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Re: [Meditation Society of America] Digest Number 1023:knives

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  • Grant Bardsley
    Hey guys, I m a knife and sword buff too! I used to have a good collection and found cleaning and sharpening very soothing and therapeutic. My favourite piece
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 2, 2004
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      Hey guys,

      I'm a knife and sword buff too! I used to have a good collection and found
      cleaning and sharpening very soothing and therapeutic. My favourite piece
      was a WWI bayonet (British). The only knives I have now are cheap (but fun)
      Chinese copies of automatics I get at the market and a nice little Gerber
      utility knife/pocket tool. I sold off the rest of my collection; I liked it
      but it used to freak people out.

      I'm a gun buff too; there are lots of hunters with shotguns here but I'm not
      into that; I have a russian made 28 shot .177 CO2 pistol with laser sight
      called an Anics Skif A3000 for target shooting and reenactments of moments
      from 'Scarface'. Fantastic fun!

      I wonder how many other nondual types on these lists are also weapons
      freaks?

      Grant.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com>
      To: <meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2004 3:41 PM
      Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Digest Number 1023


      >
      > There are 10 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Cramping
      > From: "jodyrrr" <jodyrrr@...>
      > 2. Knives vs Meditation
      > From: medit8ionsociety
      > 3. Re: Knives vs Meditation
      > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
      > 4. Re: Knives vs Meditation
      > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
      > 5. Re: Meditation Society of America Knives vs Meditation
      > From: Gregory Goode <goode@...>
      > 6. Re: Meditation Society of America Knives vs Meditation
      > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
      > 7. Re: More on Pranayama
      > From: "Harold" <adams@...>
      > 8. Re: Knives vs Meditation
      > From: medit8ionsociety
      > 9. Re: Knives vs Meditation
      > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
      > 10. Re: Knives vs Meditation
      > From: "Gene Poole" <gene_poole@...>
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 16:39:58 -0000
      > From: "jodyrrr" <jodyrrr@...>
      > Subject: Cramping
      >
      > I have always been prone to severe leg cramping during
      > strenuous activities. I'm all about backcountry skiing,
      > hiking, mountain biking, etc, and so I've just learned to
      > deal with it (by pounding on my charliehorses when
      > they've occurred.)
      >
      > That is, until this last season when I discovered Sport
      > Legs. This stuff has been nothing less than a miracle
      > for me. It allows me to go twice as long as I was able
      > to before. I can now ski 8 hours, ride 40 miles, hike
      > 20, without the severe cramping I used to endure.
      >
      > http://www.sportlegs.com/about/welcome.asp
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 22:29:54 -0000
      > From: medit8ionsociety
      > Subject: Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
      > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
      > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
      > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or why
      > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I sought
      > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
      > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
      > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
      > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
      > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in knives
      > than in consciousness evolving subjects.
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
      > reasonable prices?:-)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 23:08:04 -0000
      > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
      > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
      > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
      > > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a
      > little
      > > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
      > > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or
      > why
      > > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I
      > sought
      > > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
      > > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
      > > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
      > > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
      > > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in
      > > knives than in consciousness evolving subjects.
      > > Peace and blessings,
      > > Bob
      > > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
      > > reasonable prices?:-)
      >
      > You could say that knives can be consciousness evolving objects.
      >
      > My favorite knife is the swiss army serrated knife I've had for
      > camping and such. It is better than ginsu. I can saw down small
      > trees and then still slice tomatoes. Plus, it fits very nicely
      > in my purse. LOL! I admit that I have thought to have it near
      > as a defense (hehe, how universal is THAT?) a time or two, but
      > luckily have never had to use it in that capacity.
      >
      > Here is a link to an amazing knife store:
      > http://www.eknifeworks.com/webapp/eCommerce/prodlist.jsp?
      > Mode=Text&SearchText=damascus
      > I don't know how reasonable their prices are, but the
      > folks are "real nice" there. They are a little like a museum,
      > with lots of old, old knives on display, as well as knives
      > for sale.
      >
      > Bob, if you think knives are big, you haven't seen the traffic
      > this side of town on the gun show days. Yee haw!
      >
      > Nina
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 4
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 16:40:00 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
      > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > Hi Bob,
      >
      > Knife/blade making is actually a fun hobby, egads for me to say that, but
      it is. There is a craftsman like quality to many blades, which include
      durability, this to it's lasting sharpness, it's stress factor (flexibility)
      and it's over-all girth (thinkness). The girth end is also significant to
      it's balanced use in the hands of humans, which there is throwing thrusting
      and swinging. Anyway, this is the draw, those factors are all about
      adaptability which inculdes the forementioned atributes. The side effect is
