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Re: Meditation and Pain Thesis Help Requested

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  • Gene Poole
    ... Hello Arthur... I wish you success with your study. Pain is generally synonymous with _contraction_. Pain-relieving drugs (opiates, etc) counteract
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 22, 2003
      > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:

      > Greetings!
      >
      > I am Arthur Lui, I am a psychology student of the
      > University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. I have
      > been into meditation for a few years already. I just
      > know basic meditation.
      >
      > I am currently working on my undergraduate thesis
      > which deals with meditation on pain alleviation among
      > adolescent cancer patients here in manila.
      >
      > Would your society be able to give me some pointers /
      > suggestions / facts about my study?
      >
      > Thank you very much.
      >
      > Yours,
      >
      > Arthur Lui

      Hello Arthur...

      I wish you success with your study.

      Pain is generally synonymous with _contraction_.

      Pain-relieving drugs (opiates, etc) counteract
      contraction by producing the opposite effect,
      which is termed 'dilation'.

      Meditation is 'prescribed' in order to produce
      'dilation' of consciousness. While we understand
      that this is roughly a metaphorical description,
      meditation does result in _expansion_.

      Now we must carefully compare the concepts
      of dilation and expansion.

      An object which grows (expands) in size is not
      necessarily in a state of dilation. But a passage-
      way which grows in size (the space of the passage=
      way expands) is said to be dilating.

      We have seen use of language which uses those
      terms interchangeably, while they are clearly not
      interchangeable.

      We generally do not want pain to expand or grow;
      nor do we want it to dilate, whatever that might
      mean.

      We do want awareness to dilate, and this is what
      certain analgesics can do. It seems that meditation
      can also lead to dilation of awareness.

      One way to look at dilation of awareness is to
      is to compare the effects of a spotlight to that
      of a floodlight. The spotlight is contracted,
      compared to the floodlight.

      Pain reduces (constricts) awareness to a 'point',
      similar to a spotlight. And that is literally the
      'point' of pain. It draws attention.

      Diffusion/dilation of awareness encompasses
      a large area, in which is found the point of pain.
      On average, there is more non-pain area in awareness
      than pain area. On average, pain is perceived as being
      less than before dilation of awareness.

      Understand that this is not a matter of distraction
      from pain, but rather, gathering a very large context
      in which pain is a minority in awareness.

      The well-known 'expansive' effects of meditation
      may therefore be better stated as 'dilation':

      [dilation n : the act of expanding an aperture; "the dilation of the pupil of the eye"]

      The pupil of the eye dilates not only when an
      object of pleasure or desire is seen, but also when
      opiates are at work in the blood.

      You may be looking for a "common gateway"; IE,
      what it is that meditation, pleasure/love and
      opiates have in common; or more to the point,
      how to exploit that gateway by purely meditative
      means.

      'Meditations' which can be measured to produce
      endorphins is one clue.

      The metaphor of 'aperture' is useful in this search;
      to be open to, in the face of forces which provoke
      to be closed to.

      Good luck with your research!

      ==Gene Poole==
    • satkartar7
      ... hello Arthur, yes, meditation if it is avaible to a person in pain shifts the focus the attention what can feed the pain to the inward realms so the pain
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 22, 2003
        --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > Greetings!
        >
        > I am Arthur Lui, I am a psychology student of the
        > University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. I have
        > been into meditation for a few years already. I just
        > know basic meditation.
        >
        > I am currently working on my undergraduate thesis
        > which deals with meditation on pain alleviation among
        > adolescent cancer patients here in manila.
        >
        > Would your society be able to give me some pointers /
        > suggestions / facts about my study?
        >
        > Thank you very much.
        >
        > Yours,
        >
        > Arthur Lui
        > aq_lui@y...


        hello Arthur,

        yes, meditation if it is avaible to
        a person in pain shifts the focus the attention what can feed the pain to
        'the inward' realms so the pain will
        diminish

        I heard that Nisargadatta Maharaj who
        died from cancer did not take any
        painkillers

        I use [transcend] pain as energy by
        directing it as a flow inside my
        Shusumna and from there upward, but
        than I am a chi junky <grin>

