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Re: Do we get residuals on re-runs Jody?

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  • jodyrrr
    ... Hey Jeff. [snip] ... Perhaps. However, I d contend that s a new development. IOW, that wasn t part of the original specification. Meditation did not
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 30, 2004
      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Belyea"
      <jeff@m...> wrote:
      > Hi Jody -

      Hey Jeff.

      [snip]

      > Certainly, psychology offers a
      > proven model for dealing with
      > life's perceived ups and downs.
      > And so does meditation.

      Perhaps. However, I'd contend that's
      a new development. IOW, that wasn't
      part of the original specification.
      Meditation did not develop as a self-
      help technique. That came in the early
      20th century.

      Making meditation a replacement for
      psychotherapy may extend its marketability,
      but it's not an approach that all meditation
      teachers would recommend.


      [snip]

      > Much psychotherapy is focused on
      > reassessment of life experiences;

      Not exactly. Psychotherapy is about
      relieving emotional tension. One way
      to accomplish this is by way of life
      assessement. The reassessment comes
      after, when the emotional polarity
      has been somewhat neutralized.

      > kind of, "If I only knew then,
      > what I know now". For example,
      > when one looks back at an event
      > that had a powerful impact, at
      > an earlier point in life and
      > reassesses their reaction from
      > a more mature and insightful
      > point of view, it is thought
      > that they can find emotional
      > release from that earlier impact,
      > realize that their reaction was
      > immature and even a misinterpretation,
      > and thereby effect an emotional
      > healing.

      That's not my impression of psycho-
      therapy at all. It's reliving past
      events to unlock the emotional potential
      that is stored there. That happens
      completely outside of any subjective
      evaluations as to what was correct
      or incorrect about the reaction at
      the time.

      This isn't to say that looking back
      doesn't reveal the mistakes we made,
      but a good psychotherapist isn't going
      to view them as such, nor recommmend that
      they be viewed as mistakes by their clients.

      > Unfortunately, what so often
      > happens in therapy; such as in
      > support groups and the constellation
      > model, is that the revisiting
      > and stirring of old issues effects
      > something very much like kicking
      > old horseshit. The stink returns
      > and the earlier emotional impact,
      > rather than being lessened,
      > is exacerbated.

      That's not the fault of psychotherapy,
      just a crappy therapist.

      > Nice theory, catharsis,
      > but in many (if not most) cases
      > there is no release, only a
      > revisiting of a bad dream, over
      > and over and over...for years.

      That statement seemingly contradicts
      my entire life.

      > The "patient" never finds release
      > and comes to be ensnared in the
      > support group's childish
      > sentimentality - and all the
      > personal attention it brings.
      > At this point, the one who comes
      > for therapy has discovered a
      > way to become the focus of
      > attention, the recipient of
      > endless hugs and tears...and
      > this is their pay off. No way
      > will they let go of the emotional
      > impact, because each time they
      > rerun the movie, they get all
      > kinds of sympathy and attention.

      Again, bad therapist. No cookie.

      [snip]

      > Nice theory, meditation. The idea
      > that entering a silence of the mind
      > will trigger a "response" from God,
      > from our higher Self, is one that
      > has captured the imagination since...

      That's your theory of meditation, Jeff.
      Mine is this: mind is entrained by the
      repetition of mantra, or silence, or
      whatever. Mental discipline follows,
      and mind content becomes less cluttered.

      That's the ideal situation. In many folks,
      dark stuff gets stirred up. It has to for
      progress to occur. A [good] therapist can
      be very helpful if this occurs, and it does
      occur. It did in me, and in a number of
      others I've known in my life.

      IOW, a good, effective meditation practice
      isn't always peaches and creme. In fact, if
      you don't run into a few shadows, it's not
      doing much of anything for you with regards
      to personal transformation, IMO.

      [snip]

      > Meditators and therapy clients
      > meet each other going the other
      > way everyday.
      >
      >
      > Papajeff

      And some find that by walking in both
      directions, they end up just where they wanted
      to be more quickly and with more clarity than
      if they'd just gone one way or the other.

      --jody
    • Jeff Belyea
      Thanks, Jody. It seems that meditation, yoga, visualization, guided imagery, relaxation techniques and even contemporary hypnotherapy - acknowledged in 1957 by
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 31, 2004
        Thanks, Jody. It seems that
        meditation, yoga, visualization,
        guided imagery, relaxation
        techniques and even contemporary
        hypnotherapy - acknowledged in
        1957 by the medical establishment
        (sorry for the hold-over hippie
        vocabulary) are being blended
        more and more into "mainstream"
        therapies and overall healthcare,
        education, business and sport.

        Billions are being spent on
        these "alternative or complementary"
        approaches to well-being. And
        sometimes, they go more
        efficiently and wholistically
        to the "heart" of the matter.

        Agreed that a combination
        of good counsel and meditation
        can be the best route for some.

        However...

        The spiritual aspect of meditation
        need not get lost in its relatively
        new role in the self-help (Self-help)
        arena. Even here, it can be
        breakthrough-useful as an
        "applied metaphysics".

        God most probably doesn't
        need man's psychotherapy. (ü)

        Best,

        Jeff
      • jodyrrr
        ... wrote: [snip] ... Only when He manifests as us men (and women.) ... --jody.
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 31, 2004
          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Belyea"
          <jeff@m...> wrote:

          [snip]

          > The spiritual aspect of meditation
          > need not get lost in its relatively
          > new role in the self-help (Self-help)
          > arena. Even here, it can be
          > breakthrough-useful as an
          > "applied metaphysics".
          >
          > God most probably doesn't
          > need man's psychotherapy. (ü)

          Only when He manifests as us men (and women.)

          > Best,
          >
          > Jeff

          --jody.
        • Jeff Belyea
          ... Belyea ... Sure, even though we are made manifest in the image of God, what is encountered (or possibly wired into us) when manifested in this physical,
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 31, 2004
            --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "jodyrrr"
            <jodyrrr@y...> wrote:
            > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff
            Belyea"
            > <jeff@m...> wrote:
            >
            > [snip]
            >
            > > The spiritual aspect of meditation
            > > need not get lost in its relatively
            > > new role in the self-help (Self-help)
            > > arena. Even here, it can be
            > > breakthrough-useful as an
            > > "applied metaphysics".
            > >
            > > God most probably doesn't
            > > need man's psychotherapy. (ü)
            >
            > Only when He manifests as us men (and women.)
            >
            > > Best,
            > >
            > > Jeff
            >
            > --jody.

            Sure, even though we are
            made manifest in the image of God,
            what is encountered (or possibly
            wired into us) when manifested
            in this physical, rational form,
            is the genesis of the feeling of
            separation - what is called maya
            or illusion in some traditions; and
            the feeling that we are (our identity is)
            the manifest, rather than the spirit,
            a spark of God's own fire.

            Forgetting that we are within God,
            or being coerced out of knowing this
            (socialization - being force-fed from
            the tree of duality) is what prepares
            the ground for dark disturbing doubts -
            not only about religion or sprituality, but
            about who we are at our core.

            Meditation, at its loftiest, is one
            vehicle for dispelling the notion
            that we are separate from God.

            In meditation, either formal or
            the meditative state that a
            mountain range or a sunrise
            can provoke, we can potentially
            discover that the answer to "Who Am I"
            is not this manifest flesh and blood
            container, but rather the Self that
            is the unmanifest spirit, a play
            of consciousness, eternal,
            within God, inseparable from God.

            Enjoying the day,

            Jeff
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