      the use of the blades in killing sports which is also best within
      survivalist mode and competitive modes of showmenship. If you take a gander,
      you'll find even larger forums for survialist groups, which includes guns,
      outbacking, home building models, water purifications, gardening, hunting,
      power generation, etc.
      >
      > The point here is, adaptability, health, stamina for the human genome is a
      popular past time. Meditations being just one aspect of this "betterment" of
      the human race even carries, in some social circles, a showmenship quality
      in what can be done with the body in the frame of the tuned in mind
      (firewalking, endurance, extreme temperature viability and even abstract
      skills of esp). Meditation is one of the greatest forms of sharpening the
      minds skill, yet often overlooked since it doesn't carry that object quality
      in the way that all the externals mentioned do. Of course unlike making
      blades, mediation takes even more time and personal energies to manifest
      even the slightest advantages.
      >
      > Object dependencies are extremely high at this stage, who knows for sure
      what the future might bring?
      >
      > Peace and Love
      >
      > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
      > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
      > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
      > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
      > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or why
      > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I sought
      > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
      > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
      > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
      > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
      > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in knives
      > than in consciousness evolving subjects.
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
      > reasonable prices?:-)
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/meditationsocietyofamerica/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > meditationsocietyofamerica-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
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      >
      > [This message contained attachments]
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 5
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 20:23:33 -0400
      > From: Gregory Goode <goode@...>
      > Subject: Re: Meditation Society of America Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > I'm a knife buff too! Although I don't make knives, I use and appreciate
      good ones. I like Chris Reeves, Benchmade autos, and balisongs. Knives are
      easy, meditation is hard.
      >
      > --Greg
      >
      > On 6/28/04 07:40 pm Jason Fishman (munkiman4u@...) wrote:
      > Hi Bob,
      >
      > Knife/blade making is actually a fun hobby, egads for me to say that, but
      it is. There is a craftsman like quality to many blades, which include
      durability, this to it's lasting sharpness, it's stress factor (flexibility)
      and it's over-all girth (thinkness). The girth end is also significant to
      it's balanced use in the hands of humans, which there is throwing thrusting
      and swinging. Anyway, this is the draw, those factors are all about
      adaptability which inculdes the forementioned atributes. The side effect is
      the use of the blades in killing sports which is also best within
      survivalist mode and competitive modes of showmenship. If you take a gander,
      you'll find even larger forums for survialist groups, which includes guns,
      outbacking, home building models, water purifications, gardening, hunting,
      power generation, etc.
      >
      > The point here is, adaptability, health, stamina for the human genome is a
      popular past time. Meditations being just one aspect of this "betterment" of
      the human race even carries, in some social circles, a showmenship quality
      in what can be done with the body in the frame of the tuned in mind
      (firewalking, endurance, extreme temperature viability and even abstract
      skills of esp). Meditation is one of the greatest forms of sharpening the
      minds skill, yet often overlooked since it doesn't carry that object quality
      in the way that all the externals mentioned do. Of course unlike making
      blades, mediation takes even more time and personal energies to manifest
      even the slightest advantages.
      >
      > Object dependencies are extremely high at this stage, who knows for sure
      what the future might bring?
      >
      > Peace and Love
      >
      > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
      > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
      > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
      > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
      > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or why
      > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I sought
      > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
      > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
      > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
      > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
      > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in knives
      > than in consciousness evolving subjects.
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
      > reasonable prices?:-)
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/meditationsocietyofamerica/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > meditationsocietyofamerica-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage!
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 6
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 17:55:10 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
      > Subject: Re: Meditation Society of America Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > Well I wouldn't go as far to say I'm a buff. I do know a little about
      knife making since many of my family and some casual friends are or were
      into making them. I do have a few, besides the standard kitchen variety, but
      those are the hand crafted kind and one swiss army version (like the one
      Nina mentioned). My son is into swords right now (via the hugely popular
      japanimation cartoons and video games) so I have been looking into
      collecting a few, big bucks though, for me anyway. I'm still more of a mind
      guy, that seems to be the most versitile tool out of them all!
      >
      > Peace and Love
      >
      > Gregory Goode <goode@...> wrote:
      > I'm a knife buff too! Although I don't make knives, I use and appreciate
      good ones. I like Chris Reeves, Benchmade autos, and balisongs. Knives are
      easy, meditation is hard.
      >
      > --Greg
      >
