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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Want to start turning, what do you think of this lathe?

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  • Arthur Slaughter
    I don t like tubular ways just not enough beef. I did note a 3/4 horse with what looked to be cast iron bed that is similar tho the one I use daily and can t
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 4 4:20 PM
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      I don't like tubular ways  just not enough beef. I did note a 3/4 horse with what looked to be cast iron bed that is similar tho the one I use daily and can't seem to do any harm to.  I would go that way for an inexpensive lathe.
      THL Finnr


      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      From: kericmason@...
      Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2008 19:11:02 +0000
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Want to start turning, what do you think of this lathe?

      Hi everyone,

      I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
      class.

      http://busybeetools .ca/cgi-bin/ picture10?
      &NETID=142955040408 1837689&NTITEM= CT083

      This lathe is on sale, and it says it would be good for beginners,
      but I know nothing, so I am asking :)

      I would like to make a finial for my pavillion pole, pins for
      throwing game targets, and balls for bocce. Other projects might
      eventually appeal, but those are the ones I am most keen on.

      Any feedback would be greatly appriciated,

      Eric

      Text description from the link above:

      LATHE WOOD 14" X 40" 4SPD 1/2HP
      Item No: CT083

      14" x 40" Wood Turning Lathe, 1/2 HP

      An Excellent Lathe For Beginners
      Square Steel Tubular Ways

      A complete basic wood lathe, pressed steel base with square tubular
      ways,
      cast iron headstock, tailstock and tool rest.

      Features
      Motor: 1/2 HP, 110V, 1 Phase
      Max. length: 40"
      Max. Diameter: 14"
      Spindle" 1" - 8 TPI
      Speeds: 4 - 760 - 2240 RPM
      Gross Weight: 30kg..
      Carton size: 9" x 14 1/2" x 58"

      Standard Equipment
      Motor
      Cross slide
      12" tool rest
      6" face plate
      Spur centre
      Ball bearing centre

      2 Year Warranty




      Get in touch in an instant. Get Windows Live Messenger now.
    • Eric Hess
      If you re looking for a good beginner lathe, I d recommend the Rikon (if you can find one right now). It is right around $250, you can get a bed extension for
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 5 8:27 AM
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        If you're looking for a good beginner lathe, I'd recommend the Rikon
        (if you can find one right now). It is right around $250, you can get
        a bed extension for it, and it is a 3/4 HP motor. I have one and it is
        a great little machine. They've been so popular, Woodcraft can't keep
        them in stock, I don't know if other vendors are having the same
        problem, I assume they are. For ease of use and features, I like it
        much better than the Delta or Jet equivalents.

        Eric Hess
      • Baron Otto
        I picked up one for Harbor Freight that looked to be the same lathe. It was somewhat limited, but was a good beginner s lathe. I had mine for about 3 years
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 5 11:57 AM
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          Message
          I picked up one for Harbor Freight that looked to be the same lathe.
          It was somewhat limited, but was a good beginner's lathe. I had mine for about 3 years before I upgraded to a Jet
           
          You'll also want to pick up a chuck like the one they sell on this page if you are going to do bowl turning.
           
          Otto
           
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Mason
          Sent: Friday, April 04, 2008 3:11 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Want to start turning, what do you think of this lathe?

          Hi everyone,

          I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
          class.

          http://busybeetools .ca/cgi-bin/ picture10?
          &NETID=142955040408 1837689&NTITEM= CT083

          This lathe is on sale, and it says it would be good for beginners,
          but I know nothing, so I am asking :)

          I would like to make a finial for my pavillion pole, pins for
          throwing game targets, and balls for bocce. Other projects might
          eventually appeal, but those are the ones I am most keen on.

          Any feedback would be greatly appriciated,

          Eric

          Text description from the link above:

          LATHE WOOD 14" X 40" 4SPD 1/2HP
          Item No: CT083

          14" x 40" Wood Turning Lathe, 1/2 HP

          An Excellent Lathe For Beginners
          Square Steel Tubular Ways

          A complete basic wood lathe, pressed steel base with square tubular
          ways,
          cast iron headstock, tailstock and tool rest.

