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Re: Meditation newbie question

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  • Lord_Slinky@yahoo.com
    Hi Bob, Thanks for the link, I ll check it out. As for that not right feeling . I ve been suffering from minor sinus headaches off and on for the past year
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 7, 2004
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      Hi Bob,

      Thanks for the link, I'll check it out. As for that "not right
      feeling". I've been suffering from minor sinus headaches off and on
      for the past year (although i don't often take clarinex for it). So
      I take it its not normal for that pressure to build up during
      meditation. Well, hopefully its only the sinus headache feeling
      more intense as a result of the meditation and nothing else.

      Slink


      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com,
      Lord_Slinky@y... wrote:
      > > I've just started practicing a daily routine of meditation (10
      min,
      > > 2 or 3 times a days). I'm just focusing on my breath (and
      counting
      > > it to help maintain focus).
      > > I started a week ago. Anyways, the last two times I've noticed a
      > > buildup of pressure (kind of like a sinus headache) at the front
      > > sides of my head during the meditation. Is this something
      normal,
      > > maybe a signal I'm in the alpha state? Or should this not be
      > > happenning? Is it possible that I already had the headache and
      the
      > > meditation temporarily intensified it?
      > >
      > > Slink
      >
      > Dear Slink,
      > As an RN, I have to suggest that you get yourself checked out by a
      > physician if you experience any physical sensations that
      seem "off",
      > but the real headache we all have is the inner chatterer that
      judges,
      > compares, and comments non-stop about everything. Meditation places
      > you in the position of the Witness to this neverending flow of
      > thoughts, as well as to the everchanging emotions and physical
      > sensations that accompany them, and are taking place 24x7x365. So I
      > suggest persevering non-reactively and silently witnessing what
      flows
      > by. This will be the best educational experience of (literally)
      your
      > life.
      > BTW, I think you have chosen well to focus on your breath. I'm very
      > into breathing and do it every day:-) Seriously, I love breathing
      > techniques. You may want to check out a technique on our web site
      > titled "108, An Easy-Hard Meditation Technique" You'll find it in
      the
      > Archives section. Here's the site's URL
      http://www.meditationsociety.com
      > With this method, you'll be able to track your progress nicely,
      while
      > using counting to keep yourself focused.
      > There is no better thing you can do for your Self then learn and do
      > meditation. I wish you well.
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
    • Nina
      ... on ... So ... Hi, Slink, I find that when I focus too precisely or sternly, that such pains are more likely to crop up. Try letting your focus become a bit
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 7, 2004
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        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, Lord_Slinky@y...
        wrote:
        > Hi Bob,
        >
        > Thanks for the link, I'll check it out. As for that "not right
        > feeling". I've been suffering from minor sinus headaches off and
        on
        > for the past year (although i don't often take clarinex for it).
        So
        > I take it its not normal for that pressure to build up during
        > meditation. Well, hopefully its only the sinus headache feeling
        > more intense as a result of the meditation and nothing else.
        >
        > Slink

        Hi, Slink,

        I find that when I focus too precisely or sternly, that
        such pains are more likely to crop up.

        Try letting your focus become a bit easier and more diffuse.

        Three suggestions:

        1. If you are focusing on your breath by focusing your
        mind's eye on your nose or upper respiratory system,
        then try paying attention instead to how it feels in
        your entire torso as the breath ebbs and flows. Don't
        focus your 'eyes' in that area, allow your attention to
        be more diffuse and based on sensation.

        2. Instead of focusing intently on every single breath,
        give yourself permission to pay attention to every
        third breath or there-abouts. In between the 'third-or-
        so breaths', allow your mind to rest and your bodily
        tensions to relax.

        3. Oftentimes, when we pay attention to our breath,
        we very subtly change it. This can mean that the
        breath moves to a different part of the chest or
        that the length or rhythm of the breath changes.
        I have noticed that if the breath moves to the
        mid to upper part of the chest and becomes more
        shallow, that it is likely to produce head sensations
        such as what you mentioned. Consider paying attention
        to how you may be influencing the breath and see if it
        is possible to 'undo' your 'undoing'; allow your breath
        to emerge in its most innocent expression.

        Good luck, Slink...

        Nina
      • Lord_Slinky@yahoo.com
        Thanks for the suggestions Nina, I ll try them out. I ve been trying to focus on my abdomen, but believe I may also be (involuntarily) focusing my eyes
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 9, 2004
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          Thanks for the suggestions Nina, I'll try them out. I've been trying
          to focus on my abdomen, but believe I may also be (involuntarily)
          focusing my eyes downward toward that region as well.

          Slink

          > Hi, Slink,
          >
          > I find that when I focus too precisely or sternly, that
          > such pains are more likely to crop up.
          >
          > Try letting your focus become a bit easier and more diffuse.
          >
          > Three suggestions:
          >
          > 1. If you are focusing on your breath by focusing your
          > mind's eye on your nose or upper respiratory system,
          > then try paying attention instead to how it feels in
          > your entire torso as the breath ebbs and flows. Don't
          > focus your 'eyes' in that area, allow your attention to
          > be more diffuse and based on sensation.
          >
          > 2. Instead of focusing intently on every single breath,
          > give yourself permission to pay attention to every
          > third breath or there-abouts. In between the 'third-or-
          > so breaths', allow your mind to rest and your bodily
          > tensions to relax.
          >
          > 3. Oftentimes, when we pay attention to our breath,
          > we very subtly change it. This can mean that the
          > breath moves to a different part of the chest or
          > that the length or rhythm of the breath changes.
          > I have noticed that if the breath moves to the
          > mid to upper part of the chest and becomes more
          > shallow, that it is likely to produce head sensations
          > such as what you mentioned. Consider paying attention
          > to how you may be influencing the breath and see if it
          > is possible to 'undo' your 'undoing'; allow your breath
          > to emerge in its most innocent expression.
          >
          > Good luck, Slink...
          >
          > Nina
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