      > On 6/28/04 07:40 pm Jason Fishman (munkiman4u@...) wrote:
      > Hi Bob,
      >
      > Knife/blade making is actually a fun hobby, egads for me to say that, but
      it is. There is a craftsman like quality to many blades, which include
      durability, this to it's lasting sharpness, it's stress factor (flexibility)
      and it's over-all girth (thinkness). The girth end is also significant to
      it's balanced use in the hands of humans, which there is throwing thrusting
      and swinging. Anyway, this is the draw, those factors are all about
      adaptability which inculdes the forementioned atributes. The side effect is
      the use of the blades in killing sports which is also best within
      survivalist mode and competitive modes of showmenship. If you take a gander,
      you'll find even larger forums for survialist groups, which includes guns,
      outbacking, home building models, water purifications, gardening, hunting,
      power generation, etc.
      >
      > The point here is, adaptability, health, stamina for the human genome is a
      popular past time. Meditations being just one aspect of this "betterment" of
      the human race even carries, in some social circles, a showmenship quality
      in what can be done with the body in the frame of the tuned in mind
      (firewalking, endurance, extreme temperature viability and even abstract
      skills of esp). Meditation is one of the greatest forms of sharpening the
      minds skill, yet often overlooked since it doesn't carry that object quality
      in the way that all the externals mentioned do. Of course unlike making
      blades, mediation takes even more time and personal energies to manifest
      even the slightest advantages.
      >
      > Object dependencies are extremely high at this stage, who knows for sure
      what the future might bring?
      >
      > Peace and Love
      >
      > medit8ionsociety wrote:
      > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
      > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
      > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
      > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or why
      > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I sought
      > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
      > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
      > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
      > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
      > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in knives
      > than in consciousness evolving subjects.
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
      > reasonable prices?:-)
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/meditationsocietyofamerica/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > meditationsocietyofamerica-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage!
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage!
      >
      > [This message contained attachments]
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 7
      > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 17:48:20 -0600
      > From: "Harold" <adams@...>
      > Subject: Re: More on Pranayama
      >
      >
      >
      > >>>>virtually no other practice positions one more perfectly to be the
      > Witness to one's life as it takes place>>
      >
      > Hi all, The above speaks highly of pranayama practices and suggests
      a
      > one size fits all solution to worldly woes and answers the mystery of
      life.
      > I have been involved with pranayama practice for some time and i do not
      > doubt the capabilities of pranayama, but feel the outcome rests more on
      > one's "initial" motives concerning the practice than it does on
      pranayama's
      > ability to purify motives. Although truth encourages more truth, on an
      > individual basis what is revealed in breath has more to do with what one
      > want's revealed as opposed to what is necessarially available. Truth
      > encourages more of the same, but only in like porportion, to wit, the
      > sincerity one brings to the practice to begin with. Sometimes an
      unconscious
      > well intentioned rationalization can be confused with sincerity. In that
      > sense the below is only half true.
      >
      > >> The practice of pranayama is a question of awareness, attention, and
      > intention far more than questions and mental chatter about benefits or
      > dangers, or teachers, or right or wrong ways to do it.>>
      >
      > Hal
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > > With every inhalation, the universe fills us will love, healing,
      > > wisdom and bliss. This is retained and sent to every cell in our body.
      > > The universe then receives it back with an exhalation, along with
      > > impurities that we needed to get rid of. This cycle is repeated and
      > > repeated until the need to replace the vehicle arrives. There is
      > > little danger in being aware of this process, and doing what we can to
      > > allow its unblocked flow. There is a far greater danger in being
      > > unaware of this life-long cycling. Raja yoga lets us become aware of
      > > the things that impede the process mentally, Hatha yoga lets us
      > > understand this physically. Bhakti yoga lets us awaken to it
      > > emotionally. Karma yoga brings awareness actively. And Jhana yoga
      > > dissolves all restrictions through enquiry. It is often said that only
      > > Raja and Hatha yoga use pranayama techniques, and in a specific way,
      > > that is so. But in reality all yogis, all people, including those who
      > > make no so-called spiritual efforts at all, do pranayama every moment.
      > > And as pranayama takes place in the moment, and we go from the shore
      > > of birth to the shore of death, .
      > > Ignoring the
      > > Jhana/Vedanta/Advaita/etc-like reality/concept that there is no
      > > "me/you/others/doing/etc", and to refer back to the analogy of life
      > > being a going from one shore to the other; when you are in a boat, it is
      > far better to look where you are, and where you are going, if you want to
      > get to your destination without running into a hazard while at sea. And
      > pranayama is an ancient and proven methodology to help this trip go well.
      > > Peace and blessings,
      > > Bob
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      > > ADVERTISEMENT
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > ------
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/meditationsocietyofamerica/
      > >
      > > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > meditationsocietyofamerica-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > >
      > > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
      Service.
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 8
      > Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 02:07:47 -0000
