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Pesky thoughts

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  • texasbg2000 <Bigbobgraham@aol.com>
    Hi Bob and everybody: I do not post here often but I try to keep up with the posts. It is a very interesting and worthwhile message board. I have noticed
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 29, 2002
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      Hi Bob and everybody:

      I do not post here often but I try to keep up with the posts. It is
      a very interesting and worthwhile message board. I have noticed some
      messages about mind chatter and thoughts and the mind. The following
      may shed some light on the wonderful phenomenon of thought.

      Patanjali wrote in such insightful and thorough fashion about the
      entire system of how the mind works that it is worthwhile to see what
      his writings say about this issue.

      P. writes about thoughts in categories. He refers to them as
      fluctuations or disturbances of the consciousness called vrittis.
      Sleep is one. The other four categories of thought are found in Book
      I.6-11. They are: misconception, valid cognition, fantasy, and
      memory. When they are restricted the Seer abides in its essence.
      (I.3)

      Before listing the fluctuations he says:
      I.5 These fluctuations are fivefold; afflicted or non-afflicted.

      The afflictions are named in Book II.3: Ignorance, I-am-ness,
      aversion, attachment, and the will to live, are the causes of
      affliction.

      Thoughts may not be afflicted or stem from ignorance. They may
      arise from a mind that is without the causes of affliction. This is
      why attachment to ideas is warned against. It is not the idea but
      the attitude about the idea that is distracting. Attachment,
      aversion, etc indicate the ego is involved. However, recognition of
      that fact when it happens is not an affliction, but simply valid
      cognition. Taking credit for it is.

      It can be a little confusing because the word attachment is used for
      any of the afflictions in the broad sense ( attachment to aversion,
      or to I-am-ness).

      Patanjali put these ideas first in Yoga Sutra. He must have felt it
      important to start out an understanding of the mind with an
      understanding of them. What you understand is easier to control IMO.

      Love
      Bobby G.
    • medit8ionsociety
      Hi Bobby G, Good to hear/read from you, and thanks for sharing these pointings to reality. I ve felt for a long time that Patanjali said it all, and that all
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 29, 2002
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        Hi Bobby G,
        Good to hear/read from you, and thanks for sharing these pointings to
        reality. I've felt for a long time that Patanjali said it all, and
        that all the books about meditation that have followed for the past
        many centuries have only been rehashing his presentation. The Yoga
        Sutras of Patanjali form the basis for all of Raja Yoga, and merge
        well with Jhana Yoga as well. I've always favored Swami
        Satchidananda's translation and commentary best, with Swami
        Prabhavananda's close thereafter, but when I see such great stuff as
        >"It is not the idea but the attitude about the idea that is
        distracting. Attachment, aversion, etc indicate the ego is involved.
        However, recognition of that fact when it happens is not an
        affliction, but simply valid cognition. Taking credit for it is.", I
        think I'm going to have to include Sri Bobby G's commentary in that
        special realm of divine in-sight.
        Thanks!
        Bob
        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "texasbg2000
        <Bigbobgraham@a...>" <Bigbobgraham@a...> wrote:
        > Hi Bob and everybody:
        >
        > I do not post here often but I try to keep up with the posts. It
        is
        > a very interesting and worthwhile message board. I have noticed
        some
        > messages about mind chatter and thoughts and the mind. The
        following
        > may shed some light on the wonderful phenomenon of thought.
        >
        > Patanjali wrote in such insightful and thorough fashion about the
        > entire system of how the mind works that it is worthwhile to see
        what
        > his writings say about this issue.
        >
        > P. writes about thoughts in categories. He refers to them as
        > fluctuations or disturbances of the consciousness called vrittis.
        > Sleep is one. The other four categories of thought are found in
        Book
        > I.6-11. They are: misconception, valid cognition, fantasy, and
        > memory. When they are restricted the Seer abides in its essence.
        > (I.3)
        >
        > Before listing the fluctuations he says:
        > I.5 These fluctuations are fivefold; afflicted or non-afflicted.
        >
        > The afflictions are named in Book II.3: Ignorance, I-am-ness,
        > aversion, attachment, and the will to live, are the causes of
        > affliction.
        >
        > Thoughts may not be afflicted or stem from ignorance. They may
        > arise from a mind that is without the causes of affliction. This
        is
        > why attachment to ideas is warned against. It is not the idea but
        > the attitude about the idea that is distracting. Attachment,
        > aversion, etc indicate the ego is involved. However, recognition
        of
        > that fact when it happens is not an affliction, but simply valid
        > cognition. Taking credit for it is.
        >
        > It can be a little confusing because the word attachment is used
        for
        > any of the afflictions in the broad sense ( attachment to aversion,
        > or to I-am-ness).
        >
        > Patanjali put these ideas first in Yoga Sutra. He must have felt
        it
        > important to start out an understanding of the mind with an
        > understanding of them. What you understand is easier to control
        IMO.
        >
        > Love
        > Bobby G.
      • texasbg2000 <Bigbobgraham@aol.com>
        Hi Bob: So many people have mentioned the Satchitanada translation I will have to pick it up when I see it. I have Iyengar s which is great because of all his
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 30, 2002
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          Hi Bob:

