that enables creativity."
      >
      > ----------------------------
      > Article adapted by Medical News Today from
      > original press release.
      > ----------------------------
      >
      > NIDCD supports and conducts research and research
      > training on the normal and disordered processes
      > of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech a
      > nd language and provides health information, based
      > upon scientific discovery, to the public. For more
      > information about NIDCD programs, see the Web site at
      > http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/.
      >
      > The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -
      > The Nation's Medical Research Agency - includes
      > 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of
      > the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services.
      > It is the primary federal agency for conducting
      > and supporting basic, clinical, and translational
      > medical research, and it investigates the causes,
      > treatments, and cures for both common and rare
      > diseases. For more information about NIH and its
      > programs, visit http://www.nih.gov/.
      >
      > Source: Jennifer Wenger
      > IH/National Institute on Deafness and Other
      > Communication Disorders
      >
      >
    • Jeff Belyea
      ...or as Yogi Berra said, You can t think and hit the ball at the same time.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 28, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        ...or as Yogi Berra said,
        "You can't think and hit
        the ball at the same time."

        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Morgen
        <editor@...> wrote:
        >
        > ...or as a wise old jazzman
        > told me nearly forty years ago,
        > "You'll know you're a player
        > when you've stopped watching
        > yourself try to play!"
        >
        >
        > medit8ionsociety wrote:
        > > In this article from Medical New Today,
        > > I think what has been found is what meditators
        > > find when they concentrate...IE: that when the
        > > "Inner Chatterer" that compares, judges, and
        > > comments on virtually everything stops
        > > its chatter, creative wisdom and beauty flows.
        > > Enjoy (in spite of the scientific jargon)!
        > >
        > > Main Category: Neurology / Neuroscience
        > > Article Date: 27 Feb 2008 - 4:00 PST
        > >
        > > Large Portion Of Brain's Prefrontal Region
        > > 'Takes 5' To Let Creativity Flow In Jazz
        > > Improvisation
        > >
        > > When John Coltrane was expanding the boundaries
        > > of the well-known song "My Favorite Things" at
        > > the Village Vanguard in May 1966, no one could
        > > have known what inspired him to take the musical
        > > turns he took. But imaging researchers may now
        > > have a better picture of how the brain was helping
        > > to carry him there. Scientists funded by the
        > > National Institute on Deafness and Other
        > > Communication Disorders (NIDCD) have found that,
        > > when jazz musicians are engaged in the highly
        > > creative and spontaneous activity known as
        > > improvisation, a large region of the brain involved
        > > in monitoring one's performance is shut down, while
        > > a small region involved in organizing self-initiated
        > > thoughts and behaviors is highly activated. The
        > > researchers propose that this and several related
        > > patterns are likely to be key indicators of a brain
        > > that is engaged in highly creative thought. NIDCD is
        > > one of the National Institutes of Health. The study
        > > is published in the Feb. 27 issue of the journal
        > > Public Library of Science (PLoS) One.
        > >
        > > During the study, six highly trained jazz musicians
        > > played the keyboard under two scenarios while in the
        > > functional MRI scanner. Functional MRI (fMRI) is an
        > > imaging tool that measures the amount of blood
        > > traveling to various regions of the brain as a means
        > > of assessing the amount of neural activity in those
        > > areas.
        > >
        > > "The ability to study how the brain functions when
        > > it is thinking creatively has been difficult for
        > > scientists because of the many variables involved,"
        > > said James F. Battey, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., director
        > > of the NIDCD. "Through some creative thinking of
        > > their own, these researchers designed a protocol
        > > in which jazz musicians could play a keyboard while
        > > in the confines of a functional MRI scanner. And in
        > > doing so, they were able to pinpoint differences in
        > > how the brain functions when the musicians are
        > > improvising as opposed to playing a simple melody
        > > from memory."
        > >
        > > The study was conducted by researchers of NIDCD's
        > > Division of Intramural Research. Authors on the study
        > > are Charles J. Limb, M.D., who was then a research
        > > fellow with NIDCD, and Allen R. Braun, M.D., chief
        > > of the division's Language Section. Dr. Limb is
        > > now an otolaryngologist at the Johns Hopkins University
        > > School of Medicine and faculty member at the university's
        > > Peabody Conservatory of Music.
