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17261Re: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Health, EEG Studies, and Schools of Tibetan Buddhism

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  • WestWindWood
    Jun 1, 2010
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      Can meditation cure cancer? From my own experience, I can say yes, but first some background on another medical issue that influenced my approach to dealing with cancer. In my early twenties I fell of a ladder and compressed a disk in my back. I developed an arthritic back with calcium deposits that could be seen on an X-ray. There was talk of surgery to fuse the vertebrae. At this point in my life I could do a concentration kind of meditation and get in touch with my feelings, but none of the enlightenment experience for any kind of guidance from that wisdom found there. So while meditating, I brought up the issue of my hurting back. Did I have any emotional reason behind the pain? It turned out that I did, like I wanted special treatment from others because of my problem. Well I rationalized that in my situation I was unlikely to get sympathy so lets give it up. I could then do visualizations about the healing process and three months later, perfect X-ray.
      So, four decades later I am diagnosed with colon cancer. It was discovered through a colonoscopy, but the cancer could be palpated easily on the lower left side. It was hard and almost a foot long. I am thinking that cancer and arthritis are both failures of the immune system so lets work on the cancer using the same technique. I was under a lot of stress because my wife’s first husband was very abusive. Now since I was a laid back kind person from all the meditation, she took out her anxieties on me and I didn’t do any pushing back at her. I meditated about my wife and yes I was supposed to be married to her. Through concentration type of meditation like I did for the arthritic back, I determined that the stress was so much that I just wanted out through death, but unlike the arthritis problem, I just could not rationalize a solution to the stressful situation to deal with my cancer. If the situation had not been so emotionally overpowering, I am sure I could have rationalized some solution and got a cancer remission, but it was just too much. OK, so then I did meditation of the enlightenment type and got the answer back that I had to keep going, it was not my time. I ALWAYS do what I am directed to do in meditation so I managed. The cancer got soft and went to about half the size in ten days; however, I was scheduled for surgery and went ahead with it; otherwise, I think my wife would have done nuts. The pathology showed the tumor to be non-aggressive, which is quite unusual for a cancer. I did not tell any doctors about my meditation. I believe the most important point here is the ability for a person who meditates to know what is going on in their subconscious, an ability that most people do not have. Perhaps enough talking with a therapist would bring the same information to consciousness, but it would take half a year to get there. See the book, You Can Fight For Your Life by Lawrence LeShan for the therapist approach.


      --- On Tue, 6/1/10, Katrina <blondewithaphd@...> wrote:

      From: Katrina <blondewithaphd@...>
      Subject: [Meditation Society of America] Re: Health, EEG Studies, and Schools of Tibetan Buddhism
      To: meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, June 1, 2010, 6:14 AM

       


      I have about 70 to 80 studies in my reference section of my dissertation. If you or anyone else is interested in reading them (or any part of my research) you are more than welcome. You would be AMAZED to learn what meditation has been shown to help.

      Studies in the past have examined how meditation can help ease symptoms of schizophrenia (Johnson, Penn, Fredrickson, & Meyer, 2009), help people suffering from chronic depression (Barnhofer et al., 2009), lower blood pressure (Pace et al., 2008), treat post-traumatic stress disorder (Hagelin et al., 1999), treat psoriasis and cancer (Ong, Shapiro, & Manber, 2007), as well as help chronic lower back pain (Morone, Greco, & Weiner, 2007).

      In my research I hope to show the multidimensionality of meditation so that we can get more funding to further explore the benefits. Currently meditation is used as a complementary alternative medicine for cancer pain/symptoms. What if the next step is a cure?

      Food for thought: Is it possible to cure your body with your mind?

      Katrina Zaleski
      Principal Researcher
      NorthCentral University
      http://zaleskiresearch.brinkster.net/



      --- In meditationsocietyofamerica@yahoogroups.com, "WestWind" <westwindwood2003@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ketrina's mention that hundreds of articles exist on the scientific study of meditation got my curiosity so on Google I found several articles of interest which I thought I would pass along. Back in the early 1970s I lived in the San Francisco Bay Area where the general thought was there were more mystics running around for the given population than there was in India. I hung on the peripheries of the various organizations, but did not really trust them because many of the teachers seemed to me to be into it for the power and money. I went my own road after a while, but meditated regularly about 45 minutes a day for decades. Maybe I am doing some catching up. What caught my interest on the Google search is that after seven years a person who meditates has about half the health issues of one who does not. Also, one who meditates can have profound control over the parasympathetic nervous system, and be able to delve into the psyche at such a level that they can get into trouble psychologically. Looking back I guess I was lucky to not have done myself any damage if I go by this web site: http://www.kagyu.org.nz/content/tibetanbuddhism.html
      >
      > This other link discusses EEG and lowered metabolic activity of advanced mediators with control of the parasympathetic nervous system (control over heart rate and metabolism) showing the condition to be different than sleep, deep sleep and being awake. http://physiologyonline.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/13/3/149
      >


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