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Meditation is calming

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  • Era
    New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things you feel when you re in love can be explained by the presence
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27, 2004
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      New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is
      essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things you
      feel when you're in love can be explained by the
      presence of certain chemicals—-say, phenyl ethylamine
      which is associated with a feeling of bliss or
      oxytocin that's found to be high in breast-feeding
      mothers.

      While research on the subject is still not
      conclusive, there are suggestions that religious and
      spiritual experiences, too, might be built into the
      complex circuitry of our brains. At least that's what
      research in two American universities appear to
      indicate.

      Research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison
      and the University of California, San Francisco, on
      Buddhist monks showed that parts of the brain dealing
      with positive emotions and self-control were more
      active, while those associated with memory of fear
      were relatively calmer, leading researchers to believe
      that Buddhist monks who appear happy and calm were are
      genuinely so.

      To take the research on spiritual experience
      further, Andrew Newburg, a radiologist at the
      University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, scanned
      the brains of Buddhist monks and Franciscan nuns in
      meditation or prayer and the results were fascinating.

      First, the prefrontal cortex -or the part of the
      brain dealing with positive emotions -was seething
      with activity. More interestingly, the parietal lobes
      showed very little activity. What are parietal lobes?
      These lobes are part of the cerebrum and are
      associated with two functions, the orientation of the
      body in space and the perception of space and time.

      To be more precise, the left superior parietal lobe
      creates the perception of the body's physical
      boundaries and the right superior parietal lobe
      creates the perception of physical space outside of
      the body. Since, during meditation, the parietal lobes
      are unable to create the perception of space and
      linear time that are an essential part of our
      consciousness, it gives rise to a sensation of
      infinity and timelessness.

      That's one take. Here's another. Dr Michael
      Persinger at Laurentian University studied the brain
      scans of temporal lobe of epileptic patients who
      reported having mystical experiences. He then
      artificially induced temporal lobe seizures on
      volunteers and their reactions were the same as the
      epileptics —-religious dream-like hallucinations and
      the volunteers sensing `spectral presence´ in the room
      with them.

      Dr Persinger suggests this could be because of the
      presence of the temporal cortex inside the temporal
      lobes. The left hemisphere of the temporal cortex is
      responsible for one's awareness of self. When the
      activity in this cortex gets out of sync, as happens
      in a seizure, the left hemisphere perceives the right
      hemisphere as a `sensed presence´ separate from
      itself, which could be interpreted as God.

      Another part of the brain that could be playing a
      role in religious experiences is the limbic system.
      Limbic stimulation is known to bring richness to
      experience. Jeffery Saver, a researcher at UCLA, says
      that during a religious experience the limbic system
      becomes unusually active, which makes everything that
      happens during an experience especially significant.
      In fact, even elaborate religious ceremonies,
      involving things like chanting and rituals, make the
      brain tag the rituals as different from everyday
      activities. This, in turn, triggers activity in the
      limbic system leading to a feeling of bliss.

      Skeptics will interpret the scientific findings as
      proof that God does not exist, because we can
      scientifically replicate mystical religious
      experiences. However, Newberg himself says that while
      he has a sense of his own spirituality, his agenda for
      research doesn't include determining whether god
      exists or not. That, according to him, is a different
      question from trying to determine the neurology of
      spiritual and religious experiences.


      metta, Era
    • Santino_50
      Hello Group, My view is that science can tell us the HOW of many processes -- the step-by-step interactions that got us from crawling creatures to human
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 28, 2004
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        Hello Group,

        My view is that science can tell us the HOW of many
        processes -- the step-by-step interactions that got us
        from crawling creatures to human beings. But the
        questions of WHY are beyond its scope. Because we can
        explain a process does not mean that we understand its
        essential substance. That's the area of religion and
        spirituality. I don't see a conflict. I wouldn't go
        to a scientist for a philosophical or spiritual
        assessment anymore than I would go to a spiritual
        guide for a scientific one.

