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Meditation in the class

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  • john whitten
    I am interested in using meditation to improve focus, behaviour, and performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the meditation techniques I
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 23, 2006
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      I am interested in using meditation to improve focus, behaviour, and performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find the the position, breathing pattern, physical relaxing technique, and emptying of mental and emotional reactivity methods that are referrred to to prepare for several of the techniques? Please help. Thanks, John whitten


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    • medit8ionsociety
      ... performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find the the position, breathing
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 23, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, john whitten
        <whittenjohn@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am interested in using meditation to improve focus, behaviour, and
        performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the
        meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find the the
        position, breathing pattern, physical relaxing technique, and
        emptying of mental and emotional reactivity methods that are
        referrred to to prepare for several of the techniques? Please help.
        Thanks, John whitten
        >
        Yo John,
        What a small universe this is. We taught dozens of our
        classes in an 8th grade classroom for the Haverford
        Adult Education Program. I think the average 8th grade
        classroom is a very challanging environment to teach
        meditation in, but also one of the most needed fro sharing
        this ancient knowledge. The vibes of decades of boredom,
        fear of flunking, general teen angst, etc, are heavy in
        the air, but thus so is the need to present an antedote.
        Anyway, we would start each class by having the students
        get as comfortable as they could in whatever position
        they preferred, close their eyes, and then guide them in
        tensing and then relaxing their body, part by part, from
        their toes to their scalp. BTW, There is a 17 or so minute
        version of this on our Guided Meditation CD. I'll be glad
        to send you a copy if you email me a mailing address, but
        you'll have to wait until I return from Arkansas where I'll
        be visiting my son and daughter-in-law for the next 9 days.
        In class, we usually did a 5 minute or so version of this.
        This also extrapolated into their learning just where they
        keep their tension, and then in "real life" be able to do
        spot checks throughout the day and just by focusing on their
        tension areas, be able to have all their tension release.
        For instance, if you usually keep tension in they shoulders,
        just by relaxing them, eventually your body (and emotions
        and mind) will relaxe simultaneously.
        OK - back to the class...After they are relaxed, and this
        simple technique will do it well, guide them in commanding
        their bodies to not fidgit, itch, ache, or in any way
        distract them from focusing on their meditation. Similarly,
        guide them in directing their emotions to not get too
        blissed out, too upset, or in any way bringing your focus
        away from the meditation. And then help them command their
        mind to not chatter in any way --- no judging, no comparing,
        no commenting at all in any way that takes the focus of away
        from the object of the meditation. And let them know that if
        they do witness them selves lose focus to resist chastising
        themselves (IE: telling them selves things like "You're no
        good", or "You'll never be able to meditate", or anything
        similar that is also taking them away from focusing on their
        meditation), and to just say to their self "Oh well!" and
        go back to the meditation. And that will well open the door
        for their concentration to flow nicely and meditation and
        contemplation to occur. Oh yeah, we used to have just one
        rule, and that was that you were allowed to fall asleep, but
        now we need to also make sure all cell phones and pagers are
        turned off. I hope this is helpful and wish you well.
        Peace and blessings,
        Bob
      • john whitten
        Thanks Bob! I am really excited about this and hope the students get into it as well. It s been years since i ve done meditation myself and have been working
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 24, 2006
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          Thanks Bob! I am really excited about this and hope the students get into it as well. It's been years since i've done meditation myself and have been working on it at home to try to help model/guide the students. I am also using this as the subject for a action research project I'm doing for my masters degree so any supplementary research/support you could direct me to would be great. I am in Mexico so it would take a while for any mail to get here, but if you'd like ot send the CD great.
          Colegio Americano Puerto Vallarta
          Attn: John Whitten
          Albatross S/N Marina Vallarta
          Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco MX

