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[Meditation Society of America] Re: Dealing With Life Meditations/Eglaelin

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  • jodyrrr
    ... I don t know Andy. As an individual, it s hard not to see the tragedy inherent in most of the obsessive seeking that goes on, especially when it s
    Message 1 of 123 , Nov 30, 2003
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Andy" <endofthedream@y...>
      wrote:
      > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "jodyrrr"
      > <jodyrrr@y...> wrote:
      > > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Eglaelin"
      > <eglaelin@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > >
      > > [snip]
      > >
      > > > It is a common tendency for those involved in religions to use
      > > > the phrase don't think.
      > > >
      > > > Peace On Your Path,
      > > > Eglaelin
      > >
      > > Sadly, it is a common tendency of those who think to miss what
      > > they are seeking entirely in the cacophany of speculation generated
      > > by their thinking.
      >
      >
      > *****Jody, how about dropping the "sadly"?
      >
      > What is true for me is that it is not "sad." It is how it is.
      >
      > The "missing" you allude to is actually part of the game. Some miss
      > it, some don't. The game entails all aspects of phenomenality: the
      > good the bad and the ugly. ;-)
      >
      > It is only the stories we tell ourselves about "how" things "should"
      > be that create the sadness. Drop the stories, there is no sadness.
      > There is "As It IS," and only that.
      >
      > Hugs!

      I don't know Andy. As an individual, it's hard not to see the
      tragedy inherent in most of the obsessive seeking that goes on,
      especially when it's combined and reinforced by a rigid adherence
      to whichever ideology has been accepted as the truth outside
      of experiential understanding.

      For instance, the Vedanta Society in America is full of pruny old
      men and woman who have read Ramakrishna and Vivekananda
      with an uncritical eye and have been assisted by uncritical swamis.
      These folk have been led to believe that if they suspend their
      sex lives they will eventually come to see themselves as they
      really are. These folk all live in the expectation that understanding
      will arrive as the result of continence. I find this to be utterly
      tragic and sad, as they have sacrificed a good deal of their
      comfort in this world for nothing.

      Not that it wouldn't have been worth it if it actually worked like
      this, but that sex has absolutely nothing to do with who we
      really are. Stopping sex does not necessarily affect us knowing
      who we are, but the expectation that ending sex guarantees the
      establishment of understanding actually can prevent understanding
      from arising in a life.

      It's like the eggs of the cowbird.

      The cowbird had developed an interesting reproduction strategy.
      The female finds the nest of another local species of bird and
      removes that bird's eggs, layer hers in their place.

      Then she simply takes off and lets the other bird raise her
      young.

      Expectations about understanding are like the cowbird's eggs.
      Thoughts and ideas about understanding serve to take the
      place of the *actual* understanding that is sought.

      How can we know ourselves as we've *always* known ourselves
      if our heads are full of ideas about what we *think* we know
      about ourselves. The understanding that is sought is *always*
      available, but the *ideas* about what this understanding *is* easily
      replace the actual recognition of this understanding as it exists
      in us.

      It's always right there, front and center, but we cannot see it
      behind all the ideas we might have about it. Like looking for
      a pair of glasses we left on our head, we keep looking harder
      and harder everywhere *but* our head. When we are blessed
      enough to finally see that we had our glasses the whole time
      we were looking for them, only then can we see that the
      whole process of looking for them and expecting them to
      be something we had imagined had actually been the causes
      of not seeing them in the first place.

      To me, there is something utterly tragic in this, and most all
      the other aspects of spiritual culture, a great deal of which
      serves to occlude the truth rather than reveal it in my opinion.

      --jody.
    • devi@pacific.net
      ... Patanjali. ... formed. ... devi: i have it on order from the library, i ve already read about four or five commentaries, most from indian scholors, i m
      Message 123 of 123 , Dec 17, 2003
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        > If you like the study of the mind, Eglaelin, You might try Georg
        > Feuerstein's translation and commentary on "Yoga Sutra" by
        Patanjali.
        > It is the basis of Raja Yoga. It is very systematic and well
        formed.
        >
        > Love,
        > Bobby G.

        devi: i have it on order from the library, i've already read about
        four or five commentaries, most from indian scholors, i'm actually
        thinking about offering study groups in my area..
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