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18177Re: [Meditation Society of America] Question about the Eightfold Path and "catharsis"

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  • sean tremblay
    Feb 24, 2012
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      I am reminded of some of the teachings of Islam, when they mention not to supress your feelings, but simply do not act on them, just allow them to pass though you.


      From: walto <calhorn@...>
      To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2012 9:52 PM
      Subject: Re: [Meditation Society of America] Question about the Eightfold Path and "catharsis"

       
      Thanks, Aideen.

      One of the things I was wondering about was the apparently very large gulf between giving something "bare attention" and really living/working through it (perhaps for purposes 'abreaction' or 'sublimation'). I mean, is there a Buddhist notion of catharsis?

      W

      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "Aideen Mckenna" <aideenmck@...> wrote:
      >
      > The way I understand Buddhism, there is never repression. The Buddha
      > understood how the human mind worked. Driving an unwelcome emotion deeper
      > into the unconscious only results in giving the troublesome thing more
      > strength. When practicing Vipassana (insight meditation), one observes the
      > thought, giving it "bare attention"(i.e. touching the mind as lightly as a
      > bubble on the observed thought), then moving on. There's never any pushing
      > away - that only empowers the thought. Bhante Henepola Gunaratana's classic
      > Mindfulness in Plain English is helpful here.
      >
      > As for the concept of dependent origination - can one agree with it without
      > accepting all of the Eightfold Path? I don't think so - at least not from
      > the point of view of Theravada Buddhism. If I were asking that question,
      > I'd go to the excellent Barbara O'Brien - she can be contacted here:
      >
      >
      >
      > http://buddhism.about.com/bio/Barbara-O-Brien-38125.htm
      >
      >
      >
      > With metta,
      >
      > Aideen
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > From: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of walto
      > Sent: February-23-12 7:17 AM
      > To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Question about the Eightfold Path
      > and "catharsis"
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi, folks.
      >
      > I was wondering if any of the mavens here would be willing to provide their
      > thoughts on whether they think there's any conflict between the "Right
      > Thinking/Right Action/Right Speech" portions of the Eightfold Path and
      > conventional views according to which it is healthy for unconscious thoughts
      > (even angry or mean ones) to be brought to consciousness and perhaps even
      > expressed. If some anger is being repressed, can it be conducive to
      > well-being to "keep it bottled up"? (I take it a Primal Scream isn't Right
      > Speech.)
      >
      > Also, is this an empirical question, do you think, so that the best way of
      > answering it is to see what works (or what has been shown to work in
      > properly designed studies), or do you take it rather to be something that is
      > deducible from one's view of the mind? For example, do you think that the
      > benefits of following the Eightfold Path are simply deducible from the
      > concept of dependent origination? That is, can one agree with the latter
      > without accepting all of the former?
      >
      > Any thoughts on these matters are welcome. Thanks!
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > W
      >



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