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Sioux Vision Quest

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  • medit8ionsociety
    J and Westwind s sharing of their meditative in-sights brought to mind this Native American inner transcendent experience. Enjoy! Before I could go on my
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 13 4:03 PM
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      J and Westwind's sharing of their meditative
      in-sights brought to mind this Native American
      inner transcendent experience.
      Enjoy!

      Before I could go on my vision quest, I had
      to purify myself in the oinikaga tipi, the inipi,
      the sweat lodge.... With the buffalo-horn
      ladle, Good Lance poured ice-cold water over the
      red-glowing stones. There was a tremendous hiss as
      we were instantly enveloped in a cloud of
      searing white steam. It was so hot, it came like a
      shock wave upon me...
      I dared not breathe; I thought that if I did I
      would burn my lungs into charcoal. But I did not
      cry out. I just stuck my head between my knees.
      Good Lance prayed. He used ancient words, "This steam
      is the holy breath of the universe. Hokshila, boy,
      you are in your mother's womb again. You
      are going to be reborn." They all sang two songs,
      very ancient songs, going way back to the days when
      we Sioux roamed the prairie. Suddenly I
      felt wise with the wisdom of generations. These men,
      my relatives, sang loud and vigorously.... The little
      hut was shaken as if in the grip of a
      giant hand. It was trembling as a leaf trembles
      in the wind. Beneath us the earth seemed to move.
      "Grandfather is here," said Good Lance. "The
      spirits are here; the Eagle's wisdom is here."
      We believed it; we knew it. The pipe was passed....
      Four times we smoked. After the last time,
      Good Lance told me, "Hokshila, you have been purified;
      you are no longer a child; you are ready now and
      made strong to go up there and cry for a dream."...

      Our vision pit was an L-shaped hole dug into
      the ground, first straight down and then a short
      horizontal passage deep under the roots of
      the trees. You sit at the end of that passage and
      do your fasting. A grown-up man fasts anywhere from
      one to four days... in my case, it was
      decided that I should stay up there alone without
      food or water for two days and two nights.

      [After some preparations] it was time for me to
      strip and go down into the hole. My father and uncle
      wrapped me in a star quilt and tied me up
      in it with a deer hide thong.... They patted me on
      the back, mumbled some encouragements, and left me there.

      The first hours were the hardest. It was pitch
      dark and deathly still. I sat there without moving.
      My arms and legs went asleep. I could neither hear nor
      see nor feel. I became almost disembodied, a thing
      with a heart and wild thoughts but no flesh or bones.
      Would I ever be able to see and hear again?... I don't
      know how long I sat there. All sense of time had
      left me long ago. I didn't know whether it was day or
      night, had not even a way to find out. I prayed
      and prayed, tears streaming down my cheeks. I wanted
      water but kept praying. Toward evening of
      the second day--and this time is only a wild guess--
      I saw wheels before my eyes forming up into one fiery
      hoop and then separating again into bright,
      many-colored circles, dancing before my eyes and
      gain contracting into one big circle, a circle with
      a mouth and two eyes.

      Suddenly, I heard a voice. It seemed to come
      from within the bundle that was me, a voice from
      the dark. It was hard to tell exactly where it
      came from. It was not a human voice; it sounded
      ike a bird speaking like a man. My hackles rose...
      "Remember the hoop" said the voice, "this night
      we will teach you." And I heard many feet walking
      around in my small vision pit. Suddenly I was out
      of my hole, in another world, standing in
      front of a sweat bath on a prairie covered with
      wildflowers, covered with herds of elk and buffalo.

      I saw a man coming toward me; he seemed to
      have no feet; he just floated toward me out of a mist,
      holding two rattles in his hand. He said, "Boy,
      whatever you tell your people, do not exaggerate;
      always do what your vision tells you. Never pretend."
      The man was wearing an old-fashioned buckskin outfit
      decorated with quillwork. I stretched out my
      hands to touch him, when suddenly I was back inside
      my star quilt, clutching my medicine bundle of
      stones and tobacco ties. I still heard the
      voice, "Remember the hoop; remember the pipe;
      be its spokesman." I was no longer afraid; whoever
      was talking to me meant no harm.

      Suddenly before me stretched a coal-black
      cloud with lightning coming out of it. The cloud
      spread and spread; it grew wings; it became an
      eagle. The eagle talked to me: "I give you a power,
      not to use for yourself, but for your people. It does
      not belong to you; it belongs to the common folks."
      I saw a rider on a gray horse coming toward me, he held in
      his one hand a hoop made of sage. He held it high...
      and again everything dissolved into blackness. Again
      out of the mist came a strange creature
      floating up, covered with hair, pale, formless.
      He wanted to take my medicine away from me, but I
      wrestled with him, defended it. He did not get
      my medicine. He, too, disappeared.

      Suddenly somebody shook me by the shoulder.
      "Wake up, boy." My father and my uncle had come for me.
      The two days and two nights were over.

