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Re: The wrong kind of emptiness question

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  • Jeff Belyea
    ... and ... the ... some ... sporadic ... emotion. And ... been, ... Hi Stephen - Here s an opinion: The benefits of meditation that you have experienced are
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 19, 2006
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen
      Johnston" <stephen.johnston@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I have found meditation to be immensely beneficial in terms of my
      > relationships with other people, my ability to be compassionate
      and
      > loving, and to increase my sense of personal well-being. Most of
      the
      > time my mood is much better than it used to be, and I'm regaining
      some
      > of that lost wonder of childhood.
      >
      > HOWEVER, sometimes I feel that my meditating is also creating
      sporadic
      > feelings of emptiness (not the right kind) and deadness of
      emotion. And
      > although I am geberally more patient and loving than I have ever
      been,
      > when these episodes hit I can become quite irritable.
      >
      > Has anybody else experienced this?
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Stephen
      >

      Hi Stephen -

      Here's an opinion: The benefits
      of meditation that you have experienced
      are wonderful, as you know. There is
      also an experience of meditation that is
      dramatic and sometimes startling (in
      the right way). A prelude to this
      sudden in rush of insight or wisdom
      is often this feelng of emptiness,
      tinged with a free-floating sense of
      fear of dread. This is the "ego", or
      an aspect of ego, that has exerted
      control over our identity to the
      point that we feel that our very
      being is essentially our thoughts,
      senses and emotions. As we approach
      the absolute silence of meditation,
      another identity begins to emerge.
      This "threatens" our previously
      held sense of self. But if you
      stay with it, it will emerge, and
      the threatened self of self (small
      s) will be delighted to be "visited"
      by the higher Self (big S). And
      now, a new identity is superimposed
      over our older, and now relegated
      to secondary, identity. We have
      become whole. It's an incredible
      joy, an astounding rush. Stick
      with it.

      Jeff
    • Stephen Johnston
      Hi Jeff, Thhat sounds very interesting, and might describe what is happening. It feels right intuitively, but the only thing that keeps from saying Yes!
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 19, 2006
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        Hi Jeff,

        Thhat sounds very interesting, and might describe what is happening.
        It feels right intuitively, but the only thing that keeps from
        saying "Yes! That's it!" is the fact that I have only been meditating
        for a couple of months. However, I did have a sort of spiritual
        experience a few months ago that spontaneously created the feelings I
        now associate with meditation, so perhaps something along those lines
        really is happening.

        Thanks for your insightful response.

        Regards,

        Stephen


        >
        > Here's an opinion: The benefits
        > of meditation that you have experienced
        > are wonderful, as you know. There is
        > also an experience of meditation that is
        > dramatic and sometimes startling (in
        > the right way). A prelude to this
        > sudden in rush of insight or wisdom
        > is often this feelng of emptiness,
        > tinged with a free-floating sense of
        > fear of dread. This is the "ego", or
        > an aspect of ego, that has exerted
        > control over our identity to the
        > point that we feel that our very
        > being is essentially our thoughts,
        > senses and emotions. As we approach
        > the absolute silence of meditation,
        > another identity begins to emerge.
        > This "threatens" our previously
        > held sense of self. But if you
        > stay with it, it will emerge, and
        > the threatened self of self (small
        > s) will be delighted to be "visited"
        > by the higher Self (big S). And
        > now, a new identity is superimposed
        > over our older, and now relegated
        > to secondary, identity. We have
        > become whole. It's an incredible
        > joy, an astounding rush. Stick
        > with it.
        >
        > Jeff
        >
      • Jeff Belyea
        Hi Stephen - Some people who begin a meditation practice spend years to realize any sort of spiritual experience , and some are rewarded almost immediately.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 19, 2006
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          Hi Stephen -

          Some people who begin
          a meditation practice
          spend years to realize
          any "sort of spiritual
          experience", and some
          are rewarded almost
          immediately. It probably
          depends a great deal
          of the heart and sincerity
          and motivation of the
          meditator, and the particular
          teachings or teacher.

          Peace and loving awareness,

          Jeff



          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen
          Johnston" <stephen.johnston@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jeff,
          >
          > Thhat sounds very interesting, and might describe what is
          happening.
          > It feels right intuitively, but the only thing that keeps from
          > saying "Yes! That's it!" is the fact that I have only been
          meditating
          > for a couple of months. However, I did have a sort of spiritual
          > experience a few months ago that spontaneously created the
          feelings I
          > now associate with meditation, so perhaps something along those
          lines
          > really is happening.
          >
          > Thanks for your insightful response.
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Stephen
          >
          >
          > >
          > > Here's an opinion: The benefits
          > > of meditation that you have experienced
          > > are wonderful, as you know. There is
          > > also an experience of meditation that is
          > > dramatic and sometimes startling (in
          > > the right way). A prelude to this
          > > sudden in rush of insight or wisdom
          > > is often this feelng of emptiness,
          > > tinged with a free-floating sense of
          > > fear of dread. This is the "ego", or
          > > an aspect of ego, that has exerted
          > > control over our identity to the
          > > point that we feel that our very
          > > being is essentially our thoughts,
          > > senses and emotions. As we approach
          > > the absolute silence of meditation,
          > > another identity begins to emerge.
          > > This "threatens" our previously
          > > held sense of self. But if you
          > > stay with it, it will emerge, and
          > > the threatened self of self (small
          > > s) will be delighted to be "visited"
          > > by the higher Self (big S). And
          > > now, a new identity is superimposed
          > > over our older, and now relegated
          > > to secondary, identity. We have
          > > become whole. It's an incredible
          > > joy, an astounding rush. Stick
          > > with it.
          > >
          > > Jeff
          > >
          >
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