        Just my $0.02

        thanks,

        Patrick


        --- Era <mi_nok@...> wrote:

        > New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is
        > essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things
        > you
        > feel when you're in love can be explained by the
        > presence of certain chemicals�-say, phenyl
        > ethylamine
        > which is associated with a feeling of bliss or
        > oxytocin that's found to be high in breast-feeding
        > mothers.
        >
        > While research on the subject is still not
        > conclusive, there are suggestions that religious and
        > spiritual experiences, too, might be built into the
        > complex circuitry of our brains. At least that's
        > what
        > research in two American universities appear to
        > indicate.
        >
        > Research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison
        > and the University of California, San Francisco, on
        > Buddhist monks showed that parts of the brain
        > dealing
        > with positive emotions and self-control were more
        > active, while those associated with memory of fear
        > were relatively calmer, leading researchers to
        > believe
        > that Buddhist monks who appear happy and calm were
        > are
        > genuinely so.
        >
        > To take the research on spiritual experience
        > further, Andrew Newburg, a radiologist at the
        > University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, scanned
        > the brains of Buddhist monks and Franciscan nuns in
        > meditation or prayer and the results were
        > fascinating.
        >
        > First, the prefrontal cortex -or the part of the
        > brain dealing with positive emotions -was seething
        > with activity. More interestingly, the parietal
        > lobes
        > showed very little activity. What are parietal
        > lobes?
        > These lobes are part of the cerebrum and are
        > associated with two functions, the orientation of
        > the
        > body in space and the perception of space and time.
        >
        > To be more precise, the left superior parietal lobe
        > creates the perception of the body's physical
        > boundaries and the right superior parietal lobe
        > creates the perception of physical space outside of
        > the body. Since, during meditation, the parietal
        > lobes
        > are unable to create the perception of space and
        > linear time that are an essential part of our
        > consciousness, it gives rise to a sensation of
        > infinity and timelessness.
        >
        > That's one take. Here's another. Dr Michael
        > Persinger at Laurentian University studied the brain
        > scans of temporal lobe of epileptic patients who
        > reported having mystical experiences. He then
        > artificially induced temporal lobe seizures on
        > volunteers and their reactions were the same as the
        > epileptics �-religious dream-like hallucinations and
        > the volunteers sensing `spectral presence� in the
        > room
        > with them.
        >
        > Dr Persinger suggests this could be because of the
        > presence of the temporal cortex inside the temporal
        > lobes. The left hemisphere of the temporal cortex is
        > responsible for one's awareness of self. When the
        > activity in this cortex gets out of sync, as happens
        > in a seizure, the left hemisphere perceives the
        > right
        > hemisphere as a `sensed presence� separate from
        > itself, which could be interpreted as God.
        >
        > Another part of the brain that could be playing a
        > role in religious experiences is the limbic system.
        > Limbic stimulation is known to bring richness to
        > experience. Jeffery Saver, a researcher at UCLA,
        > says
        > that during a religious experience the limbic system
        > becomes unusually active, which makes everything
        > that
        > happens during an experience especially significant.
        > In fact, even elaborate religious ceremonies,
        > involving things like chanting and rituals, make the
        > brain tag the rituals as different from everyday
        > activities. This, in turn, triggers activity in the
        > limbic system leading to a feeling of bliss.
        >
        > Skeptics will interpret the scientific findings as
        > proof that God does not exist, because we can
        > scientifically replicate mystical religious
        > experiences. However, Newberg himself says that
        > while
        > he has a sense of his own spirituality, his agenda
        > for
        > research doesn't include determining whether god
        > exists or not. That, according to him, is a
        > different
        > question from trying to determine the neurology of
        > spiritual and religious experiences.
        >
        >
        > metta, Era
        >
        >
        >
        >




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      • Nina
        ... not even two cents, Nina
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 28, 2004
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          :) Maybe the 'how' IS the 'why'.