      > From: medit8ionsociety
      > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Nina"
      > <murrkis@y...> wrote:
      > snip
      > > You could say that knives can be consciousness evolving objects.
      > >
      > > My favorite knife is the swiss army serrated knife I've had for
      > > camping and such. It is better than ginsu. I can saw down small
      > > trees and then still slice tomatoes. Plus, it fits very nicely
      > > in my purse. LOL! I admit that I have thought to have it near
      > > as a defense (hehe, how universal is THAT?) a time or two, but
      > > luckily have never had to use it in that capacity.
      > >
      > > Here is a link to an amazing knife store:
      > > http://www.eknifeworks.com/webapp/eCommerce/prodlist.jsp?
      > > Mode=Text&SearchText=damascus
      > > I don't know how reasonable their prices are, but the
      > > folks are "real nice" there. They are a little like a museum,
      > > with lots of old, old knives on display, as well as knives
      > > for sale.
      > >
      > > Bob, if you think knives are big, you haven't seen the traffic
      > > this side of town on the gun show days. Yee haw!
      > >
      > > Nina
      >
      > Dear Ninaji,
      > This is another of those "My, what a small universe this is" type
      > things! I carried a swiss army knife with the amazingly effective
      > serrated knife and used it virtually every day for 20+ years. Then,
      > when my son was about to get married, I went looking for a good father
      > to son gift for him. And naturally, I decided on giving him a
      > concealed deadly weapon:-) This led me to the same Smokey Mountain
      > knife company (and who, as you pointed out, now does have an excellent
      > web-site http://www.eknifeworks.com ) that you kindly recommended. And
      > you are so right! There are really nice people. I had found Dan a
      > great turquoise knife and soon after I gave it to him, I realized that
      > I'd like one for myself, because of it's beauty and quality
      > construction, and as a keepsake of him (he lives in Arkansas, and me
      > in the Philly area). So I called the Smokey people and found out that
      > they had sold out of them. But over the course of the next 1 1/2
      > years, they kept supplying me with leads of stores and people who may
      > have them. And I did eventually find one, and have carried it ever
      > since as the replacement to my swiss army knife (which I still do
      > carry in my nursing equipment bag). I guess it was this search that
      > first made me aware of knives and to begin appreciating "Man's first
      > tool" on a different level. And now I know first hand what Gregji sees
      > in the Chris Reeves, Benchmade autos, and balisongs knives he is
      > interested in, and the understanding Sri Jason has of the craftmanship
      > involved in their making. Similarly, since seeing Kill Bill 1 this
      > weekend, I can see why Jason's son is into swords, and that the
      > quality of sword construction it demonstrated verified in a way the
      > supposition that "knives can be consciousness evolving objects".
      > Peace and blessings,
      > Bob
      > PS: Seeing the popularity and political power of the NRA, I have no
      > doubt that gun shows have an enormous and enthusiastic turnout.
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 9
      > Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 03:43:07 -0000
      > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
      > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > Wow, Bob, I hadn't realized how enduringly helpful
      > as well as friendly those Smokey Mountain knife shop
      > folks are! The website is great, but you don't get
      > the full effect unless you visit their store in
      > person. It is a slice of the Smokey Mountains, a la
      > Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg - not quite as over-the-top,
      > mind you. Big heavy timbered stuff... and probably a
      > chainsaw carving of a bear or two. Knives are nice with
      > a little kitsch, you know... Lest you think it is all
      > about knives, they also have quite an array of kitchen
      > gadgets and "stuff"... something like a general store
      > on steroids. Jam-packed full-o-stuff with something of
      > a carnival atmosphere. My parents live within a longish
      > driving distance of the store and it is where we went to
      > find some wood carving knives for my dad.
      >
      > Nice story, btw.
      >
      > Nina
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 10
      > Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 04:29:26 -0000
      > From: "Gene Poole" <gene_poole@...>
      > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
      >
      > >medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      >
      > > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
      > > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
      > > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
      > > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or why
      > > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I sought
      > > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
      > > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
      > > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
      > > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
      > > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in knives
      > > than in consciousness evolving subjects.
      > > Peace and blessings,
      > > Bob
      > > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
      > > reasonable prices?:-)
      >
      > Spiritually oriented groups disdain
      > cutting remarks; and everyone wants
      > to be on the cutting edge.
      >
      > A good knife used well, never loses its temper.
      >
      > Participating in spiritual groups, can be
      > a test of one's mettle.
      >
      > A private or smallish smithy/forging
      > company can produce damascus steel
      > for you. You can even learn how to
      > design the billets, to render into the
      > very patterns you desire.
      >
      > If you really get into it, you can buy/make
      > your own forge setup, including a nifty
      > automatic 'pounder', and stationary
      > metal-cutting bandsaw, so that you can
      > design and produce your own billets of
      > damascus. You can fold them as much as
      > you want.
      >
      > I find metal-working, especially forge
      > work, to be a fine 'meditation'.
      >
      >
      > ==Gene Poole==
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
      >
    • Jason Fishman
      Hey Grant, What a great effort to address all the messages/posters. I ve never been a buff or a big time knower of types and names of weapons. I m not a big
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hey Grant,