        > >
        > > The first scenario, called the Scale paradigm,
        > > was based on a simple C major scale. Using only
        > > their right hand, the volunteers first played
        > > the scale up and down in quarter notes, an activity
        > > they, as accomplished musicians, had performed many
        > > times before. Next, they were asked to improvise,
        > > though they were limited to playing quarter notes
        > > within the C major scale. "Although the musicians
        > > were indeed improvising, it was a relatively low-level
        > > form of improvisation, musically speaking," said Limb.
        > >
        > > The second scenario, called the Jazz paradigm,
        > > addressed higher level musical improvisation.
        > > This paradigm was based on a novel blues melody
        > > written by Limb that the volunteers had memorized
        > > beforehand. Again, using only their right hand,
        > > the musicians would play the tune exactly as they
        > > had memorized it, only this time accompanied through
        > > headphones by a pre-recorded jazz quartet. When they
        > > were asked to improvise, the musicians listened to
        > > the same audio background, but they were free to
        > > spontaneously play whatever notes they wished.
        > >
        > > All of this was accomplished while the musicians
        > > lay on their backs with their heads and torsos
        > > inside an fMRI scanner and their knees bent upward.
        > > The plastic keyboard, which was shortened to fit
        > > inside the scanner and which had its magnetic parts
        > > removed for safety, rested on the musicians' knees.
        > > A mirror placed over the volunteers' eyes, together
        > > with the headphones, helped the musicians see and
        > > hear what they were playing. The resulting fMRI scans
        > > recorded the amount of change in neural activity -
        > > increases and decreases - between the improvised
        > > and memorized versions.
        > >
        > > Turning Off 'The Monitor'
        > >
        > > One notable finding was that the brain scans were
        > > nearly identical for the low-level and high-level
        > > forms of improvisation, thus supporting the
        > > researchers' hypothesis that the change in neural
        > > activity was due to creativity and not the complexity
        > > of the task. If the latter were the case, there would
        > > have been a more noticeable difference between the
        > > Scale and Jazz paradigms, since the Jazz paradigm was
        > > significantly more complex.
        > >
        > > Moreover, the researchers found that much of
        > > the change between improvisation and memorization
        > > occurred in the prefrontal cortex, the region of
        > > the frontal lobe of the brain that helps us think
        > > and problem-solve and that provides a sense of self.
        > > Interestingly, the large portion responsible for
        > > monitoring one's performance (dorsolateral prefrontal
        > > cortex) shuts down completely during improvisation,
        > > while the much smaller, centrally located region at
        > > the foremost part of the brain (medial prefrontal
        > > cortex) increases in activity. The medial prefrontal
        > > cortex is involved in self-initiated thoughts and
        > > behaviors, and is very active when a person describes
        > > an event that has happened to him or makes up a story.
        > > The researchers explain that, just as over-thinking
        > > a jump shot can cause a basketball player to fall out
        > > of the zone and perform poorly, the suppression of
        > > inhibitory, self-monitoring brain mechanisms helps
        > > to promote the free flow of novel ideas and impulses.
        > > While this brain pattern is unusual, it resembles the
        > > pattern seen in people when they are dreaming.
        > >
        > > Another unusual finding was that there was increased
        > > neural activity in each of the sensory areas
        > > during improvisation, including those responsible
        > > for touch, hearing and vision, despite the fact that
        > > there were no significant differences in what
        > > individuals were hearing, touching and seeing during
        > > both memorized and improvised conditions. "It's
        > > almost as if the brain ramps up its sensorimotor
        > > processing in order to be in a creative state," said
        > > Limb. The systems that regulate emotion were also
        > > engaged during improvisation.
        > >
        > > "One important thing we can conclude from this study
        > > is that there is no single creative area of the brain -
        > > no focal activation of a single area," said Braun.
        > > "Rather, when you move from either of the control
        > > tasks to improvisation, you see a strong and
        > > consistent pattern of activity throughout the brain
        > > that enables creativity."
        > >
        > > ----------------------------
        > > Article adapted by Medical News Today from
        > > original press release.
        > > ----------------------------
        > >
        > > NIDCD supports and conducts research and research
        > > training on the normal and disordered processes
        > > of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech a
        > > nd language and provides health information, based
        > > upon scientific discovery, to the public. For more
        > > information about NIDCD programs, see the Web site at
        > > http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/.
        > >
        > > The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -
        > > The Nation's Medical Research Agency - includes
        > > 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of
        > > the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services.
        > > It is the primary federal agency for conducting
        > > and supporting basic, clinical, and translational
        > > medical research, and it investigates the causes,
        > > treatments, and cures for both common and rare
        > > diseases. For more information about NIH and its
        > > programs, visit http://www.nih.gov/.
