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Re:Yogic Body Temperature Research

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  • Jeffrey S. Brooks
    Hello David, I can see some useful aspects of this simple research proposal that you have suggested. As I see it the question to answer is: Charismatic
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 5 5:10 AM
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      Hello David, I can see some useful aspects of this simple research proposal
      that you have suggested. As I see it the question to answer is:

      Charismatic contemplatives often report being hot. Is this purely
      perceptual, or do they really have more body heat?

      How do we answer this question?

      Find several charismatics, who report being over heated, and who are
      properly screened through a charismatic questionnaire, then send each one of
      them an electronic thermometer that has the correct resolution to answer the
      question, and the ability to log sufficient data-points to make a long-term
      study meaningful. The subjects will be instruct to attach the device to
      their body in a manner that will not hinder the subject, but will meet
      proper medical research standards for monitoring bodily temperature. The
      attachment of the device should be recorded visually with an accompanying
      digital camera. The thermometer should be attached for the majority of the
      24 hour period and should have the ability to log data at a reasonable rate,
      such as 1/minute; however, I see no reason why the device could not be
      removed to bath, but is should most definitely be attached during the rest
      cycle. Should we say each subject should be monitored through most of 24
      hours per day, for at least a week, at a rate of one sample per minute?

      So, your job is as follows:

      1) Identify 10 charismatic subjects through a questionnaire (the GWV has
      done this for you).
      2) Find a way that a subject can attach a temperature monitoring device to
      their body that will not hinder their activities. Discuss this with a
      qualified medical professional.
      3) Acquire a temperature monitoring device with the correct resolution that
      will gather sufficient data. Discuss this device with a qualified technical
      person who has extensive experience with monitoring and controlling
      temperature (I can help you with this, but you need to do the research, and
      I will just tell you if the device is sufficient for the job). The device
      should be sufficiently robust to handle being bounced around, and have
      sufficient resolution and precision to make the measurements meaningful,
      such as measuring temperature at 100°F to two decimal places +/- .02°F (40°c
      to three decimal places +/- .002°c). The subject should be provided with a
      carrying bag to drag the device around. The device should also have
      sufficient power to run nonstop for one week without running out of power,
      or shutting itself off. And, for easy of data recovery, it should have the
      ability to download its data via a computer connection, such as blue-tooth,
      or USB, etc.

      Once you have all of these questions resolved then send each subject the
      monitoring device. You could have one device that you send off successively
      to each subject. Each time it is returned, you download the data and send it
      to the next subject on your list. Or, if the device if blue tooth, then
      theoretically you could gain access to it at intervals when it is within the
      range of a WIFI signal. If such a device exists, then you could provide the
      subject with a preaddressed FedEx envelope to send it to the next subject.

      You will of course want a control group as well, which would be an equal
      number of subjects, who have responded to the questionnaire negatively.
      Ideally your control subjects would be in the same region and have the same
      physiological characteristics as your primary test subject to rule out
      regional atmospheric differences.

      Best regards, Jeff Brooks
    • David
      Hi Jeff, I wasn t thinking about doing formal research such as this, I am quite busy now. Last week I was hired by a company in Syracuse, NY to be a
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 7 4:12 PM
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        Hi Jeff, I wasn't thinking about doing formal research such as
        this, I am quite busy now. Last week I was hired by a company in
        Syracuse, NY to be a Mechatronic Engineer. They are training me in
        Mechanical Engineering and paying me 60,000$/yr, which is slightly
        above average for a graduate from my University. I have been working
        there 9 hours a day and attempting to meditate 5 hours per day as
        well, which is not easy considering I need to do other things during
        the evening that take up time such as shop for food. If you have any
        tips on organization of time it would be most appreciated.
        For this research I was simply trying to satisfy my personal
        curiosity, not prove the theory within a certain statistical
        confidence range that would be acceptable in the mainstream community.
        Actually most of my 'research' is like this and I rarely have had, in
        the past, resources to do a formal study. When I actually had the
        time and applied for such resources, back when I was in college, I was
        mostly just ignored by the faculty.