          Features
          Motor: 1/2 HP, 110V, 1 Phase
          Max. length: 40"
          Max. Diameter: 14"
          Spindle" 1" - 8 TPI
          Speeds: 4 - 760 - 2240 RPM
          Gross Weight: 30kg..
          Carton size: 9" x 14 1/2" x 58"

          Standard Equipment
          Motor
          Cross slide
          12" tool rest
          6" face plate
          Spur centre
          Ball bearing centre

          2 Year Warranty


          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG.
          Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.22.7/1361 - Release Date: 4/5/2008 7:53 AM


          No virus found in this outgoing message.
          Checked by AVG.
          Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.22.7/1361 - Release Date: 4/5/2008 7:53 AM

        • Avery Austringer
          ... The thing about that lathe that rings alarm bells in my head is the tail stock. There just doesn t appear to be enough meat on it to do anything serious
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 6 1:08 AM
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            >This lathe is on sale, and it says it would be good for beginners,
            >but I know nothing, so I am asking :)
            >
            >I would like to make a finial for my pavillion pole, pins for
            >throwing game targets, and balls for bocce. Other projects might
            >eventually appeal, but those are the ones I am most keen on.
            >
            >Any feedback would be greatly appriciated,
            >
            >Eric

            The thing about that lathe that rings alarm bells in my head is the
            tail stock. There just doesn't appear to be enough meat on it to do
            anything serious or precise. I think having big numbers in the specs
            (like swing and bed length) trumped other more important design
            considerations.

            I used to have a lathe that vibrated horribly so I rarely used it. My
            wife wanted to start playing with the lathe so two Christmases ago I
            got my wife a relatively well made Chinese knock-off of Jet's very well
            made mini-lathe. While I spent more on the one I got (right now
            Rockler is asking about $200 but it was a year and a half ago and on
            sale) than they're asking for the one you're looking at, I doubt I will
            ever find it so inadequate for my needs that I have to replace it. I
            can't say the same for my first table saw.

            Avery
          • Ralph Lindberg
            ... As Finnr noted, this is a TUBE lathe, generally excepted to sux. If I were to go with a Busybee, I would look at B2338 Unfortunately every alternative
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 6 8:05 PM
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              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Mason" <kericmason@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi everyone,
              >
              > I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
              > class.
              >
              > http://busybeetools.ca/cgi-bin/picture10?
              > &NETID=1429550404081837689&NTITEM=CT083
              >
              > This lathe is on sale, and it says it would be good for beginners,
              > but I know nothing, so I am asking :)
              >
              As Finnr noted, this is a TUBE lathe, generally excepted to sux.

              If I were to go with a Busybee, I would look at B2338

              Unfortunately every alternative lathe proposed, is sourced from US
              firms. What you need is a Canadian source for a reasonable lathe.

              If I were starting out (again), I would also look at a General Tool
              (http://www.general.ca). I rather like the 25-100 or 25-200.

              Some words of general truth. The lathe generally costs less then 1/2
              of what you end up spending, between chisels, chucks, centers, etc,
              etc, etc. I think this is still true for me, even though my lathe cost
              is currently setting about $3000. But then I have become a spinning
              nut (it's called the vortex for a reason).

