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Re: Mullah Nasrudin and the Scholars

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  • medit8ionsociety
    ... years, ... group, ... getting ... unbearable. ... (and ... foxhole, ... Yo Andy, Good to hear/read from you. From Sandeep s post and from your words, I m
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 6, 2004
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Andy"
      <endofthedream@y...> wrote:
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
      > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > *****Yes, life is a fatal "disease."
      >
      > Sometimes I ask my students "What is a sexually-transmitted
      > condition, with a 100% fatality rate?" Prior to the last few
      years,
      > most responded with an answer of "AIDS," but since the cocktails
      > seem to be indefinitely prolonging AIDS victims' lives (for those
      > that have the money or insurance to afford them; the biggest
      group,
      > in Africa, clearly don't). That answer doesn't work too well any
      > longer.
      >
      >
      >
      > Once the Mulla was invited to dinner by a group of scholars. When he
      > arrived, he found the other guests in a heated debate concerning
      > destiny vs. free will.
      >
      > As time went by and the argument seemed endless, the Mulla was
      getting
      > hungrier by the minute; The aroma from the kitchen became
      unbearable.
      >
      > Nasrudin stood up and said "If I prove beyond a shadow of doubt that
      > man is predestined, can we then begin our dinner?"
      >
      >
      > *****What about woman? Does she escape predestination? :-))))
      >
      > At this, the rest fell silent.
      >
      > The Mulla then said "I can say, with absolute certainty, that every
      > man present here today is predestined to die."
      >
      > Dinner was promptly served.
      >
      >
      > *****Ahhh but was it enjoyed post the message? :-)))
      > Take it from one who is currently "on the edge," all this babbling
      > about meditation, spirituality, awakening, etc. is all cerebral
      (and
      > will get you just so far) until one comes face-to-face (in a
      foxhole,
      > a burning building, a cancer ward) with the thought and direct
      > experience of mortality. *That's* where the rubber meets the road!
      >
      > ~andy (back for a brief visit)

      Yo Andy,

      Good to hear/read from you. From Sandeep's post and from your words,
      I'm going to assume that you are now taking the masters level "Facts
      of Life 101" course, as well as sharing your right on the spiritual
      money wisdom with your students.

      One thing I see that has come to my mind from this is the rabbit in
      Alice in Wonderland (I think he was the one), who would say, while
      scurrying around to keep such important appointments as the tea party
      with the mad hatter, "So much to do, and so little time". Way too
      busy to realize that it's actually "So much time, and nothing to do".

      And like Nasrudin in this tale, trying to awaken "scholars" to the
      opportunity to live their life while they have it to live, I also
      think of Gurdjieff, who at the end of his 1200+ page masterwork, All
      and Everything, sums it all up by commenting, that the most
      astonishing thing about humans is that they have no conception of, or
      appreciation for the fact that they are mortal.

      And yes, as you point to, "on the edge" events can certainly be eye
      openers, and potentially end the "They have eyes but don't see"
      syndrome. But, my oh my, they can be quite a trip! So as we go
      through the inevitable rocks and rolls on our journey, it becomes a
      real joy to bump into uplifting words, concepts, and things, and I
      certainly consider what you share as such, so I hope your visit here
      will not be just a brief one. And of course, I hope you are well and
      feeling swell.

      Peace and blessings,
      Bob
    • Andy
      ... medit8ionsociety Yo Andy, Good to hear/read from you. From Sandeep s post and from your words, I m going to assume that you are now taking the masters
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 7, 2004
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        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Andy"
        > <endofthedream@y...> wrote:
        > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com,
        medit8ionsociety


        Yo Andy,

        Good to hear/read from you. From Sandeep's post and from your words,
        I'm going to assume that you are now taking the masters level "Facts
        of Life 101" course, as well as sharing your right on the spiritual
        money wisdom with your students.


        *****No, I'm not teaching this semester. Dealing with a particularly
        stubbon bout of recurrent cancer, one that requires a more aggressive
        treatment (stem-cell transplant, a 4 week hospital stay, and more fun
        than you can shake a stick at! Hahaha!!!). But yes, when I do return
        to work later this fall (hopefully with some hair intact!), I do plan
        on starting up the spiritual inquiry/meditation group that we talked
        about last fall.


        One thing I see that has come to my mind from this is the rabbit in
        Alice in Wonderland (I think he was the one), who would say, while
        scurrying around to keep such important appointments as the tea party
        with the mad hatter, "So much to do, and so little time". Way too
        busy to realize that it's actually "So much time, and nothing to do".


        *****Yes, there is nothing to do, and yet things apparently get
        done. In the matter of time, three words: it is not. ;-)



        And like Nasrudin in this tale, trying to awaken "scholars" to the
        opportunity to live their life while they have it to live, I also
        think of Gurdjieff, who at the end of his 1200+ page masterwork, All
        and Everything, sums it all up by commenting, that the most
        astonishing thing about humans is that they have no conception of, or
        appreciation for the fact that they are mortal.


        *****Until such appreciation manifests itself in their lives. Either
        at the moment of the body's cessation or, perhaps, earlier, in a
        cancer ward. Either way, it's a grand trip! :-)))))


        And yes, as you point to, "on the edge" events can certainly be eye
        openers, and potentially end the "They have eyes but don't see"
        syndrome. But, my oh my, they can be quite a trip! So as we go
        through the inevitable rocks and rolls on our journey, it becomes a
        real joy to bump into uplifting words, concepts, and things, and I
        certainly consider what you share as such, so I hope your visit here
        will not be just a brief one. And of course, I hope you are well and
        feeling swell.


        *****Remember from the original Star Trek, the Vulcan IDIC? Infinite
        Divisity in Infinite Combination. So are all the uplifting words,
        concepts, and things. What moves Andy, bores Bob, upsets Joan, and
        enrages Father Marshall.

        Thought tells us that to be "safe," we each much think and believe
        alike. I don't know if it is possible, but in the course of human
        history, it hasn't happened ever. It takes something more to
        transcend this drive for safety, some sense of security in what is
        perceived not through thought but beyond thought. And sometimes
        meditation is a useful tool to provoke such seeing. But it is not
        essential. Nothing is. As the late, great runner-philosopher-
        cardiologist George Sheehan repeatedly wrote, "We must all be an
        experiment of one."

        Peace and blessings,
        Bob

        *****Thank you. Hugs!
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