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The Path of "Wake The Hell Up!"

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  • Judi Rhodes
    I actually don t care to be around Marla very much, not because she won t make any progress from her perspective while she s here - which she won t - and not
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 23, 2002
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      I actually don't care to be around Marla very much, not because she won't make any progress from her perspective while she's here - which she won't - and not because she'll quickly leave for the next cool-sounding spiritual adventure - which she will - but because the particular flavor, for want of a better word, of her ego is off-putting.

      Marla cloaks herself in spirituality rather than dealing with the fear she seeks to conceal. It's always fear beneath the surface, of course, no matter how it manifests. With Marla, the fear revolves around money, and security and relationships and vanity, all boiling down to fear of rejection and loneliness, which further boils down to the black diamond at the hert of all fears, fear of no-self. She's very self-possessed on the outside; calm, smooth, convinced that she's a very open and spiritually attuned person, but I'd much rather be with a raving looney who was directly confronting their bullshit than with someone who spends all their energy repressing it. The cloaking thing always strikes a tinny not that would register as jarring and discordant to anyone able to "hear" it.

      "I had an experience in mediation I wanted to share with you," Marla begins, and proceeds to reel off a string of insights that she feels aid her in becoming free of something or other, or maybe's she's overcome an obstacle or slain a dragon or something. I know within the first few words that she's trying to impress me so that I will reward her with praise. It's a common enough dynamic. She assumes we have an unspoken agreement in which her part is to reflect and reinforce my self-image as a Great Spiritual Teacher so that I, in turn, will reflect and reinforce her self-image as a Very Spiritual Person. She assumes we have this unspoken agreement because she had it with the dozen or so other spiritual teachers and it's always worked out well - a nice win-win situation.

      I interrupt.

      "Have you heard the term makyo?" I ask her.

      "Yes, isn't it like something to do with...?"

      "It's a Zen thing. Very handy term. In Zen, no one is interested in spiritual growth. No one is interested in self-exploration or self realization. They're not trying to become better people or happier people. They're not following a spiritual path, they're following a wake-the-hell-up path. They're completely focused on the hot and narrow pursuit of enligtenment. There's no consolation prize, no secondary objective. Full awkening is what they signed up for. Of course, as students, they have no real idea of what such a pursuit actually entails, so it's the job of the master to see that they stay on course. With me so far?"

      "The term Tao warns us to beware the flowery trappings of the path, or words to that effect. There are many things to see and do on the path to awakening. It's all new and magical. There are points, for instance, whre you can stop and develop what you might consider special powers, prophecy, telepathy, mediumship, magical arts, plate spinning, whatever. During Zen meditation - zazen, the student might merge into timeless unity consciousness. He might unravel all the complexities of his life in a single glorious sitting. He might feel that he as vomited a gigantic ball of molten lead that has resided in his chest for years. He might descend into the pits of hell and slay his demons. After such experiences, he might turn to his master to share his victories and experiences, thinking he's well on the road to enlightenment, only to have the master splash him with cold water by calling it makyo."

      Marla is frowning now, realizing that she's the one being splashed with cold water.

      When a Zen master uses the term makyo, he's telling his students that the precious gems they're stopping to pick up or the pretty flowers they're pausing to collect only have value or beauty in the world thye've chosen to leave behind. The Tao says "beware the flowery trappings because, in order to possess them or benefit from them, you must cease your journey, stay in the dream. Ultimately, they're just a distraction from the tricky business of waking up. Breaking free of delusion takes everything you have. The price of truth is everything. EVERYTHING. That's the rule and it's inviolable.

      ..........

      That essentially defines the quest for enlightenmnet; the you that you think of as you (and that thinks of you as you, and so on) is not you, it's just the charachter that the underlying truth of you is dreaming into brief existence. Enlightenment isn't the charachter, it's in the underlying truth. Now there's nothing wrong with being a dream charachter, of course, unless it's your goal to wake up, in which case the dream charchter must be ruthlessly annihilated. If you desire is to experience transcendental bliss or supreme love or altered states of consciousness or awakened kundalini, or to qualify for heaven, or to liberate all sentient beings, or simply to become the best dang person you can be, then rejoice! you're in the right place, the dream state, the dualistic universe. However, if you're interest is to cut the crap and figure out what's true, then you're in the wrong place and you've got a very messy fight ahead and there's no point in pretending otherwise.