        > >
        > > Source: Jennifer Wenger
        > > IH/National Institute on Deafness and Other
        > > Communication Disorders
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Balasubramanian Radhakrishnan Kumar
        Since the ball, the act of hitting and the hitter are all one and the same ! To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.comFrom: jeff@mindgoal.comDate: Thu, 28
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 28, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Since the ball, the act of hitting and the hitter are all one and the same !


          To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
          From: jeff@...
          Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2008 11:25:05 +0000
          Subject: Re: [Meditation Society of America] When Creativity Arises The Inner Chatterer Shuts Off

          ...or as Yogi Berra said,
          "You can't think and hit
          the ball at the same time."

          --- In meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com, Bruce Morgen
          <editor@...> wrote:
          >
          > ...or as a wise old jazzman
          > told me nearly forty years ago,
          > "You'll know you're a player
          > when you've stopped watching
          > yourself try to play!"
          >
          >
          > medit8ionsociety wrote:
          > > In this article from Medical New Today,
          > > I think what has been found is what meditators
          > > find when they concentrate. ..IE: that when the
          > > "Inner Chatterer" that compares, judges, and
          > > comments on virtually everything stops
          > > its chatter, creative wisdom and beauty flows.
          > > Enjoy (in spite of the scientific jargon)!
          > >
          > > Main Category: Neurology / Neuroscience
          > > Article Date: 27 Feb 2008 - 4:00 PST
          > >
          > > Large Portion Of Brain's Prefrontal Region
          > > 'Takes 5' To Let Creativity Flow In Jazz
          > > Improvisation
          > >
          > > When John Coltrane was expanding the boundaries
          > > of the well-known song "My Favorite Things" at
          > > the Village Vanguard in May 1966, no one could
          > > have known what inspired him to take the musical
          > > turns he took. But imaging researchers may now
          > > have a better picture of how the brain was helping
          > > to carry him there. Scientists funded by the
          > > National Institute on Deafness and Other
          > > Communication Disorders (NIDCD) have found that,
          > > when jazz musicians are engaged in the highly
          > > creative and spontaneous activity known as
          > > improvisation, a large region of the brain involved
          > > in monitoring one's performance is shut down, while
          > > a small region involved in organizing self-initiated
          > > thoughts and behaviors is highly activated. The
          > > researchers propose that this and several related
          > > patterns are likely to be key indicators of a brain
          > > that is engaged in highly creative thought. NIDCD is
          > > one of the National Institutes of Health. The study
          > > is published in the Feb. 27 issue of the journal
          > > Public Library of Science (PLoS) One.
          > >
          > > During the study, six highly trained jazz musicians
          > > played the keyboard under two scenarios while in the
          > > functional MRI scanner. Functional MRI (fMRI) is an
          > > imaging tool that measures the amount of blood
          > > traveling to various regions of the brain as a means
          > > of assessing the amount of neural activity in those
          > > areas.
          > >
          > > "The ability to study how the brain functions when
          > > it is thinking creatively has been difficult for
          > > scientists because of the many variables involved,"
          > > said James F. Battey, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., director
          > > of the NIDCD. "Through some creative thinking of
          > > their own, these researchers designed a protocol
          > > in which jazz musicians could play a keyboard while
          > > in the confines of a functional MRI scanner. And in
          > > doing so, they were able to pinpoint differences in
          > > how the brain functions when the musicians are
          > > improvising as opposed to playing a simple melody
          > > from memory."
          > >
          > > The study was conducted by researchers of NIDCD's
          > > Division of Intramural Research. Authors on the study
          > > are Charles J. Limb, M.D., who was then a research
          > > fellow with NIDCD, and Allen R. Braun, M.D., chief
          > > of the division's Language Section. Dr. Limb is
          > > now an otolaryngologist at the Johns Hopkins University
          > > School of Medicine and faculty member at the university's
          > > Peabody Conservatory of Music.
          > >
          > > The first scenario, called the Scale paradigm,
          > > was based on a simple C major scale. Using only
          > > their right hand, the volunteers first played
          > > the scale up and down in quarter notes, an activity
          > > they, as accomplished musicians, had performed many
          > > times before. Next, they were asked to improvise,
          > > though they were limited to playing quarter notes
          > > within the C major scale. "Although the musicians
          > > were indeed improvising, it was a relatively low-level
          > > form of improvisation, musically speaking," said Limb.
