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Practicing Zen Meditation In Psychotherapists

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  • medit8ionsociety
    Fro the MedicalNewsToday site: Practicing Zen Meditation In Psychotherapists. Controlled Study Suggest It Matters An investigation by German researchers headed
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 20, 2007
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      Fro the MedicalNewsToday site:

      Practicing Zen Meditation In Psychotherapists.
      Controlled Study Suggest It Matters
      An investigation by German researchers headed
      by Professor Nickel which was published in
      the current issue of Psychotherapy and
      Psychosomatics indicates the practicing Zen
      meditation by psychotherapists matters. All
      therapists direct their attention in some manner
      during psychotherapy. A special form of
      directing attention, 'mindfulness', is
      recommended. This study aimed to examine
      whether, and to what extent, promoting
      mindfulness in psychotherapists in training
      (PiT) influences the treatment results of their patients.

      The therapeutic course and treatment results
      of 124 inpatients, who were treated for 9
      weeks by 18 PiTs, were compared. The PiTs
      were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups:
      (i) those practicing Zen meditation (MED; n = 9
      or (ii) control group, which did not perform
      meditation (noMED; n = 9). The results of
      treatment (according to the intent-to-treat
      principle) were examined using the Session
      Questionnaire for General and Differen-tial
      Individual Psychotherapy (STEP), the Questionnaire
      of Changes in Experience and Behavior (VEV)
      and the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R).Compared
      to the noMED group (n = 61), the patients of
      PiTs from the MED group (n = 63) had significantly
      higher evaluations (according to the intent-to-treat
      principle) for individual therapy on 2 STEP scales,
      clarification and problem-solving perspectives.
      Their evaluations were also significantly higher
      for the entire therapeutic result on the VEV.
      Furthermore, the MED group showed greater symptom
      reduction than the noMED group on the Global
      Severity Index and 8 SCL-90-R scales, including
      Somatization, Insecurity in Social Contact,
      Obsessiveness, Anxiety, Anger/Hostility, Phobic
      Anxiety, Paranoid Thinking and Psychoticism.
      This study indicates that promoting mindfulness
      in PiTs could positively influence the therapeutic
      course and treatment results in their patients.
    • jogeshwarmahanta
      Absent minded ness/forgetfulness causes accidents causing damage of wealth of billions dollars/rupees, life, limbs and so on. Learning mindfulness certainly is
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 6, 2008
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        Absent minded ness/forgetfulness causes accidents causing damage of
        wealth of billions dollars/rupees, life, limbs and so on.

        Learning mindfulness certainly is to help prevent the losses.
        regards


        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
        <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Fro the MedicalNewsToday site:
        >
        > Practicing Zen Meditation In Psychotherapists.
        > Controlled Study Suggest It Matters
        > An investigation by German researchers headed
        > by Professor Nickel which was published in
        > the current issue of Psychotherapy and
        > Psychosomatics indicates the practicing Zen
        > meditation by psychotherapists matters. All
        > therapists direct their attention in some manner
        > during psychotherapy. A special form of
        > directing attention, 'mindfulness', is
        > recommended. This study aimed to examine
        > whether, and to what extent, promoting
        > mindfulness in psychotherapists in training
        > (PiT) influences the treatment results of their patients.
        >
        > The therapeutic course and treatment results
        > of 124 inpatients, who were treated for 9
        > weeks by 18 PiTs, were compared. The PiTs
        > were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups:
        > (i) those practicing Zen meditation (MED; n = 9
        > or (ii) control group, which did not perform
        > meditation (noMED; n = 9). The results of
        > treatment (according to the intent-to-treat
        > principle) were examined using the Session
        > Questionnaire for General and Differen-tial
        > Individual Psychotherapy (STEP), the Questionnaire
        > of Changes in Experience and Behavior (VEV)
        > and the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R).Compared
        > to the noMED group (n = 61), the patients of
        > PiTs from the MED group (n = 63) had significantly
        > higher evaluations (according to the intent-to-treat
        > principle) for individual therapy on 2 STEP scales,
        > clarification and problem-solving perspectives.
        > Their evaluations were also significantly higher
        > for the entire therapeutic result on the VEV.
        > Furthermore, the MED group showed greater symptom
        > reduction than the noMED group on the Global
        > Severity Index and 8 SCL-90-R scales, including
        > Somatization, Insecurity in Social Contact,
        > Obsessiveness, Anxiety, Anger/Hostility, Phobic
        > Anxiety, Paranoid Thinking and Psychoticism.
        > This study indicates that promoting mindfulness
        > in PiTs could positively influence the therapeutic
        > course and treatment results in their patients.
        >
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