      I hear a sniffle. Marla feels rebuked. The master has diminised her offering. That's how she should feel. Those Zen studnets aren't getting the giggles when that stick comes down.

      ******** Jed McKenna



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • medit8ionsociety
      Thanks Judi for sharing this great excerpt from Jed s book Spiritual Enlightenment . For more about the book: http://www.WisefoolPress.com To see Judi singing
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 23, 2002
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        Thanks Judi for sharing this great excerpt from Jed's book "Spiritual
        Enlightenment". For more about the book:
        http://www.WisefoolPress.com
        To see Judi singing similar songs about the "real" facts of life,
        check out her web site at:
        http://www.users.uniserve.com/%7Esamuel/judi-1.htm

        "Judi Rhodes" <judirhodes@z...> wrote:
        > I actually don't care to be around Marla very much, not because she
        won't make any progress from her perspective while she's here - which
        she won't - and not because she'll quickly leave for the next
        cool-sounding spiritual adventure - which she will - but because the
        particular flavor, for want of a better word, of her ego is
        off-putting.
        >
        > Marla cloaks herself in spirituality rather than dealing with the
        fear she seeks to conceal. It's always fear beneath the surface, of
        course, no matter how it manifests. With Marla, the fear revolves
        around money, and security and relationships and vanity, all boiling
        down to fear of rejection and loneliness, which further boils down to
        the black diamond at the hert of all fears, fear of no-self. She's
        very self-possessed on the outside; calm, smooth, convinced that she's
        a very open and spiritually attuned person, but I'd much rather be
        with a raving looney who was directly confronting their bullshit than
        with someone who spends all their energy repressing it. The cloaking
        thing always strikes a tinny not that would register as jarring and
        discordant to anyone able to "hear" it.
        >
        > "I had an experience in mediation I wanted to share with you," Marla
        begins, and proceeds to reel off a string of insights that she feels
        aid her in becoming free of something or other, or maybe's she's
        overcome an obstacle or slain a dragon or something. I know within the
        first few words that she's trying to impress me so that I will reward
        her with praise. It's a common enough dynamic. She assumes we have an
        unspoken agreement in which her part is to reflect and reinforce my
        self-image as a Great Spiritual Teacher so that I, in turn, will
        reflect and reinforce her self-image as a Very Spiritual Person. She
        assumes we have this unspoken agreement because she had it with the
        dozen or so other spiritual teachers and it's always worked out well -
        a nice win-win situation.
        >
        > I interrupt.
        >
        > "Have you heard the term makyo?" I ask her.
        >
        > "Yes, isn't it like something to do with...?"
        >
        > "It's a Zen thing. Very handy term. In Zen, no one is interested in
        spiritual growth. No one is interested in self-exploration or self
        realization. They're not trying to become better people or happier
        people. They're not following a spiritual path, they're following a
        wake-the-hell-up path. They're completely focused on the hot and
        narrow pursuit of enligtenment. There's no consolation prize, no
        secondary objective. Full awkening is what they signed up for. Of
        course, as students, they have no real idea of what such a pursuit
        actually entails, so it's the job of the master to see that they stay
        on course. With me so far?"
        >
        > "The term Tao warns us to beware the flowery trappings of the path,
        or words to that effect. There are many things to see and do on the
        path to awakening. It's all new and magical. There are points, for
        instance, whre you can stop and develop what you might consider
        special powers, prophecy, telepathy, mediumship, magical arts, plate
        spinning, whatever. During Zen meditation - zazen, the student might
        merge into timeless unity consciousness. He might unravel all the
        complexities of his life in a single glorious sitting. He might feel
        that he as vomited a gigantic ball of molten lead that has resided in
        his chest for years. He might descend into the pits of hell and slay
        his demons. After such experiences, he might turn to his master to
        share his victories and experiences, thinking he's well on the road to
        enlightenment, only to have the master splash him with cold water by
        calling it makyo."
        >
        > Marla is frowning now, realizing that she's the one being splashed
        with cold water.
        >
        > When a Zen master uses the term makyo, he's telling his students
        that the precious gems they're stopping to pick up or the pretty
        flowers they're pausing to collect only have value or beauty in the
        world thye've chosen to leave behind. The Tao says "beware the flowery
        trappings because, in order to possess them or benefit from them, you
        must cease your journey, stay in the dream. Ultimately, they're just a
        distraction from the tricky business of waking up. Breaking free of
        delusion takes everything you have. The price of truth is everything.
        EVERYTHING. That's the rule and it's inviolable.
        >
        > ..........
        >
        > That essentially defines the quest for enlightenmnet; the you that
        you think of as you (and that thinks of you as you, and so on) is not
        you, it's just the charachter that the underlying truth of you is
        dreaming into brief existence. Enlightenment isn't the charachter,
        it's in the underlying truth. Now there's nothing wrong with being a
        dream charachter, of course, unless it's your goal to wake up, in
        which case the dream charchter must be ruthlessly annihilated. If you
        desire is to experience transcendental bliss or supreme love or
        altered states of consciousness or awakened kundalini, or to qualify
        for heaven, or to liberate all sentient beings, or simply to become
        the best dang person you can be, then rejoice! you're in the right
        place, the dream state, the dualistic universe. However, if you're
        interest is to cut the crap and figure out what's true, then you're in
        the wrong place and you've got a very messy fight ahead and there's no
        point in pretending otherwise.
        >
        > I hear a sniffle. Marla feels rebuked. The master has diminised her
        offering. That's how she should feel. Those Zen studnets aren't
        getting the giggles when that stick comes down.
        >
        > ******** Jed McKenna
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • judirhodes <judirhodes@zianet.com>
        I actually don t care to be around Marla very much, not because she won t make any progress from her perspective while she s here - which she won t - and not
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 16, 2003
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          I actually don't care to be around Marla very much, not because she
          won't make any progress from her perspective while she's here - which
          she won't - and not because she'll quickly leave for the next cool-
          sounding spiritual adventure - which she will - but because the
          particular flavor, for want of a better word, of her ego is off-
          putting.