          > >
          > > The second scenario, called the Jazz paradigm,
          > > addressed higher level musical improvisation.
          > > This paradigm was based on a novel blues melody
          > > written by Limb that the volunteers had memorized
          > > beforehand. Again, using only their right hand,
          > > the musicians would play the tune exactly as they
          > > had memorized it, only this time accompanied through
          > > headphones by a pre-recorded jazz quartet. When they
          > > were asked to improvise, the musicians listened to
          > > the same audio background, but they were free to
          > > spontaneously play whatever notes they wished.
          > >
          > > All of this was accomplished while the musicians
          > > lay on their backs with their heads and torsos
          > > inside an fMRI scanner and their knees bent upward.
          > > The plastic keyboard, which was shortened to fit
          > > inside the scanner and which had its magnetic parts
          > > removed for safety, rested on the musicians' knees.
          > > A mirror placed over the volunteers' eyes, together
          > > with the headphones, helped the musicians see and
          > > hear what they were playing. The resulting fMRI scans
          > > recorded the amount of change in neural activity -
          > > increases and decreases - between the improvised
          > > and memorized versions.
          > >
          > > Turning Off 'The Monitor'
          > >
          > > One notable finding was that the brain scans were
          > > nearly identical for the low-level and high-level
          > > forms of improvisation, thus supporting the
          > > researchers' hypothesis that the change in neural
          > > activity was due to creativity and not the complexity
          > > of the task. If the latter were the case, there would
          > > have been a more noticeable difference between the
          > > Scale and Jazz paradigms, since the Jazz paradigm was
          > > significantly more complex.
          > >
          > > Moreover, the researchers found that much of
          > > the change between improvisation and memorization
          > > occurred in the prefrontal cortex, the region of
          > > the frontal lobe of the brain that helps us think
          > > and problem-solve and that provides a sense of self.
          > > Interestingly, the large portion responsible for
          > > monitoring one's performance (dorsolateral prefrontal
          > > cortex) shuts down completely during improvisation,
          > > while the much smaller, centrally located region at
          > > the foremost part of the brain (medial prefrontal
          > > cortex) increases in activity. The medial prefrontal
          > > cortex is involved in self-initiated thoughts and
          > > behaviors, and is very active when a person describes
          > > an event that has happened to him or makes up a story.
          > > The researchers explain that, just as over-thinking
          > > a jump shot can cause a basketball player to fall out
          > > of the zone and perform poorly, the suppression of
          > > inhibitory, self-monitoring brain mechanisms helps
          > > to promote the free flow of novel ideas and impulses.
          > > While this brain pattern is unusual, it resembles the
          > > pattern seen in people when they are dreaming.
          > >
          > > Another unusual finding was that there was increased
          > > neural activity in each of the sensory areas
          > > during improvisation, including those responsible
          > > for touch, hearing and vision, despite the fact that
          > > there were no significant differences in what
          > > individuals were hearing, touching and seeing during
          > > both memorized and improvised conditions. "It's
          > > almost as if the brain ramps up its sensorimotor
          > > processing in order to be in a creative state," said
          > > Limb. The systems that regulate emotion were also
          > > engaged during improvisation.
          > >
          > > "One important thing we can conclude from this study
          > > is that there is no single creative area of the brain -
          > > no focal activation of a single area," said Braun.
          > > "Rather, when you move from either of the control
          > > tasks to improvisation, you see a strong and
          > > consistent pattern of activity throughout the brain
          > > that enables creativity."
          > >
          > > ------------ --------- -------
          > > Article adapted by Medical News Today from
          > > original press release.
          > > ------------ --------- -------
          > >
          > > NIDCD supports and conducts research and research
          > > training on the normal and disordered processes
          > > of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech a
          > > nd language and provides health information, based
          > > upon scientific discovery, to the public. For more
          > > information about NIDCD programs, see the Web site at
          > > http://www.nidcd. nih.gov/.
          > >
          > > The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -
          > > The Nation's Medical Research Agency - includes
          > > 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of
          > > the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services.
          > > It is the primary federal agency for conducting
          > > and supporting basic, clinical, and translational
          > > medical research, and it investigates the causes,
          > > treatments, and cures for both common and rare
          > > diseases. For more information about NIH and its
          > > programs, visit http://www.nih. gov/.
          > >
          > > Source: Jennifer Wenger
          > > IH/National Institute on Deafness and Other
          > > Communication Disorders
          > >
          > >
          >




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