      Native American Religions. Leonard Crow Dog, Sioux
      Vision Quest
    • J
      ... interesting, certainly beyond anything I ve experienced..thanks for it !
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 13 10:52 PM
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        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
        <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > J and Westwind's sharing of their meditative
        > in-sights brought to mind this Native American
        > inner transcendent experience.
        > Enjoy!
        >
        > Before I could go on my vision quest, I had
        > to purify myself in the oinikaga tipi, the inipi,
        > the sweat lodge.... With the buffalo-horn
        > ladle, Good Lance poured ice-cold water over the
        > red-glowing stones. There was a tremendous hiss as
        > we were instantly enveloped in a cloud of
        > searing white steam. It was so hot, it came like a
        > shock wave upon me...
        > I dared not breathe; I thought that if I did I
        > would burn my lungs into charcoal. But I did not
        > cry out. I just stuck my head between my knees.
        > Good Lance prayed. He used ancient words, "This steam
        > is the holy breath of the universe. Hokshila, boy,
        > you are in your mother's womb again. You
        > are going to be reborn." They all sang two songs,
        > very ancient songs, going way back to the days when
        > we Sioux roamed the prairie. Suddenly I
        > felt wise with the wisdom of generations. These men,
        > my relatives, sang loud and vigorously.... The little
        > hut was shaken as if in the grip of a
        > giant hand. It was trembling as a leaf trembles
        > in the wind. Beneath us the earth seemed to move.
        > "Grandfather is here," said Good Lance. "The
        > spirits are here; the Eagle's wisdom is here."
        > We believed it; we knew it. The pipe was passed....
        > Four times we smoked. After the last time,
        > Good Lance told me, "Hokshila, you have been purified;
        > you are no longer a child; you are ready now and
        > made strong to go up there and cry for a dream."...
        >
        > Our vision pit was an L-shaped hole dug into
        > the ground, first straight down and then a short
        > horizontal passage deep under the roots of
        > the trees. You sit at the end of that passage and
        > do your fasting. A grown-up man fasts anywhere from
        > one to four days... in my case, it was
        > decided that I should stay up there alone without
        > food or water for two days and two nights.
        >
        > [After some preparations] it was time for me to
        > strip and go down into the hole. My father and uncle
        > wrapped me in a star quilt and tied me up
        > in it with a deer hide thong.... They patted me on
        > the back, mumbled some encouragements, and left me there.
        >
        > The first hours were the hardest. It was pitch
        > dark and deathly still. I sat there without moving.
        > My arms and legs went asleep. I could neither hear nor
        > see nor feel. I became almost disembodied, a thing
        > with a heart and wild thoughts but no flesh or bones.
        > Would I ever be able to see and hear again?... I don't
        > know how long I sat there. All sense of time had
        > left me long ago. I didn't know whether it was day or
        > night, had not even a way to find out. I prayed
        > and prayed, tears streaming down my cheeks. I wanted
        > water but kept praying. Toward evening of
        > the second day--and this time is only a wild guess--
        > I saw wheels before my eyes forming up into one fiery
        > hoop and then separating again into bright,
        > many-colored circles, dancing before my eyes and
        > gain contracting into one big circle, a circle with
        > a mouth and two eyes.
        >
        > Suddenly, I heard a voice. It seemed to come
        > from within the bundle that was me, a voice from
        > the dark. It was hard to tell exactly where it
        > came from. It was not a human voice; it sounded
        > ike a bird speaking like a man. My hackles rose...
        > "Remember the hoop" said the voice, "this night
        > we will teach you." And I heard many feet walking
        > around in my small vision pit. Suddenly I was out
        > of my hole, in another world, standing in
        > front of a sweat bath on a prairie covered with
        > wildflowers, covered with herds of elk and buffalo.
        >
        > I saw a man coming toward me; he seemed to
        > have no feet; he just floated toward me out of a mist,
        > holding two rattles in his hand. He said, "Boy,
        > whatever you tell your people, do not exaggerate;
        > always do what your vision tells you. Never pretend."
        > The man was wearing an old-fashioned buckskin outfit
        > decorated with quillwork. I stretched out my
        > hands to touch him, when suddenly I was back inside
        > my star quilt, clutching my medicine bundle of
        > stones and tobacco ties. I still heard the
        > voice, "Remember the hoop; remember the pipe;
        > be its spokesman." I was no longer afraid; whoever
        > was talking to me meant no harm.
        >
        > Suddenly before me stretched a coal-black
        > cloud with lightning coming out of it. The cloud
        > spread and spread; it grew wings; it became an
        > eagle. The eagle talked to me: "I give you a power,
        > not to use for yourself, but for your people. It does
        > not belong to you; it belongs to the common folks."
        > I saw a rider on a gray horse coming toward me, he held in
        > his one hand a hoop made of sage. He held it high...
        > and again everything dissolved into blackness. Again
        > out of the mist came a strange creature
        > floating up, covered with hair, pale, formless.
        > He wanted to take my medicine away from me, but I
        > wrestled with him, defended it. He did not get
        > my medicine. He, too, disappeared.
        >
        > Suddenly somebody shook me by the shoulder.
        > "Wake up, boy." My father and my uncle had come for me.
        > The two days and two nights were over.
        >
        > Native American Religions. Leonard Crow Dog, Sioux
        > Vision Quest
        >


        interesting, certainly beyond anything I've experienced..thanks for it !
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