          Marla cloaks herself in spirituality rather than dealing with the
          fear she seeks to conceal. It's always fear beneath the surface, of
          course, no matter how it manifests. With Marla, the fear revolves
          around money, and security and relationships and vanity, all boiling
          down to fear of rejection and loneliness, which further boils down to
          the black diamond at the hert of all fears, fear of no-self. She's
          very self-possessed on the outside; calm, smooth, convinced that
          she's a very open and spiritually attuned person, but I'd much rather
          be with a raving looney who was directly confronting their bullshit
          than with someone who spends all their energy repressing it. The
          cloaking thing always strikes a tinny not that would register as
          jarring and discordant to anyone able to "hear" it.

          "I had an experience in mediation I wanted to share with you," Marla
          begins, and proceeds to reel off a string of insights that she feels
          aid her in becoming free of something or other, or maybe's she's
          overcome an obstacle or slain a dragon or something. I know within
          the first few words that she's trying to impress me so that I will
          reward her with praise. It's a common enough dynamic. She assumes we
          have an unspoken agreement in which her part is to reflect and
          reinforce my self-image as a Great Spiritual Teacher so that I,
          in turn, will reflect and reinforce her self-image as a Very
          Spiritual Person. She assumes we have this unspoken agreement because
          she had it with the dozen or so other spiritual teachers and it's
          always worked out well - a nice win-win situation.

          I interrupt.

          "Have you heard the term makyo?" I ask her.

          "Yes, isn't it like something to do with...?"

          "It's a Zen thing. Very handy term. In Zen, no one is interested in
          spiritual growth. No one is interested in self-exploration or self
          realization. They're not trying to become better people or happier
          people. They're not following a spiritual path, they're following a
          wake-the-hell-up path. They're completely focused on the hot and
          narrow pursuit of enligtenment. There's no consolation
          prize, no secondary objective. Full awkening is what they signed up
          for. Of course, as students, they have no real idea of what such a
          pursuit actually entails, so it's the job of the master to see that
          they stay on course. With me so far?"

          "The term Tao warns us to beware the flowery trappings of the path,
          or words to that effect. There are many things to see and do on the
          path to awakening. It's all new and magical. There are points, for
          instance, whre you can stop and develop what you might consider
          special powers, prophecy, telepathy, mediumship, magical arts, plate
          spinning, whatever. During Zen meditation - zazen, the student might
          merge into timeless unity consciousness. He might unravel all the
          complexities of his life in a single glorious sitting. He might
          feel that he as vomited a gigantic ball of molten lead that has
          resided in his chest for years. He might descend into the pits of
          hell and slay his demons. After such experiences, he might turn to
          his master to share his victories and experiences, thinking he's well
          on the road to enlightenment, only to have the master splash him with
          cold water by calling it makyo."