          not even two cents,
          Nina

          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, Santino_50
          <santino_50@y...> wrote:
          > Hello Group,
          >
          > My view is that science can tell us the HOW of many
          > processes -- the step-by-step interactions that got us
          > from crawling creatures to human beings. But the
          > questions of WHY are beyond its scope. Because we can
          > explain a process does not mean that we understand its
          > essential substance. That's the area of religion and
          > spirituality. I don't see a conflict. I wouldn't go
          > to a scientist for a philosophical or spiritual
          > assessment anymore than I would go to a spiritual
          > guide for a scientific one.
          >
          > Just my $0.02
          >
          > thanks,
          >
          > Patrick
          >
          >
          > --- Era <mi_nok@y...> wrote:
          >
          > > New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is
          > > essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things
          > > you
          > > feel when you're in love can be explained by the
          > > presence of certain chemicals—-say, phenyl
          > > ethylamine
          > > which is associated with a feeling of bliss or
          > > oxytocin that's found to be high in breast-feeding
          > > mothers.
          > >
          > > While research on the subject is still not
          > > conclusive, there are suggestions that religious and
          > > spiritual experiences, too, might be built into the
          > > complex circuitry of our brains. At least that's
          > > what
          > > research in two American universities appear to
          > > indicate.
          > >
          > > Research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison
          > > and the University of California, San Francisco, on
          > > Buddhist monks showed that parts of the brain
          > > dealing
          > > with positive emotions and self-control were more
          > > active, while those associated with memory of fear
          > > were relatively calmer, leading researchers to
          > > believe
          > > that Buddhist monks who appear happy and calm were
          > > are
          > > genuinely so.
          > >
          > > To take the research on spiritual experience
          > > further, Andrew Newburg, a radiologist at the
          > > University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, scanned
          > > the brains of Buddhist monks and Franciscan nuns in
          > > meditation or prayer and the results were
          > > fascinating.
          > >
          > > First, the prefrontal cortex -or the part of the
          > > brain dealing with positive emotions -was seething
          > > with activity. More interestingly, the parietal
          > > lobes
          > > showed very little activity. What are parietal
          > > lobes?
          > > These lobes are part of the cerebrum and are
          > > associated with two functions, the orientation of
          > > the
          > > body in space and the perception of space and time.
          > >
          > > To be more precise, the left superior parietal lobe
          > > creates the perception of the body's physical
          > > boundaries and the right superior parietal lobe
          > > creates the perception of physical space outside of
          > > the body. Since, during meditation, the parietal
          > > lobes
          > > are unable to create the perception of space and
          > > linear time that are an essential part of our
          > > consciousness, it gives rise to a sensation of
          > > infinity and timelessness.
          > >
          > > That's one take. Here's another. Dr Michael
          > > Persinger at Laurentian University studied the brain
          > > scans of temporal lobe of epileptic patients who
          > > reported having mystical experiences. He then
          > > artificially induced temporal lobe seizures on
          > > volunteers and their reactions were the same as the
          > > epileptics —-religious dream-like hallucinations and
          > > the volunteers sensing `spectral presence´ in the
          > > room
          > > with them.
          > >
          > > Dr Persinger suggests this could be because of the
          > > presence of the temporal cortex inside the temporal
          > > lobes. The left hemisphere of the temporal cortex is
          > > responsible for one's awareness of self. When the
          > > activity in this cortex gets out of sync, as happens
          > > in a seizure, the left hemisphere perceives the
          > > right
          > > hemisphere as a `sensed presence´ separate from
          > > itself, which could be interpreted as God.
          > >
          > > Another part of the brain that could be playing a
          > > role in religious experiences is the limbic system.
          > > Limbic stimulation is known to bring richness to
          > > experience. Jeffery Saver, a researcher at UCLA,
          > > says
          > > that during a religious experience the limbic system
          > > becomes unusually active, which makes everything
          > > that
          > > happens during an experience especially significant.
          > > In fact, even elaborate religious ceremonies,
          > > involving things like chanting and rituals, make the
          > > brain tag the rituals as different from everyday
          > > activities. This, in turn, triggers activity in the
          > > limbic system leading to a feeling of bliss.
          > >
          > > Skeptics will interpret the scientific findings as
          > > proof that God does not exist, because we can
          > > scientifically replicate mystical religious
          > > experiences. However, Newberg himself says that
          > > while
          > > he has a sense of his own spirituality, his agenda
          > > for
          > > research doesn't include determining whether god
          > > exists or not. That, according to him, is a
          > > different
          > > question from trying to determine the neurology of
          > > spiritual and religious experiences.
          > >
          > >
          > > metta, Era
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > _______________________________
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today!
          > http://vote.yahoo.com
        • Jeff Belyea
          Meat that thinks and meat that has a spritual experience? Where s the love, women? (ü) ... Santino_50
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 28, 2004
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            Meat that thinks
            and meat that
            has a spritual
            experience?

            Where's the love,
            women?