        Of course with cancer the final hour
        should be kept in mind; during my sanmat missionary years my hobby was healoing
        [haho Nina ;o)] and I noticed, that a
        person in pain is spiralled down toward
        despair fear and powerlessness. this
        can be elevated by gently touching
        the ajna and the right ear, holding
        the patient's hand and asking that
        s/he tries to look at the ajna point
        from within: as to look at a Tv
        screen, but only into the middle of
        that. The screen could be dark, but
        state, that there is a tunnel in
        there; what will appear as a tiny dot
        of light first and if attention is
        further held there the dot will turn
        into a shiny tunnel ,which has the
        light of 100 suns on the other end.
        The tunnel into samadhi and death
        have one and the same rout, or brain function. you as a doctor can research
        this is it the lack of oxygen or else
        .. I dunno and for the spiritual
        journey it is insignificant

        love, Karta

        <http://sanmat-meditation.net/santmat/shabd-1.html>
      • satkartar7
        ... correct Url I forgot, that why touch the right ear: on the above page there are instructions for
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 22, 2003
          --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "satkartar7" <mi_nok@y...> wrote:
          > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > > Greetings!
          > >
          > > I am Arthur Lui, I am a psychology student of the
          > > University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. I have
          > > been into meditation for a few years already. I just
          > > know basic meditation.
          > >
          > > I am currently working on my undergraduate thesis
          > > which deals with meditation on pain alleviation among
          > > adolescent cancer patients here in manila.
          > >
          > > Would your society be able to give me some pointers /
          > > suggestions / facts about my study?
          > >
          > > Thank you very much.
          > >
          > > Yours,
          > >
          > > Arthur Lui
          > > aq_lui@y...
          >
          >
          > hello Arthur,
          >
          > yes, meditation if it is avaible to
          > a person in pain shifts the focus the attention what can feed the pain to
          > 'the inward' realms so the pain will
          > diminish
          >
          > I heard that Nisargadatta Maharaj who
          > died from cancer did not take any
          > painkillers
          >
          > I use [transcend] pain as energy by
          > directing it as a flow inside my
          > Shusumna and from there upward, but
          > than I am a chi junky <grin>
          >
          > Of course with cancer the final hour
          > should be kept in mind; during my sanmat missionary years my hobby was healing
          > [haho Nina ;o)] and I noticed, that a
          > person in pain is spiralled down toward
          > despair fear and powerlessness. this
          > can be elevated by gently touching
          > the ajna and the right ear, holding
          > the patient's hand and asking that
          > s/he tries to look at the ajna point
          > from within: as to look at a Tv
          > screen, but only into the middle of
          > that. The screen could be dark, but
          > state, that there is a tunnel in
          > there; what will appear as a tiny dot
          > of light first and if attention is
          > further held there the dot will turn
          > into a shiny tunnel ,which has the
          > light of 100 suns on the other end.
          > The tunnel into samadhi and death
          > have one and the same rout, or brain function. you as a doctor can research
          > this is it the lack of oxygen or else
          > .. I dunno and for the spiritual
          > journey it is insignificant
          >
          > love, Karta
          >

          correct Url

          <http://santmat-meditation.net/santmat/shabd-1.html>

          I forgot, that why touch the right ear:
          on the above page there are instructions
          for listening to the iner-sound, whwt
          also can mesmerise someone out of pain
        • Gene Poole
          ... Hello Arthur... I wish you success with your study. Pain is generally synonymous with _contraction_. Pain-relieving drugs (opiates, etc) counteract
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 22, 2003
            > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:

            > Greetings!
            >
            > I am Arthur Lui, I am a psychology student of the
            > University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. I have
            > been into meditation for a few years already. I just
            > know basic meditation.
            >
            > I am currently working on my undergraduate thesis
            > which deals with meditation on pain alleviation among
            > adolescent cancer patients here in manila.
            >
            > Would your society be able to give me some pointers /
            > suggestions / facts about my study?
            >
            > Thank you very much.
            >
            > Yours,
            >
            > Arthur Lui

            Hello Arthur...

            I wish you success with your study.

            Pain is generally synonymous with _contraction_.

            Pain-relieving drugs (opiates, etc) counteract
            contraction by producing the opposite effect,
            which is termed 'dilation'.

            Meditation is 'prescribed' in order to produce
            'dilation' of consciousness. While we understand
            that this is roughly a metaphorical description,
            meditation does result in _expansion_.

            Now we must carefully compare the concepts
            of dilation and expansion.

            An object which grows (expands) in size is not
            necessarily in a state of dilation. But a passage-
            way which grows in size (the space of the passage=
            way expands) is said to be dilating.

            We have seen use of language which uses those
            terms interchangeably, while they are clearly not
            interchangeable.

            We generally do not want pain to expand or grow;
            nor do we want it to dilate, whatever that might
            mean.

            We do want awareness to dilate, and this is what
            certain analgesics can do. It seems that meditation
            can also lead to dilation of awareness.

            One way to look at dilation of awareness is to
            is to compare the effects of a spotlight to that
            of a floodlight. The spotlight is contracted,
            compared to the floodlight.

            Pain reduces (constricts) awareness to a 'point',
            similar to a spotlight. And that is literally the
            'point' of pain. It draws attention.