        What a great effort to address all the messages/posters.

        I've never been a buff or a big time knower of types and names of weapons. I'm not a big gun fan
        in general for the simple fact that I just don't need a gun these days (via hunting or sharp
        shooting) and really don't want the responsability to keep them out of the hands of the kids,
        especially when they feel they want to impress thier friends. I know there are ways to do this and
        teach them they shouldn't be pulling out weapons to show off, but that would be the only reason I
        would have a gun collection (to show them off). It's just too dangerous to have them around, even
        when properly trained in the use. Not that I'm against gun ownership, especially when people are
        smart about using them, but here in Ohio they just passed a law that gives gun owners rights to
        carry them concealed and there are just alot of angery people out there.

        Anywho, I'm glad to hear you actually enjoy the gun and shooting. I've been to the range with
        friends and had a great time firing off rounds too! Funny how I just don't have any motivation
        for that kind of stress relief stuff anymore.

        Peace and Love


        --- Grant Bardsley <bardsley@...> wrote:
        > Hey guys,
        >
        > I'm a knife and sword buff too! I used to have a good collection and found
        > cleaning and sharpening very soothing and therapeutic. My favourite piece
        > was a WWI bayonet (British). The only knives I have now are cheap (but fun)
        > Chinese copies of automatics I get at the market and a nice little Gerber
        > utility knife/pocket tool. I sold off the rest of my collection; I liked it
        > but it used to freak people out.
        >
        > I'm a gun buff too; there are lots of hunters with shotguns here but I'm not
        > into that; I have a russian made 28 shot .177 CO2 pistol with laser sight
        > called an Anics Skif A3000 for target shooting and reenactments of moments
        > from 'Scarface'. Fantastic fun!
        >
        > I wonder how many other nondual types on these lists are also weapons
        > freaks?
        >
        > Grant.
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: <meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com>
        > To: <meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2004 3:41 PM
        > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Digest Number 1023
        >
        >
        > >
        > > There are 10 messages in this issue.
        > >
        > > Topics in this digest:
        > >
        > > 1. Cramping
        > > From: "jodyrrr" <jodyrrr@...>
        > > 2. Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: medit8ionsociety
        > > 3. Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
        > > 4. Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
        > > 5. Re: Meditation Society of America Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: Gregory Goode <goode@...>
        > > 6. Re: Meditation Society of America Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
        > > 7. Re: More on Pranayama
        > > From: "Harold" <adams@...>
        > > 8. Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: medit8ionsociety
        > > 9. Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
        > > 10. Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > > From: "Gene Poole" <gene_poole@...>
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > >
        > > Message: 1
        > > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 16:39:58 -0000
        > > From: "jodyrrr" <jodyrrr@...>
        > > Subject: Cramping
        > >
        > > I have always been prone to severe leg cramping during
        > > strenuous activities. I'm all about backcountry skiing,
        > > hiking, mountain biking, etc, and so I've just learned to
        > > deal with it (by pounding on my charliehorses when
        > > they've occurred.)
        > >
        > > That is, until this last season when I discovered Sport
        > > Legs. This stuff has been nothing less than a miracle
        > > for me. It allows me to go twice as long as I was able
        > > to before. I can now ski 8 hours, ride 40 miles, hike
        > > 20, without the severe cramping I used to endure.
        > >
        > > http://www.sportlegs.com/about/welcome.asp
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > >
        > > Message: 2
        > > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 22:29:54 -0000
        > > From: medit8ionsociety
        > > Subject: Knives vs Meditation
        > >
        > > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
        > > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
        > > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
        > > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or why
        > > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I sought
        > > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
        > > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
        > > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
        > > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
        > > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in knives