            (ü)


            --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Nina"
            <murrkis@y...> wrote:
            > :) Maybe the 'how' IS the 'why'.
            >
            > not even two cents,
            > Nina
            >
            > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com,
            Santino_50
            > <santino_50@y...> wrote:
            > > Hello Group,
            > >
            > > My view is that science can tell us the HOW of many
            > > processes -- the step-by-step interactions that got us
            > > from crawling creatures to human beings. But the
            > > questions of WHY are beyond its scope. Because we can
            > > explain a process does not mean that we understand its
            > > essential substance. That's the area of religion and
            > > spirituality. I don't see a conflict. I wouldn't go
            > > to a scientist for a philosophical or spiritual
            > > assessment anymore than I would go to a spiritual
            > > guide for a scientific one.
            > >
            > > Just my $0.02
            > >
            > > thanks,
            > >
            > > Patrick
            > >
            > >
            > > --- Era <mi_nok@y...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is
            > > > essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things
            > > > you
            > > > feel when you're in love can be explained by the
            > > > presence of certain chemicals—-say, phenyl
            > > > ethylamine
            > > > which is associated with a feeling of bliss or
            > > > oxytocin that's found to be high in breast-feeding
            > > > mothers.
            > > >
            > > > While research on the subject is still not
            > > > conclusive, there are suggestions that religious and
            > > > spiritual experiences, too, might be built into the
            > > > complex circuitry of our brains. At least that's
            > > > what
            > > > research in two American universities appear to
            > > > indicate.
            > > >
            > > > Research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison
            > > > and the University of California, San Francisco, on
            > > > Buddhist monks showed that parts of the brain
            > > > dealing
            > > > with positive emotions and self-control were more
            > > > active, while those associated with memory of fear
            > > > were relatively calmer, leading researchers to
            > > > believe
            > > > that Buddhist monks who appear happy and calm were
            > > > are
            > > > genuinely so.
            > > >
            > > > To take the research on spiritual experience
            > > > further, Andrew Newburg, a radiologist at the
            > > > University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, scanned
            > > > the brains of Buddhist monks and Franciscan nuns in
            > > > meditation or prayer and the results were
            > > > fascinating.
            > > >
            > > > First, the prefrontal cortex -or the part of the
            > > > brain dealing with positive emotions -was seething
            > > > with activity. More interestingly, the parietal
            > > > lobes
            > > > showed very little activity. What are parietal
            > > > lobes?
            > > > These lobes are part of the cerebrum and are
            > > > associated with two functions, the orientation of
            > > > the
            > > > body in space and the perception of space and time.
            > > >
            > > > To be more precise, the left superior parietal lobe
            > > > creates the perception of the body's physical
            > > > boundaries and the right superior parietal lobe
            > > > creates the perception of physical space outside of
            > > > the body. Since, during meditation, the parietal
            > > > lobes
            > > > are unable to create the perception of space and
            > > > linear time that are an essential part of our
            > > > consciousness, it gives rise to a sensation of
            > > > infinity and timelessness.
            > > >
            > > > That's one take. Here's another. Dr Michael
            > > > Persinger at Laurentian University studied the brain
            > > > scans of temporal lobe of epileptic patients who
            > > > reported having mystical experiences. He then
            > > > artificially induced temporal lobe seizures on
            > > > volunteers and their reactions were the same as the
            > > > epileptics —-religious dream-like hallucinations and
            > > > the volunteers sensing `spectral presence´ in the
            > > > room
            > > > with them.
            > > >
            > > > Dr Persinger suggests this could be because of the
            > > > presence of the temporal cortex inside the temporal
            > > > lobes. The left hemisphere of the temporal cortex is
            > > > responsible for one's awareness of self. When the
            > > > activity in this cortex gets out of sync, as happens
            > > > in a seizure, the left hemisphere perceives the
            > > > right
            > > > hemisphere as a `sensed presence´ separate from
            > > > itself, which could be interpreted as God.
            > > >
            > > > Another part of the brain that could be playing a
            > > > role in religious experiences is the limbic system.
            > > > Limbic stimulation is known to bring richness to
            > > > experience. Jeffery Saver, a researcher at UCLA,
            > > > says
            > > > that during a religious experience the limbic system
            > > > becomes unusually active, which makes everything
            > > > that
            > > > happens during an experience especially significant.
            > > > In fact, even elaborate religious ceremonies,
            > > > involving things like chanting and rituals, make the
            > > > brain tag the rituals as different from everyday
            > > > activities. This, in turn, triggers activity in the
            > > > limbic system leading to a feeling of bliss.
            > > >
            > > > Skeptics will interpret the scientific findings as
            > > > proof that God does not exist, because we can
            > > > scientifically replicate mystical religious
            > > > experiences. However, Newberg himself says that
            > > > while
            > > > he has a sense of his own spirituality, his agenda
            > > > for
            > > > research doesn't include determining whether god
            > > > exists or not. That, according to him, is a
            > > > different
            > > > question from trying to determine the neurology of
            > > > spiritual and religious experiences.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > metta, Era
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > _______________________________
            > > Do you Yahoo!?
            > > Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today!
            > > http://vote.yahoo.com
          • Nina
            Hehe, I got plenty of love, right here in my luteinizing hormones. Surge, baby, surge! If you can t see the love in the how , then I might ask you the
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 28, 2004
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              Hehe, I got plenty of love,
              right here in my luteinizing
              hormones. Surge, baby, surge!