          So many people have mentioned the Satchitanada translation I will
          have to pick it up when I see it. I have Iyengar's which is great
          because of all his personal word of mouth knowledge (did you know
          Patanjali was the greatest dancer of ancient India?), Vivekananda's,
          D'Andrade's, Alice Bailey's and a couple of others.

          It starts to make sense after a while.

          Love
          Bobby G.

          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > Hi Bobby G,
          > Good to hear/read from you, and thanks for sharing these pointings
          to
          > reality. I've felt for a long time that Patanjali said it all, and
          > that all the books about meditation that have followed for the past
          > many centuries have only been rehashing his presentation. The Yoga
          > Sutras of Patanjali form the basis for all of Raja Yoga, and merge
          > well with Jhana Yoga as well. I've always favored Swami
          > Satchidananda's translation and commentary best, with Swami
          > Prabhavananda's close thereafter, but when I see such great stuff
          as
          > >"It is not the idea but the attitude about the idea that is
          > distracting. Attachment, aversion, etc indicate the ego is
          involved.
          > However, recognition of that fact when it happens is not an
          > affliction, but simply valid cognition. Taking credit for it is.",
          I
          > think I'm going to have to include Sri Bobby G's commentary in that
          > special realm of divine in-sight.
          > Thanks!
          > Bob
          > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "texasbg2000
          > <Bigbobgraham@a...>" <Bigbobgraham@a...> wrote:
          > > Hi Bob and everybody:
          > >
          > > I do not post here often but I try to keep up with the posts. It
          > is
          > > a very interesting and worthwhile message board. I have noticed
          > some
          > > messages about mind chatter and thoughts and the mind. The
          > following
          > > may shed some light on the wonderful phenomenon of thought.
          > >
          > > Patanjali wrote in such insightful and thorough fashion about the
          > > entire system of how the mind works that it is worthwhile to see
          > what
          > > his writings say about this issue.
          > >
          > > P. writes about thoughts in categories. He refers to them as
          > > fluctuations or disturbances of the consciousness called
          vrittis.
          > > Sleep is one. The other four categories of thought are found in
          > Book
          > > I.6-11. They are: misconception, valid cognition, fantasy, and
          > > memory. When they are restricted the Seer abides in its essence.
          > > (I.3)
          > >
          > > Before listing the fluctuations he says:
          > > I.5 These fluctuations are fivefold; afflicted or non-afflicted.
          > >
          > > The afflictions are named in Book II.3: Ignorance, I-am-ness,
          > > aversion, attachment, and the will to live, are the causes of
          > > affliction.
          > >
          > > Thoughts may not be afflicted or stem from ignorance. They may
          > > arise from a mind that is without the causes of affliction. This
          > is
          > > why attachment to ideas is warned against. It is not the idea
          but
          > > the attitude about the idea that is distracting. Attachment,
          > > aversion, etc indicate the ego is involved. However, recognition
          > of
          > > that fact when it happens is not an affliction, but simply valid
          > > cognition. Taking credit for it is.
          > >
          > > It can be a little confusing because the word attachment is used
          > for
          > > any of the afflictions in the broad sense ( attachment to
          aversion,
          > > or to I-am-ness).
          > >
          > > Patanjali put these ideas first in Yoga Sutra. He must have felt
          > it
          > > important to start out an understanding of the mind with an
          > > understanding of them. What you understand is easier to control
          > IMO.
          > >
          > > Love
          > > Bobby G.
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