        > > than in consciousness evolving subjects.
        > > Peace and blessings,
        > > Bob
        > > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
        > > reasonable prices?:-)
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > >
        > > Message: 3
        > > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 23:08:04 -0000
        > > From: "Nina" <murrkis@...>
        > > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > >
        > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
        > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > > > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
        > > > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a
        > > little
        > > > over double this. I recently became interested in collecting and
        > > > learning how to make knives. I couldn't possibly tell you where or
        > > why
        > > > this yen came into my consciousness, but there it was, and so I
        > > sought
        > > > out information on the web about this (what I thought was) somewhat
        > > > esoteric hobby/calling/material desire/whatever. Well, it turns out
        > > > that one group I belong to has 24,000 members, another 16,000, and
        > > > another 15,000. So, I guess what I'm wondering is what the
        > > > significance of there being such a greater apparent interest in
        > > > knives than in consciousness evolving subjects.
        > > > Peace and blessings,
        > > > Bob
        > > > PS: Anybody know where I can get some good damascus blades at
        > > > reasonable prices?:-)
        > >
        > > You could say that knives can be consciousness evolving objects.
        > >
        > > My favorite knife is the swiss army serrated knife I've had for
        > > camping and such. It is better than ginsu. I can saw down small
        > > trees and then still slice tomatoes. Plus, it fits very nicely
        > > in my purse. LOL! I admit that I have thought to have it near
        > > as a defense (hehe, how universal is THAT?) a time or two, but
        > > luckily have never had to use it in that capacity.
        > >
        > > Here is a link to an amazing knife store:
        > > http://www.eknifeworks.com/webapp/eCommerce/prodlist.jsp?
        > > Mode=Text&SearchText=damascus
        > > I don't know how reasonable their prices are, but the
        > > folks are "real nice" there. They are a little like a museum,
        > > with lots of old, old knives on display, as well as knives
        > > for sale.
        > >
        > > Bob, if you think knives are big, you haven't seen the traffic
        > > this side of town on the gun show days. Yee haw!
        > >
        > > Nina
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        > >
        > > Message: 4
        > > Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 16:40:00 -0700 (PDT)
        > > From: Jason Fishman <munkiman4u@...>
        > > Subject: Re: Knives vs Meditation
        > >
        > > Hi Bob,
        > >
        > > Knife/blade making is actually a fun hobby, egads for me to say that, but
        > it is. There is a craftsman like quality to many blades, which include
        > durability, this to it's lasting sharpness, it's stress factor (flexibility)
        > and it's over-all girth (thinkness). The girth end is also significant to
        > it's balanced use in the hands of humans, which there is throwing thrusting
        > and swinging. Anyway, this is the draw, those factors are all about
        > adaptability which inculdes the forementioned atributes. The side effect is
        > the use of the blades in killing sports which is also best within
        > survivalist mode and competitive modes of showmenship. If you take a gander,
        > you'll find even larger forums for survialist groups, which includes guns,
        > outbacking, home building models, water purifications, gardening, hunting,
        > power generation, etc.
        > >
        > > The point here is, adaptability, health, stamina for the human genome is a
        > popular past time. Meditations being just one aspect of this "betterment" of
        > the human race even carries, in some social circles, a showmenship quality
        > in what can be done with the body in the frame of the tuned in mind
        > (firewalking, endurance, extreme temperature viability and even abstract
        > skills of esp). Meditation is one of the greatest forms of sharpening the
        > minds skill, yet often overlooked since it doesn't carry that object quality
        > in the way that all the externals mentioned do. Of course unlike making
        > blades, mediation takes even more time and personal energies to manifest
        > even the slightest advantages.
        > >
        > > Object dependencies are extremely high at this stage, who knows for sure
        > what the future might bring?
        > >
        > > Peace and Love
        > >
        > > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        > > We now have about 375 members, and our sister/brother
        > > meditation/nonduality/enlightenment/etc sites have as many as a little
        >
        === message truncated ===





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