          Thanks, John


          medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
          --- In meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com, john whitten
          <whittenjohn@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > I am interested in using meditation to improve focus, behaviour, and
          performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the
          meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find the the
          position, breathing pattern, physical relaxing technique, and
          emptying of mental and emotional reactivity methods that are
          referrred to to prepare for several of the techniques? Please help.
          Thanks, John whitten
          >
          Yo John,
          What a small universe this is. We taught dozens of our
          classes in an 8th grade classroom for the Haverford
          Adult Education Program. I think the average 8th grade
          classroom is a very challanging environment to teach
          meditation in, but also one of the most needed fro sharing
          this ancient knowledge. The vibes of decades of boredom,
          fear of flunking, general teen angst, etc, are heavy in
          the air, but thus so is the need to present an antedote.
          Anyway, we would start each class by having the students
          get as comfortable as they could in whatever position
          they preferred, close their eyes, and then guide them in
          tensing and then relaxing their body, part by part, from
          their toes to their scalp. BTW, There is a 17 or so minute
          version of this on our Guided Meditation CD. I'll be glad
          to send you a copy if you email me a mailing address, but
          you'll have to wait until I return from Arkansas where I'll
          be visiting my son and daughter-in- law for the next 9 days.
          In class, we usually did a 5 minute or so version of this.
          This also extrapolated into their learning just where they
          keep their tension, and then in "real life" be able to do
          spot checks throughout the day and just by focusing on their
          tension areas, be able to have all their tension release.
          For instance, if you usually keep tension in they shoulders,
          just by relaxing them, eventually your body (and emotions
          and mind) will relaxe simultaneously.
          OK - back to the class...After they are relaxed, and this
          simple technique will do it well, guide them in commanding
          their bodies to not fidgit, itch, ache, or in any way
          distract them from focusing on their meditation. Similarly,
          guide them in directing their emotions to not get too
          blissed out, too upset, or in any way bringing your focus
          away from the meditation. And then help them command their
          mind to not chatter in any way --- no judging, no comparing,
          no commenting at all in any way that takes the focus of away
          from the object of the meditation. And let them know that if
          they do witness them selves lose focus to resist chastising
          themselves (IE: telling them selves things like "You're no
          good", or "You'll never be able to meditate", or anything
          similar that is also taking them away from focusing on their
          meditation), and to just say to their self "Oh well!" and
          go back to the meditation. And that will well open the door
          for their concentration to flow nicely and meditation and
          contemplation to occur. Oh yeah, we used to have just one
          rule, and that was that you were allowed to fall asleep, but
          now we need to also make sure all cell phones and pagers are
          turned off. I hope this is helpful and wish you well.
          Peace and blessings,
          Bob



          Do you Yahoo!?
          Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.