              If you can't see the love
              in the 'how', then I might ask
              you the similar:

              "Where's the love, man?"

              ;) Nina

              --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Belyea"
              <jeff@m...> wrote:
              > Meat that thinks
              > and meat that
              > has a spritual
              > experience?
              >
              > Where's the love,
              > women?
              >
              > (ü)
              >
              >
              > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Nina"
              > <murrkis@y...> wrote:
              > > :) Maybe the 'how' IS the 'why'.
              > >
              > > not even two cents,
              > > Nina
              > >
              > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com,
              > Santino_50
              > > <santino_50@y...> wrote:
              > > > Hello Group,
              > > >
              > > > My view is that science can tell us the HOW of many
              > > > processes -- the step-by-step interactions that got us
              > > > from crawling creatures to human beings. But the
              > > > questions of WHY are beyond its scope. Because we can
              > > > explain a process does not mean that we understand its
              > > > essential substance. That's the area of religion and
              > > > spirituality. I don't see a conflict. I wouldn't go
              > > > to a scientist for a philosophical or spiritual
              > > > assessment anymore than I would go to a spiritual
              > > > guide for a scientific one.
              > > >
              > > > Just my $0.02
              > > >
              > > > thanks,
              > > >
              > > > Patrick
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- Era <mi_nok@y...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is
              > > > > essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things
              > > > > you
              > > > > feel when you're in love can be explained by the
              > > > > presence of certain chemicals—-say, phenyl
              > > > > ethylamine
              > > > > which is associated with a feeling of bliss or
              > > > > oxytocin that's found to be high in breast-feeding
              > > > > mothers.
              > > > >
              > > > > While research on the subject is still not
              > > > > conclusive, there are suggestions that religious and
              > > > > spiritual experiences, too, might be built into the
              > > > > complex circuitry of our brains. At least that's
              > > > > what
              > > > > research in two American universities appear to
              > > > > indicate.
              > > > >
              > > > > Research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison
              > > > > and the University of California, San Francisco, on
              > > > > Buddhist monks showed that parts of the brain
              > > > > dealing
              > > > > with positive emotions and self-control were more
              > > > > active, while those associated with memory of fear
              > > > > were relatively calmer, leading researchers to
              > > > > believe
              > > > > that Buddhist monks who appear happy and calm were
              > > > > are
              > > > > genuinely so.
              > > > >
              > > > > To take the research on spiritual experience
              > > > > further, Andrew Newburg, a radiologist at the
              > > > > University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, scanned
              > > > > the brains of Buddhist monks and Franciscan nuns in
              > > > > meditation or prayer and the results were
              > > > > fascinating.
              > > > >
              > > > > First, the prefrontal cortex -or the part of the
              > > > > brain dealing with positive emotions -was seething
              > > > > with activity. More interestingly, the parietal
              > > > > lobes
              > > > > showed very little activity. What are parietal
              > > > > lobes?
              > > > > These lobes are part of the cerebrum and are
              > > > > associated with two functions, the orientation of
              > > > > the
              > > > > body in space and the perception of space and time.
              > > > >
              > > > > To be more precise, the left superior parietal lobe
              > > > > creates the perception of the body's physical
              > > > > boundaries and the right superior parietal lobe
              > > > > creates the perception of physical space outside of
              > > > > the body. Since, during meditation, the parietal
              > > > > lobes
              > > > > are unable to create the perception of space and
              > > > > linear time that are an essential part of our
              > > > > consciousness, it gives rise to a sensation of
              > > > > infinity and timelessness.
              > > > >
              > > > > That's one take. Here's another. Dr Michael
              > > > > Persinger at Laurentian University studied the brain
              > > > > scans of temporal lobe of epileptic patients who
              > > > > reported having mystical experiences. He then
              > > > > artificially induced temporal lobe seizures on
              > > > > volunteers and their reactions were the same as the
              > > > > epileptics —-religious dream-like hallucinations and
              > > > > the volunteers sensing `spectral presence´ in the
              > > > > room
              > > > > with them.
              > > > >
              > > > > Dr Persinger suggests this could be because of the
              > > > > presence of the temporal cortex inside the temporal
              > > > > lobes. The left hemisphere of the temporal cortex is
              > > > > responsible for one's awareness of self. When the
              > > > > activity in this cortex gets out of sync, as happens
              > > > > in a seizure, the left hemisphere perceives the
              > > > > right
              > > > > hemisphere as a `sensed presence´ separate from
              > > > > itself, which could be interpreted as God.
              > > > >
              > > > > Another part of the brain that could be playing a
              > > > > role in religious experiences is the limbic system.
              > > > > Limbic stimulation is known to bring richness to
              > > > > experience. Jeffery Saver, a researcher at UCLA,
              > > > > says
              > > > > that during a religious experience the limbic system
              > > > > becomes unusually active, which makes everything
              > > > > that
              > > > > happens during an experience especially significant.
              > > > > In fact, even elaborate religious ceremonies,
              > > > > involving things like chanting and rituals, make the
              > > > > brain tag the rituals as different from everyday
              > > > > activities. This, in turn, triggers activity in the
              > > > > limbic system leading to a feeling of bliss.
              > > > >
              > > > > Skeptics will interpret the scientific findings as
              > > > > proof that God does not exist, because we can
              > > > > scientifically replicate mystical religious
              > > > > experiences. However, Newberg himself says that
              > > > > while
              > > > > he has a sense of his own spirituality, his agenda
              > > > > for
              > > > > research doesn't include determining whether god
              > > > > exists or not. That, according to him, is a
              > > > > different
              > > > > question from trying to determine the neurology of
              > > > > spiritual and religious experiences.
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > metta, Era
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > _______________________________
              > > > Do you Yahoo!?
              > > > Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today!
              > > > http://vote.yahoo.com
            • Jeff Belyea
              In the dewing. (ü) ... Belyea ... can
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 28, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                In the dewing. (ü)