        I was just hoping that you could take a few moments out of your
        free time to take readings with a thermometer and see how closely they
        match to the control which I cited from wikipedia. If possible you
        could take readings on the hour for 24 hours and note how your
        circadian body temperature rythme compares to the norm. It would be
        a similar study to what we did in Altoona. That study really didn't
        'prove' anything scientifically but it gave us a few clues about Jhana
        - such as that some metabolic values might increase rather than decrease.

        Additionally, I would like to know what is the best way to donate
        to your cause, would you prefer a deposit into your paypal account or
        something else?
        -David



        --- In meditation_research@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey S. Brooks"
        <jhanananda@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello David, I can see some useful aspects of this simple research
        proposal
        > that you have suggested. As I see it the question to answer is:
        >
        > Charismatic contemplatives often report being hot. Is this purely
        > perceptual, or do they really have more body heat?
        >
        > How do we answer this question?
        >
        > Find several charismatics, who report being over heated, and who are
        > properly screened through a charismatic questionnaire, then send
        each one of
        > them an electronic thermometer that has the correct resolution to
        answer the
        > question, and the ability to log sufficient data-points to make a
        long-term
        > study meaningful. The subjects will be instruct to attach the device to
        > their body in a manner that will not hinder the subject, but will meet
        > proper medical research standards for monitoring bodily temperature.
        The
        > attachment of the device should be recorded visually with an
        accompanying
        > digital camera. The thermometer should be attached for the majority
        of the
        > 24 hour period and should have the ability to log data at a
        reasonable rate,
        > such as 1/minute; however, I see no reason why the device could not be
        > removed to bath, but is should most definitely be attached during
        the rest
        > cycle. Should we say each subject should be monitored through most
        of 24
        > hours per day, for at least a week, at a rate of one sample per minute?
        >
        > So, your job is as follows:
        >
        > 1) Identify 10 charismatic subjects through a questionnaire (the GWV has
        > done this for you).
        > 2) Find a way that a subject can attach a temperature monitoring
        device to
        > their body that will not hinder their activities. Discuss this with a
        > qualified medical professional.
        > 3) Acquire a temperature monitoring device with the correct
        resolution that
        > will gather sufficient data. Discuss this device with a qualified
        technical
        > person who has extensive experience with monitoring and controlling
        > temperature (I can help you with this, but you need to do the
        research, and
        > I will just tell you if the device is sufficient for the job). The
        device
        > should be sufficiently robust to handle being bounced around, and have
        > sufficient resolution and precision to make the measurements meaningful,
        > such as measuring temperature at 100°F to two decimal places +/-
        .02°F (40°c
        > to three decimal places +/- .002°c). The subject should be provided
        with a
        > carrying bag to drag the device around. The device should also have
        > sufficient power to run nonstop for one week without running out of
        power,
        > or shutting itself off. And, for easy of data recovery, it should
        have the
        > ability to download its data via a computer connection, such as
        blue-tooth,
        > or USB, etc.
        >
        > Once you have all of these questions resolved then send each subject the
        > monitoring device. You could have one device that you send off
        successively
        > to each subject. Each time it is returned, you download the data and
        send it
        > to the next subject on your list. Or, if the device if blue tooth, then
        > theoretically you could gain access to it at intervals when it is
        within the
        > range of a WIFI signal. If such a device exists, then you could
        provide the
        > subject with a preaddressed FedEx envelope to send it to the next
        subject.
        >
        > You will of course want a control group as well, which would be an equal
        > number of subjects, who have responded to the questionnaire negatively.
        > Ideally your control subjects would be in the same region and have
        the same
        > physiological characteristics as your primary test subject to rule out
        > regional atmospheric differences.
        >
        > Best regards, Jeff Brooks
        >
      • Jeffrey S. Brooks
        Hello David, congratulations upon acquiring another job. I hope it works out for you. On your temperature experiment. Yes, your idea sounds like a simple and
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 9 1:05 PM
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          Hello David, congratulations upon acquiring another job. I hope it works out
          for you.

