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Re: Question about pain (from Email)

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  • Jeff Belyea
    ... Y - Begin by simply noticing when you are inhaling and when you are exhaling. Follow the rhythm by noticing how your chest and stomach rise as in you
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 25, 2003
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      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > I have gone thru 3 abdominal operations in 8 weeks and
      > need some pain relief meditation. I'm tired of taking pills
      > Thank you.
      > Y

      Y -

      Begin by simply
      noticing when you
      are inhaling and
      when you are
      exhaling. Follow
      the rhythm by
      noticing how your
      chest and stomach
      rise as in you
      inhale, and then
      focus on exhaling
      silently and very
      gently. Feel your
      breathing from the
      inside.

      As you continue
      to notice your breathing,
      imagine the pain
      as an energy ball,
      or a light with no
      mass. Each time
      you notice your
      exhale, imagine the
      pain light getting
      smaller. Keep
      reducing the light
      until it becomes
      just a pin light.

      Move that light from
      your stomach to the
      point between the
      eyebrows with the flow
      of your inhale, feel
      its subtle vibration
      as it rises to the point
      between your eyebrows.

      Still noticing your
      inhaling and exhaling,
      keep your attention on
      the pin light that you
      are looking at from the
      inside, between your
      eyebrows.

      Sometimes almost immediately,
      and at other times with a little
      practice the pin light will begin
      to diffuse into blue-white
      or bright white, or any
      number of color activities
      that will keep your attention.

      As you watch the colors
      you may find yourself
      absorbed in a new, pain-free
      comfort for a time. And
      even as the colors subside
      you may find that you
      are so relaxed that the
      pain is reduced and you
      are able to tolerate it
      with little or no discomfort.

      Continue this meditation
      for a few minutes whenever
      it occurs to you, of if you
      feel good pain reduction,
      you can spend an hour or so
      in this quiet meditation.

      Hope this helps. It is very
      subtle and the urge to keep
      checking in on the pain
      is common. But bring your
      attention back to the light
      when it occurs to you that
      you have shifted to the
      pain attention.

      If you use a mantra,
      this meditation will
      be aided by using it.


      Love, Jeff
    • Nina
      That s really interesting, Jeff, to see how you approach this. I tend to have a very different approach to pain, one informed by no escape , perhaps informed
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 25, 2003
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        That's really interesting, Jeff, to see how you approach this. I tend
        to have a very different approach to pain, one informed by 'no
        escape', perhaps informed by the monthly facts of this female body,
        perhaps informed by a sense of 'labor'... but it applies equally well
        to most any pain.

        It is that when pain arises, I get square in the middle of it, like a
        queen squatting in the dirt, and ride it, broad and far. I sink my
        attention teeth into it, get absorbed by it, become it.

        I move my body into positions where the pain is more tolerable,
        whatever positions those may be.

        Breathing is good, but I give myself permission (I originally wrote
        persimmon! lol!) to breathe long, slow and deep, or to breathe
        however I 'need' to, which, btw, even if it is ragged and disrupted
        in the beginning, usually leads eventually to long, slow and deep,
        and that 'respiratory wave' which is the 'essential breath'.

        There is another method, which is to breathe through the pain. Extend
        the inhalation through the area that hurts, allowing the body to
        expand in that area with the inhalation, then exhale and relax into
        the pain, and/or imagine the pain washing out with the exhale, like
        grains of sand moving with the ocean waves along a beach. If you have
        trouble feeling the breath move through the pained area, put your
        hands there and imagine that area welling with the breath.

        It isn't so much that I 'give in' to the pain, but I face it, partner
        with it, get to know the shape of it, and let it express. It is there
        for good reason, as the body is 'changing', and no such change is
        without intensity.

        I have found that the above practice, that of facing the pain,
        eventually transforms the pain into something else. It is transformed
        into sensation with certain qualities, but only sensation, like any
        other sensation. At that point, intensity may be separated from the
        sensation, it is revealed that intensity (pain) comes from how one
        views sensation, and how one interacts with it.

        (That's not to say it doesn't hurt like hell. :) )

        Escape is nice, though, and can help with the exhaustion that can
        accompany chronic pain. With chronic pain, it is also the case that
        distraction can work wonders. Why dwell on it, get busy, find
        something you like doing better than feeling pained. :)

        That said, pain is a wondrous thing, a reminder of our incarnation,
        and an invitation to listen inward, to the pain, but also to the
        context of the pain... what may be causing or contributing to the
        pain, or what may be masked by the pain. (What is beneath pain is
        usually difficult to see; as we avoid pain, we avoid that which is
        hidden.) It is an opportunity to first recognize, then accept and
        then choose a course of action, if that is discovered as a
        possibility.

        Good luck to the original question-asker... I hope your tum heals
        quickly and well.