                --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Nina"
                <murrkis@y...> wrote:
                > Hehe, I got plenty of love,
                > right here in my luteinizing
                > hormones. Surge, baby, surge!
                >
                > If you can't see the love
                > in the 'how', then I might ask
                > you the similar:
                >
                > "Where's the love, man?"
                >
                > ;) Nina
                >
                > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff
                Belyea"
                > <jeff@m...> wrote:
                > > Meat that thinks
                > > and meat that
                > > has a spritual
                > > experience?
                > >
                > > Where's the love,
                > > women?
                > >
                > > (ü)
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Nina"
                > > <murrkis@y...> wrote:
                > > > :) Maybe the 'how' IS the 'why'.
                > > >
                > > > not even two cents,
                > > > Nina
                > > >
                > > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com,
                > > Santino_50
                > > > <santino_50@y...> wrote:
                > > > > Hello Group,
                > > > >
                > > > > My view is that science can tell us the HOW of many
                > > > > processes -- the step-by-step interactions that got us
                > > > > from crawling creatures to human beings. But the
                > > > > questions of WHY are beyond its scope. Because we
                can
                > > > > explain a process does not mean that we understand its
                > > > > essential substance. That's the area of religion and
                > > > > spirituality. I don't see a conflict. I wouldn't go
                > > > > to a scientist for a philosophical or spiritual
                > > > > assessment anymore than I would go to a spiritual
                > > > > guide for a scientific one.
                > > > >
                > > > > Just my $0.02
                > > > >
                > > > > thanks,
                > > > >
                > > > > Patrick
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --- Era <mi_nok@y...> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > > New Delhi: Modern science tells us that love is
                > > > > > essentially a chemical phenomenon. All the things
                > > > > > you
                > > > > > feel when you're in love can be explained by the
                > > > > > presence of certain chemicals—-say, phenyl
                > > > > > ethylamine
                > > > > > which is associated with a feeling of bliss or
                > > > > > oxytocin that's found to be high in breast-feeding
                > > > > > mothers.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > While research on the subject is still not
                > > > > > conclusive, there are suggestions that religious and
                > > > > > spiritual experiences, too, might be built into the
                > > > > > complex circuitry of our brains. At least that's
                > > > > > what
                > > > > > research in two American universities appear to
                > > > > > indicate.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Research at the University of Wisconsin at Madison
                > > > > > and the University of California, San Francisco, on
                > > > > > Buddhist monks showed that parts of the brain
                > > > > > dealing
                > > > > > with positive emotions and self-control were more
                > > > > > active, while those associated with memory of fear
                > > > > > were relatively calmer, leading researchers to
                > > > > > believe
                > > > > > that Buddhist monks who appear happy and calm were
                > > > > > are
                > > > > > genuinely so.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > To take the research on spiritual experience
                > > > > > further, Andrew Newburg, a radiologist at the
                > > > > > University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, scanned
                > > > > > the brains of Buddhist monks and Franciscan nuns in
                > > > > > meditation or prayer and the results were
                > > > > > fascinating.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > First, the prefrontal cortex -or the part of the