          Marla is frowning now, realizing that she's the one being splashed
          with cold water.

          When a Zen master uses the term makyo, he's telling his students that
          the precious gems they're stopping to pick up or the pretty flowers
          they're pausing to collect only have value or beauty in the world
          thye've chosen to leave behind. The Tao says "beware the flowery
          trappings because, in order to possess them or benefit from them, you
          must cease your journey, stay in the dream.
          Ultimately, they're just a distraction from the tricky business of
          waking up. Breaking free of delusion takes everything you have. The
          price of truth is everything. EVERYTHING. That's the rule and it's
          inviolable.

          ..........

          That essentially defines the quest for enlightenmnet; the you that
          you think of as you (and that thinks of you as you, and so on) is not
          you, it's just the charachter that the underlying truth of you is
          dreaming into brief existence. Enlightenment isn't the charachter,
          it's in the underlying truth. Now there's nothing wrong with being a
          dream charachter, of course, unless it's your goal
          to wake up, in which case the dream charchter must be ruthlessly
          annihilated.
          If you desire is to experience transcendental bliss or supreme love
          or altered states of consciousness or awakened kundalini, or to
          qualify for heaven, or to liberate all sentient beings, or simply to
          become the best dang person you can be, then rejoice! you're in the
          right place, the dream state, the dualistic universe. However, if
          you're interest is to cut the crap and figure out what's
          true, then you're in the wrong place and you've got a very messy
          fight ahead and there's no point in pretending otherwise.

          I hear a sniffle. Marla feels rebuked. The master has diminised her
          offering. That's how she should feel. Those Zen studnets aren't
          getting the giggles when that stick comes down.

          ******** Jed McKenna
        • Harmony Moore
          Thank you for this message Jed... I hope Marla knows she is NOT alone, maybe all students need splashed with cold water. I better go take a polar bear swim, I
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 16, 2003
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            Thank you for this message Jed... I hope Marla knows she is NOT alone, maybe all students need splashed with cold water. I better go take a polar bear swim, I bet I am about to be tossed into a freezing pool myself.
            Sincerely,
            Harmony

            "The term Tao warns us to beware the flowery trappings of the path,
            or words to that effect. There are many things to see and do on the
            path to awakening. It's all new and magical. There are points, for
            instance, whre you can stop and develop what you might consider
            special powers, prophecy, telepathy, mediumship, magical arts, plate
            spinning, whatever. During Zen meditation - zazen, the student might
            merge into timeless unity consciousness. He might unravel all the
            complexities of his life in a single glorious sitting. He might
            feel that he as vomited a gigantic ball of molten lead that has
            resided in his chest for years. He might descend into the pits of
            hell and slay his demons. After such experiences, he might turn to
            his master to share his victories and experiences, thinking he's well
            on the road to enlightenment, only to have the master splash him with
            cold water by calling it makyo."

            Marla is frowning now, realizing that she's the one being splashed
            with cold water.

            When a Zen master uses the term makyo, he's telling his students that
            the precious gems they're stopping to pick up or the pretty flowers
            they're pausing to collect only have value or beauty in the world
            thye've chosen to leave behind. The Tao says "beware the flowery
            trappings because, in order to possess them or benefit from them, you
            must cease your journey, stay in the dream.
            Ultimately, they're just a distraction from the tricky business of
            waking up. Breaking free of delusion takes everything you have. The
            price of truth is everything. EVERYTHING. That's the rule and it's
            inviolable.

            ..........
            That's how she should feel. Those Zen studnets aren't
            getting the giggles when that stick comes down.

            ******** Jed McKenna



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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • judirhodes <judirhodes@zianet.com>
            ... alone, maybe all students need splashed with cold water. I better go take a polar bear swim, I bet I am about to be tossed into a freezing pool myself.
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 16, 2003
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              --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, Harmony Moore
              <mooreharmony2002@y...> wrote:
              >
              > Thank you for this message Jed... I hope Marla knows she is NOT
              alone, maybe all students need splashed with cold water. I better go
              take a polar bear swim, I bet I am about to be tossed into a freezing
              pool myself.
              > Sincerely,
              > Harmony
              >
              ****** Marla is alone and all the *ramifications* that go along with
              it. "I-dentity" in a *nutshell*. :-)

              And that was from Jed McKenna's book, Spiritual Enlightenment, The
              Damndest Thing.

              Judi
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