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psychology

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  • richmc2003
    What about psychotherapy? How can this be thrown into the mix? Has the human species stumbled upon something new and revolutionary to speed the quest for
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 3, 2003
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      What about psychotherapy? How can this be thrown into the mix? Has
      the human species stumbled upon something new and revolutionary to
      speed the quest for enlightenment? Before the advent of western
      science, the spiritual community had never seen anything like formal,
      structured therapy. Until then, becoming part of the spiritual
      community had been largely a function of karma and privilage. If you
      were lucky enough and if your karma was good enough to be born with
      good mental stability and you just so happened to find an enlightened
      teacher and be accepted under his wing, then this was a large factor
      in how much progress you could make in one lifetime. But now a new
      force has appeared, a new voice has joined the fugue, which promises
      to revolutionize the entire spiritual quest and render it more
      egalitarian, if the professionals could only get their s**t together.
      The Eastern world has offered much in the line of knowledge of
      spiritual phenomena, but I think the Western world has offered the
      scientific method, which is no less significant. Whereas
      eastern spiritual types once practiced elaborate rituals to achieve
      altered states of consciousness, western types have correctly named as
      "hypnotism". What was once called "divine forces within" is now
      called the "subconscious mind". The great triumph us western science
      in terms of spiritual practice, I believe, is the field of psychology
      (at least theoretically). Psychology has succeeded in naming and
      labelling phenomena which once only belonged to the realm of the
      mysterious and mystical. If we could only figure out how to combine
      these two worlds...the implications are staggering. A big debate in
      medieval China was over the question of instant enlightenment versus
      gradual enlightenment. My answer to this dilemna is "yes and no and
      both". You see, I believe that if I could only get all my ducks in a
      row, then I could, theoretically, become enlightened in a flash. The
      chances, however, of getting all my ducks in a row are slim to none.
      Thus, the incredibly long time it takes to become enlightened.
      Enlightenment turns out to be a product of karma and many incarnations
      of trial and error, and a bit of sheer luck. But ENTER THE
      PSYCHOTHERAPIST... I believe that if I could dig down into my
      subconscious mind and remove all traces of mental problems and
      negative beliefs right now, then I could be enlightened right now.
      Psychotherapy promises to streamline a process which once required ten
      eons of staring at a wall meditating and hoping for your mental
      problems to just "sort themselves out". This is what psychology
      promises, but delivery is another matter altogether. I think
      psychology is still in its infancy phase and has a long way to go
      before it can actually deliver these promises. If you just look at
      the large population of mental hospitals, it would seem as if
      psychology is a miserable failure. "Nice try, but no cigar". But we
      may very well get there someday. What we need is more competent
      researchers to enter into the field. Maybe one day psychiatrists will
      actually be the miracle workers that some people seem to think they
      are. Then there will be no functional difference between psychologist
      and sage.
    • Era
      hi Rich, this sounds different please elaborate. ... Karta
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 3, 2003
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        hi Rich,

        this sounds different

        please elaborate.


        > The Eastern world has offered much in the line of knowledge of
        > spiritual phenomena, but I think the Western world has offered the
        > scientific method, which is no less significant. Whereas
        > eastern spiritual types once practiced elaborate rituals to achieve
        > altered states of consciousness, western types have correctly named as
        > "hypnotism". What was once called "divine forces within" is now
        > called the "subconscious mind". The great triumph us western science
        > in terms of spiritual practice, I believe, is the field of psychology
        > (at least theoretically). Psychology has succeeded in naming and
        > labelling phenomena which once only belonged to the realm of the
        > mysterious and mystical. If we could only figure out how to combine
        > these two worlds...the implications are staggering.


        Karta
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