                > > > > > brain dealing with positive emotions -was seething
                > > > > > with activity. More interestingly, the parietal
                > > > > > lobes
                > > > > > showed very little activity. What are parietal
                > > > > > lobes?
                > > > > > These lobes are part of the cerebrum and are
                > > > > > associated with two functions, the orientation of
                > > > > > the
                > > > > > body in space and the perception of space and time.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > To be more precise, the left superior parietal lobe
                > > > > > creates the perception of the body's physical
                > > > > > boundaries and the right superior parietal lobe
                > > > > > creates the perception of physical space outside of
                > > > > > the body. Since, during meditation, the parietal
                > > > > > lobes
                > > > > > are unable to create the perception of space and
                > > > > > linear time that are an essential part of our
                > > > > > consciousness, it gives rise to a sensation of
                > > > > > infinity and timelessness.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > That's one take. Here's another. Dr Michael
                > > > > > Persinger at Laurentian University studied the brain
                > > > > > scans of temporal lobe of epileptic patients who
                > > > > > reported having mystical experiences. He then
                > > > > > artificially induced temporal lobe seizures on
                > > > > > volunteers and their reactions were the same as the
                > > > > > epileptics —-religious dream-like hallucinations and
                > > > > > the volunteers sensing `spectral presence´ in the
                > > > > > room
                > > > > > with them.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Dr Persinger suggests this could be because of the
                > > > > > presence of the temporal cortex inside the temporal
                > > > > > lobes. The left hemisphere of the temporal cortex is
                > > > > > responsible for one's awareness of self. When the
                > > > > > activity in this cortex gets out of sync, as happens
                > > > > > in a seizure, the left hemisphere perceives the
                > > > > > right
                > > > > > hemisphere as a `sensed presence´ separate from
                > > > > > itself, which could be interpreted as God.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Another part of the brain that could be playing a
                > > > > > role in religious experiences is the limbic system.
                > > > > > Limbic stimulation is known to bring richness to
                > > > > > experience. Jeffery Saver, a researcher at UCLA,
                > > > > > says
                > > > > > that during a religious experience the limbic system
                > > > > > becomes unusually active, which makes everything
                > > > > > that
                > > > > > happens during an experience especially significant.
                > > > > > In fact, even elaborate religious ceremonies,
                > > > > > involving things like chanting and rituals, make the
                > > > > > brain tag the rituals as different from everyday
                > > > > > activities. This, in turn, triggers activity in the
                > > > > > limbic system leading to a feeling of bliss.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Skeptics will interpret the scientific findings as
                > > > > > proof that God does not exist, because we can
                > > > > > scientifically replicate mystical religious
                > > > > > experiences. However, Newberg himself says that
                > > > > > while
                > > > > > he has a sense of his own spirituality, his agenda
                > > > > > for
                > > > > > research doesn't include determining whether god
                > > > > > exists or not. That, according to him, is a
                > > > > > different
                > > > > > question from trying to determine the neurology of
                > > > > > spiritual and religious experiences.
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > metta, Era
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > _______________________________
                > > > > Do you Yahoo!?
                > > > > Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today!
                > > > > http://vote.yahoo.com
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