            Diffusion/dilation of awareness encompasses
            a large area, in which is found the point of pain.
            On average, there is more non-pain area in awareness
            than pain area. On average, pain is perceived as being
            less than before dilation of awareness.

            Understand that this is not a matter of distraction
            from pain, but rather, gathering a very large context
            in which pain is a minority in awareness.

            The well-known 'expansive' effects of meditation
            may therefore be better stated as 'dilation':

            [dilation n : the act of expanding an aperture; "the dilation of the pupil of the eye"]

            The pupil of the eye dilates not only when an
            object of pleasure or desire is seen, but also when
            opiates are at work in the blood.

            You may be looking for a "common gateway"; IE,
            what it is that meditation, pleasure/love and
            opiates have in common; or more to the point,
            how to exploit that gateway by purely meditative
            means.

            'Meditations' which can be measured to produce
            endorphins is one clue.

            The metaphor of 'aperture' is useful in this search;
            to be open to, in the face of forces which provoke
            to be closed to.

            Good luck with your research!

            ==Gene Poole==
          • arthur gregory lui
            Hi Gene Poole! Thanks! What you ve said enlightened me on my study. Thanks again. Arthur ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo!
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 22, 2003
              Hi Gene Poole!

              Thanks! What you've said enlightened me on my study.

              Thanks again.

              Arthur

              --- Gene Poole <gene_poole@...> wrote:
              > > medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              >
              > > Greetings!
              > >
              > > I am Arthur Lui, I am a psychology student of the
              > > University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines. I
              > have
              > > been into meditation for a few years already. I
              > just
              > > know basic meditation.
              > >
              > > I am currently working on my undergraduate thesis
              > > which deals with meditation on pain alleviation
              > among
              > > adolescent cancer patients here in manila.
              > >
              > > Would your society be able to give me some
              > pointers /
              > > suggestions / facts about my study?
              > >
              > > Thank you very much.
              > >
              > > Yours,
              > >
              > > Arthur Lui
              >
              > Hello Arthur...
              >
              > I wish you success with your study.
              >
              > Pain is generally synonymous with _contraction_.
              >
              > Pain-relieving drugs (opiates, etc) counteract
              > contraction by producing the opposite effect,
              > which is termed 'dilation'.
              >
              > Meditation is 'prescribed' in order to produce
              > 'dilation' of consciousness. While we understand
              > that this is roughly a metaphorical description,
              > meditation does result in _expansion_.
              >
              > Now we must carefully compare the concepts
              > of dilation and expansion.
              >
              > An object which grows (expands) in size is not
              > necessarily in a state of dilation. But a passage-
              > way which grows in size (the space of the passage=
              > way expands) is said to be dilating.
              >
              > We have seen use of language which uses those
              > terms interchangeably, while they are clearly not
              > interchangeable.
              >
              > We generally do not want pain to expand or grow;
              > nor do we want it to dilate, whatever that might
              > mean.
              >
              > We do want awareness to dilate, and this is what
              > certain analgesics can do. It seems that meditation
              > can also lead to dilation of awareness.
              >
              > One way to look at dilation of awareness is to
              > is to compare the effects of a spotlight to that
              > of a floodlight. The spotlight is contracted,
              > compared to the floodlight.
              >
              > Pain reduces (constricts) awareness to a 'point',
              > similar to a spotlight. And that is literally the
              > 'point' of pain. It draws attention.
              >
              > Diffusion/dilation of awareness encompasses
              > a large area, in which is found the point of pain.
              > On average, there is more non-pain area in awareness
              > than pain area. On average, pain is perceived as
              > being
              > less than before dilation of awareness.
              >
              > Understand that this is not a matter of distraction
              > from pain, but rather, gathering a very large
              > context
              > in which pain is a minority in awareness.
              >
              > The well-known 'expansive' effects of meditation
              > may therefore be better stated as 'dilation':
              >
              > [dilation n : the act of expanding an aperture; "the
              > dilation of the pupil of the eye"]
              >
              > The pupil of the eye dilates not only when an
              > object of pleasure or desire is seen, but also when
              > opiates are at work in the blood.
              >
              > You may be looking for a "common gateway"; IE,
              > what it is that meditation, pleasure/love and
              > opiates have in common; or more to the point,
              > how to exploit that gateway by purely meditative
              > means.
              >
              > 'Meditations' which can be measured to produce
              > endorphins is one clue.
              >
              > The metaphor of 'aperture' is useful in this search;
              > to be open to, in the face of forces which provoke
              > to be closed to.
              >
              > Good luck with your research!
              >
              > ==Gene Poole==
              >
              >


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