        Nina

        > > I have gone thru 3 abdominal operations in 8 weeks and
        > > need some pain relief meditation. I'm tired of taking pills
        > > Thank you.
        > > Y
        >
        > Y -
        >
        > Begin by simply
        > noticing when you
        > are inhaling and
        > when you are
        > exhaling. <snip>
        >
        > Love, Jeff
      • Gene Poole
        ... _1 Ask your Dr about a TENS unit _2 Be sure your systemic levels of magnesium, the mineral, are maximized. _3 Avoid intake of iron. _3a Look into
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 25, 2003
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          >medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:

          > I have gone thru 3 abdominal operations in 8 weeks and
          > need some pain relief meditation. I'm tired of taking pills
          > Thank you.
          > Y

          _1 Ask your Dr about a TENS unit

          _2 Be sure your systemic levels of magnesium,
          the mineral, are maximized.

          _3 Avoid intake of iron.

          _3a Look into using the cell-salt (homeopathic)
          called 'ferrum phos' in 12X potency.

          _4 If you take opiate or opioid pain pills, prepare
          your dose by powdering the pills in a mortar
          and pestle, with a goodly amount of Cal-Mag
          (brand which includes zinc and boron) powder;
          stir the powder into a glass of water which
          contains about 1,000 mg of Alacer brand
          'Emergen-C' powder. Drink after eating.

          The above method will neutralize many of
          the side-effects of pain pills. This should not
          be done with time-release medications.

          _5 Liquid Benedryl (generic: diphenhydramine
          hydrochloride), one ounce before bed, will
          shorten the need for pain meds, and allow
          good sleep.

          Good luck, friend!


          ==Gene Poole==
        • satkartar7
          ... yes, it is intwersting; Jeff just described the iner-light portion of santmat meditation ... yes, this works well: I at times add: breath in and send that
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 25, 2003
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            > That's really interesting, Jeff, to see how you approach this.

            yes, it is intwersting; Jeff just
            described the iner-light portion of
            santmat meditation



            > I tend
            > to have a very different approach to pain, one informed by 'no
            > escape', perhaps informed by the monthly facts of this female body,
            > perhaps informed by a sense of 'labor'... but it applies equally well
            > to most any pain.
            >
            > It is that when pain arises, I get square in the middle of it, like a
            > queen squatting in the dirt, and ride it, broad and far. I sink my
            > attention teeth into it, get absorbed by it, become it.
            >
            > I move my body into positions where the pain is more tolerable,
            > whatever positions those may be.
            >
            > Breathing is good, but I give myself permission (I originally wrote
            > persimmon! lol!) to breathe long, slow and deep, or to breathe
            > however I 'need' to, which, btw, even if it is ragged and disrupted
            > in the beginning, usually leads eventually to long, slow and deep,
            > and that 'respiratory wave' which is the 'essential breath'.
            >
            > There is another method, which is to breathe through the pain. Extend
            > the inhalation through the area that hurts, allowing the body to
            > expand in that area with the inhalation, then exhale and relax into
            > the pain, and/or imagine the pain washing out with the exhale, like
            > grains of sand moving with the ocean waves along a beach. If you have
            > trouble feeling the breath move through the pained area, put your
            > hands there and imagine that area welling with the breath.



            yes, this works well: I at times add:
            breath in and send that Prana to the
            parts to heal and breath out the PAIN
            itself






            >
            > It isn't so much that I 'give in' to the pain, but I face it, partner
            > with it, get to know the shape of it, and let it express. It is there
            > for good reason, as the body is 'changing', and no such change is
            > without intensity.
            >
            > I have found that the above practice, that of facing the pain,
            > eventually transforms the pain into something else. It is transformed
            > into sensation with certain qualities, but only sensation, like any
            > other sensation. At that point, intensity may be separated from the
            > sensation, it is revealed that intensity (pain) comes from how one
            > views sensation, and how one interacts with it.
            >
            > (That's not to say it doesn't hurt like hell. :) )
            >
            > Escape is nice, though, and can help with the exhaustion that can
            > accompany chronic pain. With chronic pain, it is also the case that
            > distraction can work wonders. Why dwell on it, get busy, find
            > something you like doing better than feeling pained. :)
            >
            > That said, pain is a wondrous thing, a reminder of our incarnation,
            > and an invitation to listen inward, to the pain, but also to the
            > context of the pain... what may be causing or contributing to the
            > pain, or what may be masked by the pain. (What is beneath pain is
            > usually difficult to see; as we avoid pain, we avoid that which is
            > hidden.) It is an opportunity to first recognize, then accept and
            > then choose a course of action, if that is discovered as a
            > possibility.
            >
            > Good luck to the original question-asker... I hope your tum heals
            > quickly and well.
            >
            > Nina
            >
            > > > I have gone thru 3 abdominal operations in 8 weeks and
            > > > need some pain relief meditation. I'm tired of taking pills
            > > > Thank you.
            > > > Y
            > >
            > > Y -
            > >
            > > Begin by simply
            > > noticing when you
            > > are inhaling and
            > > when you are
            > > exhaling. <snip>
            > >
            > > Love, Jeff
          • medit8ionsociety
            ... Dear group, When I post the questions from Email, I have usually given my 2 cents worth, and always ask permission to get more help by posting them here.
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 26, 2003
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              --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
              <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > I have gone thru 3 abdominal operations in 8 weeks and
              > need some pain relief meditation. I'm tired of taking pills
              > Thank you.
              > Y