        • medit8ionsociety
          Yo John, The CD is on its way. I hope that it will be helpful. BTW, I m sure the universe will present you with exactly what you need for your masters, as it
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 31, 2006
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            Yo John,
            The CD is on its way. I hope
            that it will be helpful. BTW, I'm
            sure the universe will present
            you with exactly what you need for
            your masters, as it will with all
            things.
            Peace and blessings,
            Bob
            --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, john whitten
            <whittenjohn@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Bob! I am really excited about this and hope the students get
            into it as well. It's been years since i've done meditation myself
            and have been working on it at home to try to help model/guide the
            students. I am also using this as the subject for a action research
            project I'm doing for my masters degree so any supplementary
            research/support you could direct me to would be great. I am in Mexico
            so it would take a while for any mail to get here, but if you'd like
            ot send the CD great.
            > Colegio Americano Puerto Vallarta
            > Attn: John Whitten
            > Albatross S/N Marina Vallarta
            > Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco MX
            >
            > Thanks, John
            >
            >
            > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
            --- In
            meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, john whitten
            > <whittenjohn@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I am interested in using meditation to improve focus, behaviour, and
            > performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the
            > meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find the the
            > position, breathing pattern, physical relaxing technique, and
            > emptying of mental and emotional reactivity methods that are
            > referrred to to prepare for several of the techniques? Please help.
            > Thanks, John whitten
            > >
            > Yo John,
            > What a small universe this is. We taught dozens of our
            > classes in an 8th grade classroom for the Haverford
            > Adult Education Program. I think the average 8th grade
            > classroom is a very challanging environment to teach
            > meditation in, but also one of the most needed fro sharing
            > this ancient knowledge. The vibes of decades of boredom,
            > fear of flunking, general teen angst, etc, are heavy in
            > the air, but thus so is the need to present an antedote.
            > Anyway, we would start each class by having the students
            > get as comfortable as they could in whatever position
            > they preferred, close their eyes, and then guide them in
            > tensing and then relaxing their body, part by part, from
            > their toes to their scalp. BTW, There is a 17 or so minute
            > version of this on our Guided Meditation CD. I'll be glad
            > to send you a copy if you email me a mailing address, but
            > you'll have to wait until I return from Arkansas where I'll
            > be visiting my son and daughter-in-law for the next 9 days.
            > In class, we usually did a 5 minute or so version of this.
            > This also extrapolated into their learning just where they
            > keep their tension, and then in "real life" be able to do
            > spot checks throughout the day and just by focusing on their
            > tension areas, be able to have all their tension release.
            > For instance, if you usually keep tension in they shoulders,
            > just by relaxing them, eventually your body (and emotions
            > and mind) will relaxe simultaneously.
            > OK - back to the class...After they are relaxed, and this
            > simple technique will do it well, guide them in commanding
            > their bodies to not fidgit, itch, ache, or in any way
            > distract them from focusing on their meditation. Similarly,
            > guide them in directing their emotions to not get too
            > blissed out, too upset, or in any way bringing your focus
            > away from the meditation. And then help them command their
            > mind to not chatter in any way --- no judging, no comparing,
            > no commenting at all in any way that takes the focus of away
            > from the object of the meditation. And let them know that if
            > they do witness them selves lose focus to resist chastising
            > themselves (IE: telling them selves things like "You're no
            > good", or "You'll never be able to meditate", or anything
            > similar that is also taking them away from focusing on their
            > meditation), and to just say to their self "Oh well!" and
            > go back to the meditation. And that will well open the door
            > for their concentration to flow nicely and meditation and
            > contemplation to occur. Oh yeah, we used to have just one
            > rule, and that was that you were allowed to fall asleep, but
            > now we need to also make sure all cell phones and pagers are
            > turned off. I hope this is helpful and wish you well.
            > Peace and blessings,
            > Bob
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
            >
          • john whitten
            Thanks again, We have begun practicing some positions and breathing exercises, they are receptive, but some are eager to advance more rapidly. I am trying to
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 5, 2006
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              Thanks again, We have begun practicing some positions and breathing exercises, they are receptive, but some are eager to advance more rapidly. I am trying to urge them to focus more on the process rather than achievement.setting goals. Is this a good idea? John

              medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              Yo John,
              The CD is on its way. I hope
              that it will be helpful. BTW, I'm
              sure the universe will present
              you with exactly what you need for
              your masters, as it will with all
              things.
              Peace and blessings,
              Bob
              --- In meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com, john whitten
              <whittenjohn@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks Bob! I am really excited about this and hope the students get
              into it as well. It's been years since i've done meditation myself
              and have been working on it at home to try to help model/guide the
              students. I am also using this as the subject for a action research
              project I'm doing for my masters degree so any supplementary
              research/support you could direct me to would be great. I am in Mexico
              so it would take a while for any mail to get here, but if you'd like
              ot send the CD great.
              > Colegio Americano Puerto Vallarta
              > Attn: John Whitten
              > Albatross S/N Marina Vallarta
              > Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco MX
              >
              > Thanks, John
              >
              >
              > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:
              --- In
              meditationsocietyof america@yahoogro ups.com, john whitten
              > <whittenjohn@ > wrote:
              > >
              > > I am interested in using meditation to improve focus, behaviour, and
              > performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the
              > meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find the the
              > position, breathing pattern, physical relaxing technique, and
              > emptying of mental and emotional reactivity methods that are
              > referrred to to prepare for several of the techniques? Please help.
              > Thanks, John whitten
              > >
              > Yo John,
              > What a small universe this is. We taught dozens of our
              > classes in an 8th grade classroom for the Haverford
              > Adult Education Program. I think the average 8th grade
              > classroom is a very challanging environment to teach
              > meditation in, but also one of the most needed fro sharing
              > this ancient knowledge. The vibes of decades of boredom,
              > fear of flunking, general teen angst, etc, are heavy in
              > the air, but thus so is the need to present an antedote.
              > Anyway, we would start each class by having the students
              > get as comfortable as they could in whatever position
              > they preferred, close their eyes, and then guide them in
              > tensing and then relaxing their body, part by part, from
              > their toes to their scalp. BTW, There is a 17 or so minute
              > version of this on our Guided Meditation CD. I'll be glad
              > to send you a copy if you email me a mailing address, but
              > you'll have to wait until I return from Arkansas where I'll
              > be visiting my son and daughter-in- law for the next 9 days.
              > In class, we usually did a 5 minute or so version of this.
              > This also extrapolated into their learning just where they
              > keep their tension, and then in "real life" be able to do
              > spot checks throughout the day and just by focusing on their
              > tension areas, be able to have all their tension release.
              > For instance, if you usually keep tension in they shoulders,
              > just by relaxing them, eventually your body (and emotions
              > and mind) will relaxe simultaneously.
              > OK - back to the class...After they are relaxed, and this
              > simple technique will do it well, guide them in commanding
              > their bodies to not fidgit, itch, ache, or in any way
              > distract them from focusing on their meditation. Similarly,
              > guide them in directing their emotions to not get too
              > blissed out, too upset, or in any way bringing your focus
              > away from the meditation. And then help them command their
              > mind to not chatter in any way --- no judging, no comparing,
              > no commenting at all in any way that takes the focus of away
              > from the object of the meditation. And let them know that if
              > they do witness them selves lose focus to resist chastising
              > themselves (IE: telling them selves things like "You're no
              > good", or "You'll never be able to meditate", or anything
              > similar that is also taking them away from focusing on their
              > meditation), and to just say to their self "Oh well!" and
              > go back to the meditation. And that will well open the door
              > for their concentration to flow nicely and meditation and
              > contemplation to occur. Oh yeah, we used to have just one
              > rule, and that was that you were allowed to fall asleep, but
              > now we need to also make sure all cell phones and pagers are
              > turned off. I hope this is helpful and wish you well.
              > Peace and blessings,
              > Bob
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------ --------- --------- ---
              > Do you Yahoo!?
              > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
              >



              How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! MessengerÂ’s low PC-to-Phone call rates.

            • medit8ionsociety
              ... breathing exercises, they are receptive, but some are eager to advance more rapidly. I am trying to urge them to focus more on the process rather than
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 5, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, john whitten
                <whittenjohn@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks again, We have begun practicing some positions and
                breathing exercises, they are receptive, but some are eager to
                advance more rapidly. I am trying to urge them to focus more on the
                process rather than achievement.setting goals. Is this a good idea?
                John
                >
                Yo John,
                You are right that the process is important,
                but if the progress is what they desire to
                be able to judge, we have a technique that
                allows that to be assessed over time. It's
                called 108 - An Easy Hard Meditation Technique
                and canbe found on our web site, Meditation Station,
                along with dozens more,
                http://www.meditationsociety.com
                Here it is and I hope it will be beneficial.
                Peace and blessings,
                Bob
                108 - An Easy Hard Meditation Technique
                Anything in life that brings you closer to inner
                peace can be said to be "good". Anything that
                takes your peace away is "bad". Of course, it is
                a given that anything that only brings you
                momentary peace, like drugs, is not good. To
                really qualify, the peace must be everlasting.
                Very often, good, and thus peace, doesn't come
                easily. For instance, politically and historically,
                it has often taken a war to bring about a lasting
                peace between enemies. An example of this can be
                found in the relationships between America, Japan,
                Russia, and Germany. Deadly enemies during World
                War II, and now close partners involved in mutual
                progress and at peace.

                Within ourselves there is a similar inner world
                war-like interaction going on between the mind,
                body, and emotions that prevents us from knowing
                real peace. As the events in our life take place,
                we react mentally, physically, and emotionally,
                sometimes more one way and at other times more in
                another. This slave-like reactivity makes our life
                seem out of control, bouncing back and forth
                between joy and sorrow, and without lasting peace.
                This anxiety and conflict filled state can be
                witnessed by an inner awareness that is our Real
                Self. This Witness to our life has always been
                there/here, silent, non-labeling, non-commenting,
                non-judging, and is present now.

