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Re: Meditation newbie question

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  • Nina
    ... on ... So ... Hi, Slink, I find that when I focus too precisely or sternly, that such pains are more likely to crop up. Try letting your focus become a bit
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 7, 2004
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, Lord_Slinky@y...
      wrote:
      > Hi Bob,
      >
      > Thanks for the link, I'll check it out. As for that "not right
      > feeling". I've been suffering from minor sinus headaches off and
      on
      > for the past year (although i don't often take clarinex for it).
      So
      > I take it its not normal for that pressure to build up during
      > meditation. Well, hopefully its only the sinus headache feeling
      > more intense as a result of the meditation and nothing else.
      >
      > Slink

      Hi, Slink,

      I find that when I focus too precisely or sternly, that
      such pains are more likely to crop up.

      Try letting your focus become a bit easier and more diffuse.

      Three suggestions:

      1. If you are focusing on your breath by focusing your
      mind's eye on your nose or upper respiratory system,
      then try paying attention instead to how it feels in
      your entire torso as the breath ebbs and flows. Don't
      focus your 'eyes' in that area, allow your attention to
      be more diffuse and based on sensation.

      2. Instead of focusing intently on every single breath,
      give yourself permission to pay attention to every
      third breath or there-abouts. In between the 'third-or-
      so breaths', allow your mind to rest and your bodily
      tensions to relax.

      3. Oftentimes, when we pay attention to our breath,
      we very subtly change it. This can mean that the
      breath moves to a different part of the chest or
      that the length or rhythm of the breath changes.
      I have noticed that if the breath moves to the
      mid to upper part of the chest and becomes more
      shallow, that it is likely to produce head sensations
      such as what you mentioned. Consider paying attention
      to how you may be influencing the breath and see if it
      is possible to 'undo' your 'undoing'; allow your breath
      to emerge in its most innocent expression.

      Good luck, Slink...

      Nina
    • Lord_Slinky@yahoo.com
      Thanks for the suggestions Nina, I ll try them out. I ve been trying to focus on my abdomen, but believe I may also be (involuntarily) focusing my eyes
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 9, 2004
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        Thanks for the suggestions Nina, I'll try them out. I've been trying
        to focus on my abdomen, but believe I may also be (involuntarily)
        focusing my eyes downward toward that region as well.

        Slink

        > Hi, Slink,
        >
        > I find that when I focus too precisely or sternly, that
        > such pains are more likely to crop up.
        >
        > Try letting your focus become a bit easier and more diffuse.
        >
        > Three suggestions:
        >
        > 1. If you are focusing on your breath by focusing your
        > mind's eye on your nose or upper respiratory system,
        > then try paying attention instead to how it feels in
        > your entire torso as the breath ebbs and flows. Don't
        > focus your 'eyes' in that area, allow your attention to
        > be more diffuse and based on sensation.
        >
        > 2. Instead of focusing intently on every single breath,
        > give yourself permission to pay attention to every
        > third breath or there-abouts. In between the 'third-or-
        > so breaths', allow your mind to rest and your bodily
        > tensions to relax.
        >
        > 3. Oftentimes, when we pay attention to our breath,
        > we very subtly change it. This can mean that the
        > breath moves to a different part of the chest or
        > that the length or rhythm of the breath changes.
        > I have noticed that if the breath moves to the
        > mid to upper part of the chest and becomes more
        > shallow, that it is likely to produce head sensations
        > such as what you mentioned. Consider paying attention
        > to how you may be influencing the breath and see if it
        > is possible to 'undo' your 'undoing'; allow your breath
        > to emerge in its most innocent expression.
        >
        > Good luck, Slink...
        >
        > Nina
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