              Dear group,
              When I post the questions from Email, I have usually given my 2 cents
              worth, and always ask permission to get more help by posting them
              here. For instance, in this case, some of what I answered is below.
              Thank you from Y to all who answered with such valuable pointers. But
              what I want to focus on is one thing he shared with me, and that is
              that, as he put it, 'about 100 years ago' he used to visit Atlantic
              City and sleep under the boardwalk. Well, that struck home, as I did
              that many times in my youth (usually around the Chelsea beach area).
              As I witnessed the memories fill my minds eye, I also remembered how
              valuable memories can be in pain relief. For instance, I thought about
              how sometimes you can go into a patient's room who has intractable
              pain, and just by talking about their youth or a hobby or sport they
              are interested in, the pain is no longer there during the discussion,
              and for quite a while after. BTW, Y's wife happens to be a nurse, and
              I'm sure this is helping him with his physical recovery very much too.
              So what I am getting at is that if you know someone going through
              pain, or have the opportunity to volunteer your time and energy to
              those you don't know, but need help, just by talking with them, you
              will be able to help them tremendously. And of course, you will feel
              ten feet tall yourself, as is the case whenever you do good for others.

              Peace and blessings,
              Bob

              OK here's some of what I replied to Y:

              Dear Y,
              My suggestion is to check out the Visualization of Cellular Healing
              Technique on our web site:
              http://www.meditationsociety.com/week29.html
              It actually has many methods, and #8 is specific to pain, but they all
              have potential to help.
              *snip*
              As an RN, I do suggest following your physician's directions for pain
              relief, including taking the meds s/he directs, but I also know that
              meditation can help tremendously. I wish you well.
              Peace and blessings,
              Bob Rose, President,
              Meditation Society of America
            • satkartar7
              ... your pointer is great Bob, about the juerney into the past, it can be revoced by a primal sense: the memory of smell and music; to hear the music played
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 26, 2003
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                --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                > --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, medit8ionsociety
                > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                > > I have gone thru 3 abdominal operations in 8 weeks and
                > > need some pain relief meditation. I'm tired of taking pills
                > > Thank you.
                > > Y
                >
                > Dear group,
                > When I post the questions from Email, I have usually given my 2 cents
                > worth, and always ask permission to get more help by posting them
                > here. For instance, in this case, some of what I answered is below.
                > Thank you from Y to all who answered with such valuable pointers. But
                > what I want to focus on is one thing he shared with me, and that is
                > that, as he put it, 'about 100 years ago' he used to visit Atlantic
                > City and sleep under the boardwalk. Well, that struck home, as I did
                > that many times in my youth (usually around the Chelsea beach area).
                > As I witnessed the memories fill my minds eye, I also remembered how
                > valuable memories can be in pain relief. For instance, I thought about
                > how sometimes you can go into a patient's room who has intractable
                > pain, and just by talking about their youth or a hobby or sport they
                > are interested in, the pain is no longer there during the discussion,
                > and for quite a while after. BTW, Y's wife happens to be a nurse, and
                > I'm sure this is helping him with his physical recovery very much too.
                > So what I am getting at is that if you know someone going through
                > pain, or have the opportunity to volunteer your time and energy to
                > those you don't know, but need help, just by talking with them, you
                > will be able to help them tremendously. And of course, you will feel
                > ten feet tall yourself, as is the case whenever you do good for others.
                >
                > Peace and blessings,
                > Bob
                >
                > OK here's some of what I replied to Y:
                >
                > Dear Y,
                > My suggestion is to check out the Visualization of Cellular Healing
                > Technique on our web site:
                > http://www.meditationsociety.com/week29.html
                > It actually has many methods, and #8 is specific to pain, but they all
                > have potential to help.
                > *snip*
                > As an RN, I do suggest following your physician's directions for pain
                > relief, including taking the meds s/he directs, but I also know that
                > meditation can help tremendously. I wish you well.
                > Peace and blessings,
                > Bob Rose, President,
                > Meditation Society of America

                your pointer is great Bob,

                about the juerney into the past, it
                can be revoced by a primal sense:
                the memory of smell and music; to hear
                the music played those pleasent
                youthful years

                karta
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