              Make certain the lathe you buy is "standard" that it has standard
              MorseTaper (usually#2) and the head-stock spindle is 1x8. There are
              other "standard" sizes, but usually only found on more expensive
              lathes (ie $1K and up)

              If you end up spending serious money, consider the Nova 1624-44
              (around $1K). Order it from Bob Gadd at KMS Tools in BC

              TTFN
              Ralg
              AnTir

              (For those that don't know BusyBee is owned by the brother of the
              owner of Grizzly Tools. Unfortunately they have agreements not to sell
              across the border, so those north can't get Grizzly, only Busybee, and
              Grizzly IMO, has turned out to be the better business)
            • Ralph Lindberg
              ... Eric, for that I suggest you contact your local chapter of the AAW (http://www.woodturner.org/community/chapters/), almost every one of them has a Mentor
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 7 6:29 PM
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                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Mason" <kericmason@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Hi everyone,
                >
                > I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
                > class.
                >

                Eric, for that I suggest you contact your local chapter of the AAW
                (http://www.woodturner.org/community/chapters/), almost every one of
                them has a Mentor program, or can refer you to someone qualified to
                teach turning.

                For a great book, look at "WoodTurning, A Foundation Course" by Keith
                Rowley.
                (http://www.amazon.ca/Woodturning-Foundation-Course-Keith-Rowley/dp/1861081146/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207617893&sr=8-1)

                When Amazon.CA wants $22 and Amazon.com wants $13.51 is a why I almost
                never buy books while I am here in Canada.

                TTFN
                Ralg
                AnTir
              • Eric Mason
                Gack! Well, it looks like my plans have been turned on their ear. My project was pulled, and our whole team was just laid off! So the lathe is now on hold.
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 8 7:49 PM
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                  Gack!

                  Well, it looks like my plans have been turned on their ear. My
                  project was pulled, and our whole team was just laid off! So the
                  lathe is now on hold.

                  I'd kinda hoped for an inexpensive "good enough" lathe. I am a
                  generalist, so I don't anticipate doing a lot of turning. If that
                  means $300 lathes, I'll budget for it when I find another job.

                  I'll have a look at one of the stores that stocks the Canadian built
                  lathes.

                  Thanks,

                  Eric

                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Lindberg" <n7bsn@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Mason" <kericmason@>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi everyone,
                  > >
                  > > I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
                  > > class.
                  > >
                  > > http://busybeetools.ca/cgi-bin/picture10?
                  > > &NETID=1429550404081837689&NTITEM=CT083
                  > >
                  > > This lathe is on sale, and it says it would be good for beginners,
                  > > but I know nothing, so I am asking :)
                  > >
                  > As Finnr noted, this is a TUBE lathe, generally excepted to sux.
                  >
                  > If I were to go with a Busybee, I would look at B2338
                  >
                  > Unfortunately every alternative lathe proposed, is sourced from US
                  > firms. What you need is a Canadian source for a reasonable lathe.
                  >
                  > If I were starting out (again), I would also look at a General Tool
                  > (http://www.general.ca). I rather like the 25-100 or 25-200.
                  >
                  > Some words of general truth. The lathe generally costs less then 1/2
                  > of what you end up spending, between chisels, chucks, centers, etc,
                  > etc, etc. I think this is still true for me, even though my lathe cost
                  > is currently setting about $3000. But then I have become a spinning
                  > nut (it's called the vortex for a reason).
                  >
                  > Make certain the lathe you buy is "standard" that it has standard
                  > MorseTaper (usually#2) and the head-stock spindle is 1x8. There are
                  > other "standard" sizes, but usually only found on more expensive
                  > lathes (ie $1K and up)
                  >
                  > If you end up spending serious money, consider the Nova 1624-44
                  > (around $1K). Order it from Bob Gadd at KMS Tools in BC
                  >
                  > TTFN
                  > Ralg
                  > AnTir
                  >
                  > (For those that don't know BusyBee is owned by the brother of the
                  > owner of Grizzly Tools. Unfortunately they have agreements not to sell
                  > across the border, so those north can't get Grizzly, only Busybee, and
                  > Grizzly IMO, has turned out to be the better business)
                  >
                • maeryk
                  ... FWIW, Woodcraft usually hosts turning classes. You don t _really_ need them.. I recommend the foundations book already mentioned, and any of the Lacer skew
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 10 5:50 PM
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                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Lindberg" <n7bsn@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Mason" <kericmason@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi everyone,
                    > >
                    > > I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
                    > > class.