                As you are reading these words, your Witness is
                aware of your mind's mentations, your body's
                sensations, and your emotion's feelings. If your
                inner chattering stops rambling on, you can sit
                back in your mind's eye and Witness your body/ego's
                reactions. It is at a moment when this occurs that
                what has been called your higher intuitive center
                kicks in and you will know, with a gut feeling,
                just what to do. You will then be able to witness
                your mind, body, and emotions act, and either cease
                the reactivity that has taken away your peace, or
                start to do that which will bring about peace in
                your life.

                For instance, you may have been banging your head
                against the wall for years, even though this
                caused you to suffer terribly. Your friends may
                have told you countless times that your life would
                be more peaceful if you would just stop doing this
                foolish activity. But, you never listened, or
                perhaps justified it as worth continuing with for
                some silly and illogical reason such as that it
                felt so good when you stopped. Witness yourself now.
                Did you just see yourself laugh, or react in a "Yep!
                That's me!" embarrassment? Did your mind get angry
                and defensive and deny that this concept could apply
                to you? Are you witnessing now? And now?

                Just as it is unlikely that you would continue
                to keep banging your head against the wall once
                you really recognized that you were doing it, once
                you witness yourself reacting to life's events
                inappropriately (in a way that steals your peace
                away from you), you will stop doing it and thus
                allow peace to fill and stay with you. The 108
                Meditation technique is one of the best at letting you witness your
                mind's activity.

                Relax yourself in the way you have found best
                prepares you for meditating. Focus your attention
                on your breath. Observe and feel air come into
                the body, stay, and leave the body. Silently say
                "One". Do it again and say "Two". On and on up
                to 108. This seems to be very easy to do, but don't
                be surprised, when you first try this inner exercise,
                if you can't concentrate well enough to get all the
                way up to 108 without being distracted by your
                thoughts, physical sensations, or emotions. Your
                mind has been your master and you have been it's
                slave your whole life, and it's not going to let
                you be in charge without giving you a very hard
                battle for control. Your mind has caused you to
                fritter away your most of your life rehashing the
                past and fantasizing about the future and will
                rebel if you try to live and control your life as
                it takes place.

                Your breath always occurs in the present moment.
                Thus, if you are paying attention to your breath,
                you have the potential of experiencing reality,
                for it too can only occur now, in the present. Inner
                peace is not something for the past or the future.
                It is available and present now. We just must stop
                being distracted from it. When we do this technique,
                and we watch our mind take us away from the object
                of our meditation, our breath, we must not scold
                ourselves. If we see that we are concentrating very
                well, we must not get too overjoyed. Both extremes
                are distractions.

                What is especially wonderful about this technique
                is that you can become aware of what causes your
                distraction as well as what happens as a result of
                your distraction. For instance, you may find that
                if you try to do this with your eyes open, something
                may catch your eye and you will start thinking about
                it. But, this is not necessarily bad because you may
                then have learned that it is easier to do this
                technique with your eyes shut and that this does
                bring more peace into your life. So, in a way, you
                may gain greater insight from "failing" at
                maintaining your concentration than from paying
                attention.

                Another benefit that this method gives us is that
                we can gauge our progress over time. For instance,
                when you first try it, you may only get up to the
                number 12 before your mind's chattering, or your
                body's twitching, or your emotion's swings
                distract you. Then, perhaps a week later, you may
                find that you are able to maintain your attention
                up to 48. A 400% improvement!

                Eventually, you will be able to silently witness
                your mind obediently accomplishing the task you
                have assigned it and you will get to 108
                successfully. It will be then that you can be
                considered the master, and your mind, body, and
                emotions, the slaves. They then can be used as
                valuable tools that will help you attain the
                consistent inner peace that you have been seeking.
                Easily!

                Perhaps the greatest asset this technique offers
                is that you will become more and more aware of,
                and start identifying with, the Witness within -
                the pure, blissful, serene consciousness that is
                your Real Self. You will then need no tools,
                techniques, or concepts, and will live happily
                ever after.






                > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                wrote: Yo John,
                > The CD is on its way. I hope
                > that it will be helpful. BTW, I'm
                > sure the universe will present
                > you with exactly what you need for
                > your masters, as it will with all
                > things.
                > Peace and blessings,
                > Bob
                > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, john whitten
                > <whittenjohn@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Thanks Bob! I am really excited about this and hope the
                students get
                > into it as well. It's been years since i've done meditation
                myself
                > and have been working on it at home to try to help model/guide
                the
                > students. I am also using this as the subject for a action
                research
                > project I'm doing for my masters degree so any supplementary
                > research/support you could direct me to would be great. I am in
                Mexico
                > so it would take a while for any mail to get here, but if you'd
                like
                > ot send the CD great.
                > > Colegio Americano Puerto Vallarta
                > > Attn: John Whitten
                > > Albatross S/N Marina Vallarta
                > > Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco MX
                > >
                > > Thanks, John
                > >
                > >
                > > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                wrote:
                > --- In
                > meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, john whitten
                > > <whittenjohn@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I am interested in using meditation to improve focus,
                behaviour, and
                > > performance with my 8th grade class. After investigating the
                > > meditation techniques I have a question: where can I find
                the the
                > > position, breathing pattern, physical relaxing technique, and
                > > emptying of mental and emotional reactivity methods that are
                > > referrred to to prepare for several of the techniques?
                Please help.
                > > Thanks, John whitten
                > > >
                > > Yo John,
                > > What a small universe this is. We taught dozens of our
                > > classes in an 8th grade classroom for the Haverford
                > > Adult Education Program. I think the average 8th grade
                > > classroom is a very challanging environment to teach
                > > meditation in, but also one of the most needed fro sharing
                > > this ancient knowledge. The vibes of decades of boredom,
                > > fear of flunking, general teen angst, etc, are heavy in
                > > the air, but thus so is the need to present an antedote.
                > > Anyway, we would start each class by having the students
                > > get as comfortable as they could in whatever position
                > > they preferred, close their eyes, and then guide them in
                > > tensing and then relaxing their body, part by part, from
                > > their toes to their scalp. BTW, There is a 17 or so minute
                > > version of this on our Guided Meditation CD. I'll be glad
                > > to send you a copy if you email me a mailing address, but
                > > you'll have to wait until I return from Arkansas where I'll
                > > be visiting my son and daughter-in-law for the next 9 days.
                > > In class, we usually did a 5 minute or so version of this.
                > > This also extrapolated into their learning just where they
                > > keep their tension, and then in "real life" be able to do
                > > spot checks throughout the day and just by focusing on their
                > > tension areas, be able to have all their tension release.
                > > For instance, if you usually keep tension in they shoulders,
                > > just by relaxing them, eventually your body (and emotions
                > > and mind) will relaxe simultaneously.
                > > OK - back to the class...After they are relaxed, and this
                > > simple technique will do it well, guide them in commanding
                > > their bodies to not fidgit, itch, ache, or in any way
                > > distract them from focusing on their meditation. Similarly,
                > > guide them in directing their emotions to not get too
                > > blissed out, too upset, or in any way bringing your focus
                > > away from the meditation. And then help them command their
                > > mind to not chatter in any way --- no judging, no comparing,
                > > no commenting at all in any way that takes the focus of away
                > > from the object of the meditation. And let them know that if
                > > they do witness them selves lose focus to resist chastising
                > > themselves (IE: telling them selves things like "You're no
                > > good", or "You'll never be able to meditate", or anything
                > > similar that is also taking them away from focusing on their
                > > meditation), and to just say to their self "Oh well!" and
                > > go back to the meditation. And that will well open the door
                > > for their concentration to flow nicely and meditation and
                > > contemplation to occur. Oh yeah, we used to have just one
                > > rule, and that was that you were allowed to fall asleep, but
                > > now we need to also make sure all cell phones and pagers are
                > > turned off. I hope this is helpful and wish you well.
                > > Peace and blessings,
                > > Bob
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ---------------------------------
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                > > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
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