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  • medit8ionsociety
    Here s the question (the meditation technique mentioned from our site can be found at: http://www.meditationsociety.com/week24.html I have much difficulty
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 22, 2006
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      Here's the question (the meditation technique mentioned
      from our site can be found at:
      http://www.meditationsociety.com/week24.html

      I have much difficulty letting go of resentment,
      self-pity re people in my past. Looking at (for example)
      meditation # 91, how can one apply this to people long deceased?

      Here's the answer I emailed, and if you have any comments or other
      things you'd like to add, I'm sure they will be welcomed:

      Hi,
      I hadn't checked out #91 in a long time. It is actually
      one we used to do often in class, and many people
      remembered deceased people (mostly parents) who had
      caused them suffering. The same rule of thumb applies -
      have compassion for them. Even though they no longer
      have physical bodies, they still have some form of "body"
      within you. One added idea is to remember that they are no
      longer here and can't add to the pain they have caused you,
      and only you can allow/cause the pain to continue. Drop it!
      It's like a heavy bag that you have been carrying around
      needlessly. If something takes your peace away, and can't
      "really" force itself on you, just leave it behind. Whenever
      you witness yourself thinking about it/them, just change
      your thoughts to those type thoughts/feelings that do bring
      you peace. At the very least, do something silly or
      frivolous, or anything that's upfull. It's much healthier
      for you than beating a dead horse, which I think in this case
      is a pretty accurate cliche. And the more you meditate, the
      more and more you will be in the position to be able to
      witness your thoughts as they arise and dissipate those that
      cause you to suffer. I wish you well.
      Peace and blessings,
      Bob Rose, President,
      Mediatation Society of America
    • aideenmck
      ... Thanks so much for your reply. It s not so much a heavy bag as it is a sore that I perversely enjoy picking at. I intend to stop!
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 24, 2006
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        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
        <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here's the question (the meditation technique mentioned
        > from our site can be found at:
        > http://www.meditationsociety.com/week24.html
        >
        > I have much difficulty letting go of resentment,
        > self-pity re people in my past. Looking at (for example)
        > meditation # 91, how can one apply this to people long deceased?
        >
        > Here's the answer I emailed, and if you have any comments or other
        > things you'd like to add, I'm sure they will be welcomed:
        >
        > Hi,
        > I hadn't checked out #91 in a long time. It is actually
        > one we used to do often in class, and many people
        > remembered deceased people (mostly parents) who had
        > caused them suffering. The same rule of thumb applies -
        > have compassion for them. Even though they no longer
        > have physical bodies, they still have some form of "body"
        > within you. One added idea is to remember that they are no
        > longer here and can't add to the pain they have caused you,
        > and only you can allow/cause the pain to continue. Drop it!
        > It's like a heavy bag that you have been carrying around
        > needlessly. If something takes your peace away, and can't
        > "really" force itself on you, just leave it behind. Whenever
        > you witness yourself thinking about it/them, just change
        > your thoughts to those type thoughts/feelings that do bring
        > you peace. At the very least, do something silly or
        > frivolous, or anything that's upfull. It's much healthier
        > for you than beating a dead horse, which I think in this case
        > is a pretty accurate cliche. And the more you meditate, the
        > more and more you will be in the position to be able to
        > witness your thoughts as they arise and dissipate those that
        > cause you to suffer. I wish you well.
        > Peace and blessings,
        > Bob Rose, President,
        > Mediatation Society of America
        >
        Thanks so much for your reply. It's not so much a heavy bag as it
        is a sore that I perversely enjoy picking at. I intend to stop!
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