                    FWIW, Woodcraft usually hosts turning classes. You don't _really_ need
                    them.. I recommend the foundations book already mentioned, and any of
                    the Lacer skew books/videos, and if you want to make bowls, find
                    "Turned bowls made easy" (video)by Bill Grumbine (heck of a nice guy,
                    in every conceivable way).

                    You _can_ teach yourself, but read the books thoroughly. Richard
                    Raffan's books are very good as well.. but avoid his videos till you
                    have made some stuff. He does things so very fast that it's
                    disheartening till you learn what you are doing. :)

                    Have fun, make chips!

                    maeryk
                  • Ralph Lindberg
                    ... Maeryk, good advice, other then the bit about Woodcraft. The original questioner lives in Canada, and the only Woodcraft I know there is a furniture store
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 11 7:53 AM
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                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "maeryk" <maeryk@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > FWIW, Woodcraft usually hosts turning classes. You don't _really_ need
                      > them.. I recommend the foundations book already mentioned, and any of
                      > the Lacer skew books/videos, and if you want to make bowls, find
                      > "Turned bowls made easy" (video)by Bill Grumbine (heck of a nice guy,
                      > in every conceivable way).
                      >
                      > You _can_ teach yourself, but read the books thoroughly. Richard
                      > Raffan's books are very good as well.. but avoid his videos till you
                      > have made some stuff. He does things so very fast that it's
                      > disheartening till you learn what you are doing. :)
                      >
                      > Have fun, make chips!
                      >
                      Maeryk, good advice, other then the bit about Woodcraft. The original
                      questioner lives in Canada, and the only Woodcraft I know there is a
                      furniture store (and unrelated to the US firm).

                      Alan is great (if you ever get a chance to actually watch him use a
                      Skew, do so), Bill's video's are solid (and he is a nice guy) and
                      Richard is AMAZING at any time, his books are great and his videos are
                      also. He is currently working on an update for his book on Design of
                      Turned Objects.

                      Ralg (also a member of the AAW, and the local chapter)
                      AnTir
                    • leaking pen
                      well, everyone is still acting as ive the loonie is only worth 70 cents, instead of par. ... -- That which yields isn t always weak.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 11 9:38 AM
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                        well, everyone is still acting as ive the loonie is only worth 70
                        cents, instead of par.

                        On Mon, Apr 7, 2008 at 6:29 PM, Ralph Lindberg <n7bsn@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Mason" <kericmason@...>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hi everyone,
                        > >
                        > > I have never turned before, but I am hoping to eventually take a
                        > > class.
                        > >
                        >
                        > Eric, for that I suggest you contact your local chapter of the AAW
                        > (http://www.woodturner.org/community/chapters/), almost every one of
                        > them has a Mentor program, or can refer you to someone qualified to
                        > teach turning.
                        >
                        > For a great book, look at "WoodTurning, A Foundation Course" by Keith
                        > Rowley.
                        >
                        > (http://www.amazon.ca/Woodturning-Foundation-Course-Keith-Rowley/dp/1861081146/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207617893&sr=8-1)
                        >
                        > When Amazon.CA wants $22 and Amazon.com wants $13.51 is a why I almost
                        > never buy books while I am here in Canada.
                        >
                        > TTFN
                        > Ralg
                        > AnTir
                        >
                        >



                        --
                        That which yields isn't always weak.
                      • Ralph Lindberg
                        ... No kidding, I really miss those days... I could by tools/tooling in Canada for a fraction of the US cost (Oneway, General, even New Zealand or Oz sourced)
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 11 4:17 PM
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                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > well, everyone is still acting as ive the loonie is only worth 70
                          > cents, instead of par.
                          >
                          No kidding, I really miss those days... I could by tools/tooling in
                          Canada for a fraction of the US cost (Oneway, General, even New
                          Zealand or Oz sourced)

                          TTFN
                          Ralg (back south)
                          AnTir
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