          On your temperature experiment. Yes, your idea sounds like a simple and
          inexpensive way to go without funding. We could put the word out with those
          of our case histories to see how many would like to participate in the
          study, but we could just test it first with a few charismatics to see if
          there is any observable phenomena. However, I know I would not want to take
          my temperature every hour on the hour. I could see taking my temperature
          immediately upon waking and just before going out of body at night.

          On organizing one's time for leading a contemplative life while engaged in
          the world:
          I believe that this is the core of leading a contemplative life. In every
          age and culture it is a challenge. The general recommendation is to spend
          as little time with incidentals and as much time with leading a
          contemplative life. Find every opportunity to meditate, and otherwise
          execute your responsibilities impeccably. Doing so you will find little
          time is wasted, which gives one more time to meditate, read, reflect, etc.
          If leading a contemplative life is too much for you, while engaged in the
          world, then I believe you will find that if you can begin and end every day
          with a quality meditation session, then you will have gone a long way to
          succeeding at leading such a life.

          As for making a contribution to the GWV:
          We can always use funding. And, the easiest way for us to receive funds is
          through an online deposit in the GWV's PayPal account. To do that just go
          to PayPal and make your contribution to this email account:
          Jhananda@...

          Best regards, Jeff Brooks
        • David
          ... works out ... At my last position I was terminated partially because my programming skills were not up to the level that someone who had studied pure
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 9 3:25 PM
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            --- In meditation_research@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey S. Brooks"
            <jhanananda@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello David, congratulations upon acquiring another job. I hope it
            works out
            > for you.
            >
            At my last position I was terminated partially because my
            programming skills were not up to the level that someone who had
            studied pure computer science in college like all the other new
            employees, partially because I was the only entry level hire- everyone
            else in my hire group had 1 or 2 yrs experience, partially because I
            was not tactful enough in social situations and partially because I
            slacked off too much. The last factor was perhaps a function of the
            fact that since I was 3 yrs old I have had Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
            I was in the hospital for a month because of an Arthritis inflimation
            which caused CFS.
            I think alot of beginner contemplatives have serious mental or
            physical problems like this don't they? And end up loosing jobs or
            friends?
            In this new position I have decided to push myself harder to work
            every minute that I am on the job, however it doesn't seem like the
            ideal life to me. I would much prefer to be a monk. I will have to
            pay back my college loans before I consider that though.

            -David
          • Jeffrey S. Brooks
            Hello David, good to hear from you again. Yes, an employer wants to know that his or her employees are hard and skillful workers, so slacking off as a
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 10 4:36 AM
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              Hello David, good to hear from you again. Yes, an employer wants to know
              that his or her employees are hard and skillful workers, so "slacking off"
              as a new-hire with no resume, is a bad idea, but just because you were fired
              does not mean much, because the new-hire with no resume are always the first
              to go. You can change that by impressing your employer with hard and
              productive work.

              Yes, one must dispense with one's responsibilities in life, so paying off
              loans, and raising one's children are such responsibilities. When one's
              debt to society and family is paid, one is then free to be a full-time
              contemplative. Also, one who is intent upon being a dedicated full-time
              contemplative will do his or her best not to accumulate any debts or
              responsibilities.

              However, as you have seen from my journey, there are few in this culture who
              value a full-time contemplative, but many who are impressed with pretentious
              gurus and priests. Since rigorous contemplatives are dedicated to shedding
              the layers of self and pretension, then none of them are likely to be
              pretentious gurus and priests. Thus, a dedicated full-time contemplative in
              this culture will nonetheless have to come up with some kind of livelihood.

              I am sorry to hear about your CFS and arthritis. I can only recommend
              living as healthy a lifestyle you can, which includes not over-working
              yourself. So, learn to work skillfully not self-abusively. But, one's
              employer wants to see one working diligently, so it will take some skill on
              your part how to make that all work for you.

              Best, Jeff
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